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Exoplanet help

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posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 11:15 AM
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I just spent a couple of hours searching for a downloadable CSV, or XLS file of current expolanets. What I found...quite simply isn't usable data.

What I found was a CSV of exoplanets at exoplanets.org.... Their "Exoplanet Orbit Database". This is a rather bloated table with 4826 records, 4393 of those records nave no stellar association. There are approximately 1800 known exoplanets.

The provided table definition is different than their documentation, in that the documents mention a "kepler id" while the table does not contain that data.

Anyway...I would truly like an appropriate table for my stellar database...So...if anyone has a link for a CSV, XLS, XLSX, or SQL of such a table Please post it...I will continue my search.




posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: tanka418

It seems that not all entries have the id (second last column).

Example:

Row 4038 in exoplanets.csv has KEPID (aka KIC) 8880123

Can be found in "Objects of Interest" db here: exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu...

KOI Name: K03493.01



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 03:47 PM
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originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: tanka418

It seems that not all entries have the id (second last column).

Example:

Row 4038 in exoplanets.csv has KEPID (aka KIC) 8880123

Can be found in "Objects of Interest" db here: exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu...

KOI Name: K03493.01


Thanks.

I actually found that on my own shortly after I posted. Spent much of my time since then downloading several of the tables.

I'm an independent software engineer, so I have some tools that many don't, in this case it's SQLServer, and I've already imported the "confirmed planets" table. I have some of the Kepler survey data that I'm going to import as well.




posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 07:14 AM
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originally posted by: tanka418

originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: tanka418

It seems that not all entries have the id (second last column).

Example:

Row 4038 in exoplanets.csv has KEPID (aka KIC) 8880123

Can be found in "Objects of Interest" db here: exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu...

KOI Name: K03493.01


Thanks.

I actually found that on my own shortly after I posted. Spent much of my time since then downloading several of the tables.

I'm an independent software engineer, so I have some tools that many don't, in this case it's SQLServer, and I've already imported the "confirmed planets" table. I have some of the Kepler survey data that I'm going to import as well.




I'm curious, what are you going to do with all these tables?



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: tanka418

originally posted by: moebius
a reply to: tanka418

It seems that not all entries have the id (second last column).

Example:

Row 4038 in exoplanets.csv has KEPID (aka KIC) 8880123

Can be found in "Objects of Interest" db here: exoplanetarchive.ipac.caltech.edu...

KOI Name: K03493.01


Thanks.

I actually found that on my own shortly after I posted. Spent much of my time since then downloading several of the tables.

I'm an independent software engineer, so I have some tools that many don't, in this case it's SQLServer, and I've already imported the "confirmed planets" table. I have some of the Kepler survey data that I'm going to import as well.




I'm curious, what are you going to do with all these tables?


Armature Astronomy without a telescope....

Seriously, since the advent of the relational database engine 20+ years ago, I've turned into a wee bit of a data hound.

As for the Astronomy... I finally "got around" to building much of what I needed to go "hunting" ET. While I'm sure I won't find a whole lot of aliens, I am sure I can learn quite abit...about where ET must live...course we can also add to that some of "where" he can live.

For instance...mythology tries to tell us that there are/were visitors from the Star Sirius. You, I, and any One else who has looked, even briefly, at the stars can tell us that there is no way there are any advanced lifeforms around Sirius, yet. What most don't know is that there actually is a star, almost hiding behind Sirius that can support the kind of life found on Earth. The star is "Nu-2 Canis Majorus"...it's a bit further away, but is a class "G" star...

I'm sort of basing this bit of research on the notion that when the ancient visitors told early Humans where they were from...the Terrestrials, in typical fashion, got it a bit wrong...

And then of course; I now have a good start on a decent astronomical / stellar database. So far I have; HIP_main, Xhip, A table of exoplanets from NASA/Caltech, and data from the Kepler mission.

I've also been doing the "Math" and have discovered that ET probably doesn't need FTL to get here...at least if he lives long enough...

In any event, this is all kind of exciting...the new data, and the learning from it...using the data to build views of the stars that we might not normally get to "see"...views of the data that result from the kinds of queries I'm writing that combine the various tables in interesting ways...



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 03:26 PM
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Ok, a couple other catalogs you might want to add and consolidate are

HabCat (Jill Tarter and Margaret Turnbull's List of 17,129 Candidate Stars within 450 light years with conditions favorable to habitable planets)

Gliese Nearby Star Catalog

Hipparcos Nearby Stars

Yale Bright Star Catalog


Here is a .ZIP file of a csv which combines all of them



Given that just about every star has a planet it makes sense to add these star catalogs and perhaps "grey them" until a planet is detected but the almost certainly have planets since planet formation is just part of the process of star formation.
edit on 30-1-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-1-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 05:11 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar
Ok, a couple other catalogs you might want to add and consolidate are

HabCat (Jill Tarter and Margaret Turnbull's List of 17,129 Candidate Stars within 450 light years with conditions favorable to habitable planets)

Gliese Nearby Star Catalog

Hipparcos Nearby Stars

Yale Bright Star Catalog


Here is a .ZIP file of a csv which combines all of them



Given that just about every star has a planet it makes sense to add these star catalogs and perhaps "grey them" until a planet is detected but the almost certainly have planets since planet formation is just part of the process of star formation.


Thank you...

I forgot to mention HabCat, which I already have installed. the HabHYG table...not installed, but I was pleasantly surprised to find I already had it. I frequently get "distracted" by paying projects and may forget to return to one of my own...anyway its installed as well.



posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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May be on to something tanka418....




Nu2 Canis Majoris b, (7 CMa b) is a water cloud jovian extrasolar planet orbiting the star Nu2 Canis Majoris, approximately 64.71lys away in the constellation of Canis Major. The planet is thought to be inside the habitable zone with an orbit around its parent star of 1.9AU. It was discovered in 2011 from discoverer Wittenmyer, R. by radial velocity.



posted on Feb, 6 2015 @ 05:23 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
May be on to something tanka418....




Nu2 Canis Majoris b, (7 CMa b) is a water cloud jovian extrasolar planet orbiting the star Nu2 Canis Majoris, approximately 64.71lys away in the constellation of Canis Major. The planet is thought to be inside the habitable zone with an orbit around its parent star of 1.9AU. It was discovered in 2011 from discoverer Wittenmyer, R. by radial velocity.


Thank you man...something new...




posted on Feb, 7 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: Gazrok
May be on to something tanka418....




Nu2 Canis Majoris b, (7 CMa b) is a water cloud jovian extrasolar planet orbiting the star Nu2 Canis Majoris, approximately 64.71lys away in the constellation of Canis Major. The planet is thought to be inside the habitable zone with an orbit around its parent star of 1.9AU. It was discovered in 2011 from discoverer Wittenmyer, R. by radial velocity.


Yes, it should be noted that a large majority of jovian (jupiter sized) exoplanets have water in their atmospheres.

And that one in particular is a good potential target for looking for a habitable exomoon.

Tanka, good luck in your research. I've got to go but I may be back someday.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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A lot of good stuff there!

So I have built my database and have tried to include Kepler planet data. There is still a serious issue...

In the Kepler data there doesn't seem to be any data to relate the parent star of any planets to Hipparcos. The parent star is typically given a "Kepler" identification, and there seem to be no cross reference other than a "tm_name' / "tm_designation", which do not contain the same data.

This "tm_" element contains string data that is typically a "2MASS" identification of some type. One is used in a "missionstars" table, the other in a "keplernames" table...the two tables do not contain the same "tm_" ID's.

What this is doing is preventing me from being able to write an application that will allow a "drill down" on a given Hipparcos star to find any planets, and of course that planet's data.



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