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Mummified 200 year old remains of Buddhist monk found still sitting in the lotus position.

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posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 10:49 AM
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Wow he left the earthly plane in meditation and I hope serenity. Here is the article from the Daily Mail and a Video of the same Mummy from the Daily News YT channel.

I am fascinated by this. I wonder if he was sick and decided to meditate until he passed OR did he die of other circumstances? Either way this would be quite the find.
Not to mention I hope I can die this content some day.
edit on 1/29/2015 by DjembeJedi because: finish idea




posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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That is amazing, he is well preserved! I can't watch the video with sound as I am at work so can you tell me how and where they found him?



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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a reply to: Shepard64

He was found in Mongolia wrapped in animal skins still sitting. So amazing. From the article.

"The human remains are now undergoing forensic examination in capital Ulaanbataar.
Initial speculation is that the mummy could be a teacher of Lama Dashi-Dorzho Itigilov.
Dashi-Dorzho Itigilov, born in 1852, was a Buryat Buddhist Lama of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, best known for the lifelike state of his body."



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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On a side note IF he is the Monk they think he's really only around 100-130 yrs old.. lol a few years off from 200.
edit on 1/29/2015 by DjembeJedi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 02:29 PM
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Nice find! Thanks for posting



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 08:08 PM
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Looks very interesting. Thanks for sharing this!



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 08:31 PM
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Nice find! I'd love to get an up-close look at those remains.
Just FYI and not to burst any idealistic bubbles---the position in which the remains were preserved are not necessarily the position in which he died. After rigor passes the body can be arranged in any position for preservation.



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 10:09 PM
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This was also done in Japan, where monks self mummified themselves in Yokokura temple at about the same time 200yrs ago,they did this by eating nuts and drinking water for 3yrs if I remembered correctly then ate bark and drink sap from a tree used to make lacquer a preservative , in any case it was a long drawn out process.
I am struck by the fact that the Mongolian Monk would use the skin of an animal I guess different communities have different rules?? anyway good find.



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 10:57 PM
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originally posted by: Spider879
This was also done in Japan, where monks self mummified themselves in Yokokura temple at about the same time 200yrs ago,they did this by eating nuts and drinking water for 3yrs if I remembered correctly then ate bark and drink sap from a tree used to make lacquer a preservative , in any case it was a long drawn out process.
I am struck by the fact that the Mongolian Monk would use the skin of an animal I guess different communities have different rules?? anyway good find.


In Mongolia there just isn't much for humans to eat (or use for resources for that matter) besides animals. There are cases where Buddhism is more flexible about that sort of thing, or at least, interpreted to be more flexible. Maybe that was one of those times based upon circumstances. Not that I know the first thing about Buddhism in Mongolia, I'm just guessing here. Besides, didn't the Buddha eat meat?



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 11:15 PM
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originally posted by: redhorse

originally posted by: Spider879
This was also done in Japan, where monks self mummified themselves in Yokokura temple at about the same time 200yrs ago,they did this by eating nuts and drinking water for 3yrs if I remembered correctly then ate bark and drink sap from a tree used to make lacquer a preservative , in any case it was a long drawn out process.
I am struck by the fact that the Mongolian Monk would use the skin of an animal I guess different communities have different rules?? anyway good find.


In Mongolia there just isn't much for humans to eat (or use for resources for that matter) besides animals. There are cases where Buddhism is more flexible about that sort of thing, or at least, interpreted to be more flexible. Maybe that was one of those times based upon circumstances. Not that I know the first thing about Buddhism in Mongolia, I'm just guessing here. Besides, didn't the Buddha eat meat?

Makes sense Mongolia isn't exactly great farm country, I think when Prince Siddhartha became the Buddha or enlightened one he became a Vegan others would follow in his example, however the Monks would steer clear of meat but the layperson would certainly indulge.
edit on 29-1-2015 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)




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