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Utah girl forced to wear a coat over her dress at the dance for violating "dress code"

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posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: HomerinNC
A 'preference' dance is similar to a Sadie Hawkins dance I believe...



Yep. Mitt Romney and Marie Osmond instead of Lil' Abner and Daisy.




posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: Irishhaf
Agreeing to the dress code? likley it was in place when they became a student..just so you know it has nothing to do with agree.
Very lame..have all the weapons you like but don't show any shoulder skin..pathetic and damaging.
A pet peeve of mine is when people have the gall to suggest that when we are forced to do something or accept its agreed on..its not agreement its compliance at best.


edit on 28-1-2015 by vonclod because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-1-2015 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 12:07 PM
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I came on here to bash all of you cause this girl was obviously wearing a slutty dress, and you all are bandwagon hoppers. LOL J/k but then I clicked the link and OMG what a pretty dress and nice for a young lady to wear. It's appropriate. WTF Utah!



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf
Bottom line is you don't have to understand it seems to work for them.


Have you read the dress code?

Where is this dress inappropriate according to the dress code?



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: Vaedur
I came on here to bash all of you cause this girl was obviously wearing a slutty dress, and you all are bandwagon hoppers. LOL J/k but then I clicked the link and OMG what a pretty dress and nice for a young lady to wear. It's appropriate. WTF Utah!


Me too

I'm helping raise my 14 year old granddaughter. I read her school dress code.

Looked at this dress and went WTF.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: Semicollegiate

A "normal" bra has a strap that goes over each shoulder. Shoulderless dresses like the one the young lady was wearing tend to leave the over the shoulder bra strap visible.

I'm fairly sure the 2 inch shoulder strip requirement means that the deltoid muscle and arm pit would be covered. That would ensure that no underwear was visible.

Visible underwear is not formal dress.


I am aware of this stickler of a rule as I'm helping raise my 14 year old granddaughter.

And she has been dress coded for too thin tank straps. Under garments can not be visible. (Apparently it's OK though to tie a knot in the back making the tank top skin tight).

It looks like the top of this dress is some type of heavy lace and possibly see through above the bodice area. Which means an undergarment might be showing or a "peak of skin" if she's wearing a strapless bra.

Still -- I think it's beyond rediculous that this dress was coded at the dance.

This looks like a very pretty girl. I think she was targeted. It definitely happens. A girl who is pretty and popular will get used as an example.




edit on 28-1-2015 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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That school needs a dose Kevin Bacon, Emergency STAT CLEAR


edit on 28-1-2015 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

If there is a dress code and she knew about it, then the school has every right to enforce it.

When inner city schools have uniforms, do you scream just as much when a kid comes in and someone asks them to tuck in their shirt or pull up their pants?

If not, ask yourself why this offends you so much. Could it be just because you don't approve of the idea of modesty in a dress code and you are thinking of religion and women? What if the school asked kids to wear dresses that had only dress code colors and she wore one that wasn't the right color? Would you still scream?



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

The point is that the dress allegedly didn't violate the dress code.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:27 PM
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Hell, The School i was at the dress code for the end of year School dance was , "Wear sensible Clothes"... Frog man suits, Bay City Roller trousers, platform shoes and Gas masks are strictly forbidden. You only got going if yer big brother wasn't wearing the family trouser that night.

How times have changed.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: SkippyBalls
a reply to: ketsuko

The point is that the dress allegedly didn't violate the dress code.


That depends. The top is made of lace and partially sheer down to the bodice. In that sense, it does not conform because it does not cover like a solid material would.

If I were her mother, I would have gotten approval from the school first before purchase just to be safe.
edit on 28-1-2015 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:42 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Anyafaj

If there is a dress code and she knew about it, then the school has every right to enforce it.

When inner city schools have uniforms, do you scream just as much when a kid comes in and someone asks them to tuck in their shirt or pull up their pants?

If not, ask yourself why this offends you so much. Could it be just because you don't approve of the idea of modesty in a dress code and you are thinking of religion and women? What if the school asked kids to wear dresses that had only dress code colors and she wore one that wasn't the right color? Would you still scream?




Where do you get that I'm offended? I never said as much. And I asked about religion because I honestly don't know about the state of Utah. Maybe others who have been there do. I thought it an honest and fair question. Sorry. My daughter DOES wear school uniforms, but she's STILL allowed to wear a nice dress for Homecoming Dance and things like that as long as it isn't of a slutty nature. It doesn't bother me. My daughter dresses modestly anyway as that is HER choice, not mine. She choses her clothes for her dances based on how they look on her and if she likes them, they always are very sedate, but very pretty. Usually thin spaghetti straps, or straps like this dress, with fabric under the straps.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Anyafaj

Sorry then, but that was the implication I picked up.

A dress code is in place and you agree to it before you go to the school. I'm guessing having looked at the dress in the story that the problem was the sheer nature of the lace on top over the bodice.

As a mother who will be dealing with a dress code, I would have asked before purchase realizing I might be skirting the bounds.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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Aside from some basic decency clauses no schools should have strictly enforced dress codes. Its abuse of children. Even if a parent likes that kind of school, children's right to preferences should be absolute constitutional and law.

When I saw that prim and proper but still pretty dress she was wearing, noted the even nicer ones such as off the shoulder, or one shoulder, and when I was young the one shoulder one is what I would have worn. I would decide not sharia, not misogynst religious folk and also not my parents. I am me, they're them and thats it. And clothing is personal.

edit on 28-1-2015 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: Unity_99

In some places, a dress code has nothing to do with religion, misogyny or Shari'a and everything to do with not allowing easy gang ID through the wearing of colors. That is the kind of school I taught in for a few years.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: Unity_99
Aside from some basic decency clauses no schools should have strictly enforced dress codes. Its abuse of children. Even if a parent likes that kind of school, children's right to preferences should be absolute constitutional and law.

When I saw that prim and proper but still pretty dress she was wearing, noted the even nicer ones such as off the shoulder, or one shoulder, and when I was young the one shoulder one is what I would have worn. I would decide not sharia, not misogynst religious folk and also not my parents. I am me, they're them and thats it. And clothing is personal.


Have you hung out on a Jr. High campus lately?

I'm not even talking high school, but grades 6-7-8, starting at age 11.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko




If I were her mother, I would have gotten approval from the school first before purchase just to be safe.


Yes but it is quite a long days drive with the wagon and there are chores to be done.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: SkippyBalls

So what? You're trying to insult me because I can see the school's position on this whether I fully agree with it or not? Or are you just trying to imply that anyone in this day or age that might have a dress code with which you disagree must be living in the dark ages?

Nice use of ad hominem.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Anyafaj

Sorry then, but that was the implication I picked up.

A dress code is in place and you agree to it before you go to the school. I'm guessing having looked at the dress in the story that the problem was the sheer nature of the lace on top over the bodice.

As a mother who will be dealing with a dress code, I would have asked before purchase realizing I might be skirting the bounds.



Meh, yeah, okay, but the dress in the picture didn't seem to be in violation of the dress code that was posted. It would have been a proper tea/cocktail dress in the 1950's and early 1960's--which is what she seemed to be going for as she stated she was a fan of Audrey Hepburn.

Unless it is cut so deep in the back that you can see the crack of her a--I mean, "tops of her legs"--I can't see it being in violation of the code as printed.

Thus, I wonder if there is more to the story.



posted on Jan, 28 2015 @ 02:26 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: Anyafaj

Sorry then, but that was the implication I picked up.

A dress code is in place and you agree to it before you go to the school. I'm guessing having looked at the dress in the story that the problem was the sheer nature of the lace on top over the bodice.

As a mother who will be dealing with a dress code, I would have asked before purchase realizing I might be skirting the bounds.




I accept your apology. No hard feelings. Also, you don't have a choice in dress code. It is forced upon you the second you enter the school. At my daughter's last school, the school security officer, dressed like a sheriff, has you sign. You don't sign, you don't go to school. You don't go to school, you're parents are arrested because you are truant. That how it was at the last county we were at. It is seriously messed up in some towns! In essence, you are forced to sign. Take away choice and make good drones.




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