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Forgotten film of a Yank in a WW2 Spitfire

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posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 05:56 PM
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We owe a BIG thank you to men like him - 18/19 years old, all alone, behind enemy lines, no guns, no escort...and he gladly did it. It was truly the greatest generation in many ways and we owe them respect for what they did for the entire world !
youtu.be...




edit on 25-1-2015 by 727Sky because: ...




posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky




We owe a BIG thank you to men like him


The look on his face was priceless... thanks for that.


I would love to see more of that film he has, I imagine it is very interesting.
edit on 25-1-2015 by tsurfer2000h because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 06:23 PM
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Here is another one from the same man...




posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 05:44 AM
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a reply to: tsurfer2000h

Thank you for posting those.



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Priceless... star and flag for bringing this to our attention. I can just imagine how this old vet must have felt seeing this memory of his life on a screen passing by. These men had such responsibillity at such a young age and experianced so much which probably made them the men they came to be.




posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 07:15 AM
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S&F just for the roar of that RR Merlin Engine...Awesome.



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 07:17 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Thanks for sharing. Yes, we certainly do owe people like him a big debt - thank you.

I love the old Spitfires. What really gets me though is when you read interviews with some of their pilots (who later went onto be test pilots for a whole variety of planes) they all say that plane is their favourite flying experience - the closest to being a bird that they ever experienced.

As some of you are pilots or former pilots, could you explain why that is? Is it just handling / movement or is there more to it?



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 07:14 PM
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originally posted by: Flavian
a reply to: 727Sky

Thanks for sharing. Yes, we certainly do owe people like him a big debt - thank you.

I love the old Spitfires. What really gets me though is when you read interviews with some of their pilots (who later went onto be test pilots for a whole variety of planes) they all say that plane is their favourite flying experience - the closest to being a bird that they ever experienced.

As some of you are pilots or former pilots, could you explain why that is? Is it just handling / movement or is there more to it?


It is the feel of the aircraft which in time becomes an extension of your body. The Spit was beautiful for it's time (unusual for the Brits IMO if you look at current and past designs) but not only was it beautiful but it could out turn and maneuver just about anything that was flying back then. I do not remember which German Ace said this but, "If you want to win the air war give us Spitfires" !

I bet he was not welcome around the war talk camp fires.

I never got to fly a Spitfire. The ones I have been around were beautiful except for some rough fit and finish issues. The holes for the rivets were all hand drilled and alignment was not up to any kind of straight standard; especially at peak production years.. War time and all that so get them out the door to fight.

The ME-109 was not a dog by any means and the popular P-51 was awesome at high altitude for boom and zoom due to its' speed.

The Hurricane was actually an aircraft that shot down more German aircraft than the spit but it could have only been considered nice looking by its' mother.

The photo recon Spit was stripped for speed and fuel... no doubt it was one of the best handling Spits around.. Silly me I always thought the Mosquito was used for Photo recon because it was so fast.... plus I liked the bird..

I had instructors who flew in WW2 both bombers and fighters but I never knew someone who flew Spits in the war. One German friend flew BF-109s for Germany in the war and he was a hoot to talk to.. These guys are a dead and dying breed now as are their aircraft unless some flying Museum takes the time and money to keep the aircraft flyable.. Time passes for everyone and everything.

Their time is past yet hopefully the memories will live on.
Anyway for those who got to see the video and comment thanks.



posted on Jan, 27 2015 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

Thanks for that.

Inspired me to dig out my dad's book he wrote about his experiences in WWII. He was an American who joined the RAF via Canada before the U.S. got involved, around '39, and then transferred to the USAAF based in the UK after Pearl Harbor.

He was, primarily, qualified as a pilot and bombardier for the B-17 and between UK/US stints, flew some 50 missions in the early, bloody air war days... got a silver star... then ferried fighters of all types across the Atlantic and Europe for the remainder of the war... loved the P-51, but had a big love for the Spitfire, not only as a pilot's dream, but because the B-17 crew had their lives saved numerous times by them showing up near the Channel, usually outnumbered against the Luftwafe, and kicked butt and got the shot up B-17s home.

B-17s were awesome machines, too, considering the beating they could take and still fly/land... but they weren't the sleek, sexy fighters.

The stories he had, when we managed to get him to talk, were incredible... the loss staggering... those guys were truly amazing people.

This guy, flying without guns and alone over Germany... wow.




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