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Is Your Smart Phone Harming Your Eyes?

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posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 06:40 PM
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Hello all, during my morning surf I happened across this article and it got my attention for sure. It pertains to using a smart phone to watch videos and full length movies.
According to this news item you can go blind temporally by doing the above. Now we don't own a smart phone so I thought I would post this thread on ATS where we are sure almost everyone owns one.



One London teen, after binge-watching her favourite Netflix programs on her smartphone, looked up and realized she couldn’t see — her eyesight was so bad, she was legally blind. It sounds like an urban legend, but it happened to the teen this past summer. “Her eyes were over-focusing and spasming, and the eye doctor told her she had to stop using her phone to watch Netflix and to read and for Facebook,” said Rene Boucher, whose 16-year-old daughter was legally blind at the height of her problem. Dr. Christina Schropp, Boucher’s daughter’s optometrist, said she’s seeing more patients with similar problems. “We’re seeing a lot more of it as people use their phones to watch videos and do everything else,” she said. “That kind of visual stimulation from a small screen over a long time — the ciliary muscle has to bend to focus, and the closer the object is, the more it has to bend.


This makes me think about peoples health in a whole new way. I am awaiting some reply's from folks whom actually own smart phones.
The full news story can be found here.....
www.lfpress.com...

It is a interesting read, mind you it is MSM at it finest:-)

Any personal experiences pro or anti would be appreciated.

Regards, Iwinder




posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 06:45 PM
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First my sperm count, now my eyes! Is there no end!!



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

Oh, absolutely. My eyes used to be pretty good until I became a injuneer. Now I have astigmatism and I'm a touch nearsighted, which is a total ripoff, as they always told me you'd become farsighted when your eyes froze.

Well, let me tell you - your eyes set wherever you've been using them. I was doing a lot of real close work during the years my lens hardened the last of the way, and I stuck with mid-range to close-in vision.

It happens to kids, too, you get accommodative spasm, and your eyes will "stick" at cell phone distance given time.

There are ways to reduce that, wearing reading glasses to use the phone will keep your eyes from pulling in the focus so tightly, also 'sunning' will help keep your eyes from elongating to meet the perceived demand for a lot of close work.

NASA had a machine called the Accommotrak that was supposed to help you spend a few minutes a day countering the spasm effects, I know they built some and tested it and had good results but it never seemed to take off. I always wanted to see one in the Walmart or something next to the blood pressure machine.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:09 PM
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It makes a lot of sense to watch TV on your phone, when it's likely you have a big screen in your living room.

/sarcasm

I know people who $pend on data plans to watch hockey on their phones... same thing... big huge LCD just sitting in their living room.

It's a status thing I believe, like "look what I can do on my phone!"

meh. Not surprising it would affect your sight after a while. I would think computers would have the same affect but at least your average laptop screen is what, 15" ?.... not 3 or 4.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:20 PM
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a reply to: HIWATT

i remember i always used to hear "watch too much tv and you will go blind" as a kid. now every kid has a portable tv.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:45 PM
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Don't know Bro..I got an old flip phone.No trust in"smart phones"..
edit on 24-1-2015 by greydaze because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-1-2015 by greydaze because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:47 PM
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originally posted by: DrakeINFERNO
a reply to: HIWATT

i remember i always used to hear "watch too much tv and you will go blind" as a kid. now every kid has a portable tv.


I used to hear it was something else that made you blind. I guess I must have done it until I needed glasses.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:57 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam




Well, let me tell you - your eyes set wherever you've been using them. I was doing a lot of real close work during the years my lens hardened the last of the way, and I stuck with mid-range to close-in vision. It happens to kids, too, you get accommodative spasm, and your eyes will "stick" at cell phone distance given time. There are ways to reduce that, wearing reading glasses to use the phone will keep your eyes from pulling in the focus so tightly, also 'sunning' will help keep your eyes from elongating to meet the perceived demand for a lot of close work.


Very interesting, up till today I have never heard of this problem.
Live and learn they say, hell yes I'm learning from ATS and all the superb posts!

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

On top of which, most glasses may be made incorrectly, and may cause progressive myopia instead of fixing it.

Your eyes have some really impressive means of adapting to what they think you need, both in short and long time frames.

What you DON'T want is for them to adapt to close range and stay that way, and I think we're going to see a lot of that due to cell phones and tablets.

Sunning helps - your eyes make an enzyme that's destroyed by light that encourages the eye to lengthen slowly over time. Thus, you do a lot of indoor work and that enzyme just builds. Your eyes slowly elongate to adapt to cave life. If you blast some light in there occasionally, it'll slow that down.

It helps spasm to look away every few minutes - just pause the movie or leave the website be and focus on the horizon a few times an hour.

And it helps to wear reading glasses even if you're young or don't really need them - it'll reduce the accommodative reaction to something reasonable.

The other thing with the glasses I can't explain without a pad to draw on - basically the back of your eye is a hemisphere and the plane along which the image focuses is ALSO a hemisphere. If it lands on the retina and pretty much matches, there's no tendency to change the eye shape.

BUT. If you wear glasses, there's three ways that lens can be produced. One, the focal plane of the image can be steeper than the eye's back and be tangent at the fovea, but inside the eye at the periphery. This is the better of three choices. The retina has the ability to detect where the focus lies - it's a phase trick - and if the peripheral focus is inside the retina, it'll tend to not elongate the eye. Over time, your eye will slightly reshape to be more far sighted to try to bring that pre-retinal peripheral focus in.

Two, the focal plane of the lens will match the eye's shape at the back. This is the second best selection. Your eye will tend not to reshape at all.

Three, the focal plane of the lens can fall behind the eye but be tangent at the fovea. This will appear, like #1, to be a "good" lens fitting. But the retinal periphery can tell the focus is falling behind the eye at the edges. So again, that chemical signal will be produced to make the eye want to elongate to fit the image it's getting. This is how you get progressive myopia. Your eyes elongate over a number of months, you go to the eye doctor, and he fits you with another set of stronger lenses, again tangent at the fovea but behind the eye at the periphery. So your eyes try to compensate again by lengthening out more, you become more nearsighted, go to the eye doctor etc etc.

They actually have a way to fit you that puts the focus inside the eye at the edges. You see just as well, because it's just as "in focus" at the fovea, but the focal plane lies inside the eye at the edges. It stops the progression and over time can reverse some of the near sightedness. But it's not something you can get easily, because it's easier to grind the lenses the other way.

And now you know the rest of the story.

edit on 24-1-2015 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:25 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

maybe it was tv made you stupid, which makes sense since i see a lot more stupid people than blind people.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

Look away from any Screen every 15 - 20 minutes or so. Advice collected many years back , when PCs first came into being



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 10:10 PM
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I haven't noticed my eyes hurting but I do know that if I use my iPhone at night to read, it keeps me up for at least two hours. When I choose a physical book, I'm ready for sleep in a half hour. Supposedly it has something to do with the blue light iirc. It has different effects on the body than the typical warm light golden light sources. S + F. Last year there was a case where a man suffered retinal detachment from using his smartphone in the dark...



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

As a smartphone user and an engineer, I can agree with the smart phone hurting your eyes (as does any bright technology object).

Part of the problem is that everyone I see using one has it pressed up really close to their eyes to see - focusing on something that close for long periods of time isn't the best in the world (if you look at them while they are doing it, they almost look cross-eyed). Combine with using the phone in a dimly lit environment (I can't see the screen when the sun is out), and your eyes will take a hit.

Outside the phone use, I have to watch it with my work - I sit in front of a computer everyday, working on brightly colored applications, with two monitors too close to my eyes. I can feel my eyes spasm, and what I actually have to do is either look away from my screen, or close my eyes (and put a hand over them to keep out the light) until the spasm goes away. I also developed the ability to type with my eyes closed.

Now, I'd love to assume that because I have all recessive traits in the family, that it means I won't have to wear glasses, but I've got a hunch the longer I work with technology, the more likely it will be that I will need them.

-fossilera



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: Iwinder

Yes. Smart phones mess your eyes up with over exposure. Same with all brightly lit devices. Just take a break and rest your eyes now and then.

Eta: I've found that lowering the brightness of the screen helps.
edit on 25-1-2015 by Wide-Eyes because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 08:10 AM
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Is my smartphone hurting my eyes? Not mine, how about yours? Well if you weren't looking up all that pornography!



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 08:59 AM
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Interesting info there thanks!

I'll just add another conspiracy Morsel if I may,being as I'm on a CT site lol..I read some random info the other week and must say,I have no way of knowing if this is true,but given the bombardment in all areas (against us) it may well have credence.

it mentioned,how when focusing on the eye phone, that it causes your view to 'cross' and this may well impact the third eye? I have grossly oversimplified my recollection of the 'theory' ,maybe more can be gleaned into this?

I have never been a fancy phone person and always thought "phones are just necessary for calls-with no frills" anyway, I have recently inherited an eye phone and it is quite a strain on the old mince pies, so maybe there is something to this?




posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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originally posted by: HIWATT
It makes a lot of sense to watch TV on your phone, when it's likely you have a big screen in your living room.

/sarcasm

I know people who $pend on data plans to watch hockey on their phones... same thing... big huge LCD just sitting in their living room.

It's a status thing I believe, like "look what I can do on my phone!"

meh. Not surprising it would affect your sight after a while. I would think computers would have the same affect but at least your average laptop screen is what, 15" ?.... not 3 or 4.


Good points, We witnessed this coming step by step without actually realizing the dangers involved. Many years ago my Niece and Nephew were so involved with their new smart phones Christmas morning they would not even converse at all.
They were aged about 7 years and 9 years thereabouts.

Next it was our Neighbours across the street from us, Mom and Dad did a road trip to the East Coast and left Junior to his own devises. Aged about 17 years old so you know they are doing a party at some point, indeed he did have a party!

Funny thing to watch is all his friends ended up in the middle of the front yard and street and every one of them was holding a smartphone and besides the laughter there was Zero talking (conversing)

They were standing in groups of circles or semi circles texting and sending videos to each other. Looking out our front window it looked like some kind of satanic ritual going on. The only thing missing was the black hooded garb and the chanting.

I pray that the folks who read this thread keep an eye on their children's time spent on their smartphone.


Regards, Iwinder




edit on 26-1-2015 by Iwinder because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 06:50 PM
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originally posted by: DrakeINFERNO
a reply to: HIWATT

i remember i always used to hear "watch too much tv and you will go blind" as a kid. now every kid has a portable tv.


Yep a micro portable tv that is in use every minute possible whilst the kid is awake.....scary thoughts indeed.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 07:02 PM
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Mark my words when these kids reach their late 40's and beyond, deaths by way of falling down stairs at home, or simply slipping on the floor at work, will balloon to unheard of proportions. Millennial's have spent far too little time getting bumps and bruises during their childhoods, meaning the bones in their bodies are not strong and may as well be chicken bones, due to all the "seat time" they built up, in comparison to previous more active generations. Here is a study, showing that such is a very possible outcome for Millennial Public Health:

Essex University, studied how strong 315, 10-year-olds were in 2008 and then compared them with 309 children in the same age, using data collected in 1998. They found the following:

-The number of sit-ups a 10-year-olds could do declined by 27.1%, between 1998 and 2008
-Arm strength fell by 26% and grip strength by 7%, between 1998 and 2008
-One in 20 children in 1998 could not hold their own weight, when hanging from wall bars. In 2008 one in 10 could not do so and another 10% of that 2008 cohort refused to even try the activity

Now add in neck and back problems from texting and you have huge public health disaster on the horizon. So, as I said above, basically a fall down a flight of stairs or a heavy box falling on them, when they get older, is far more likely to kill them INSTANTLY than in previous generation. Their bones have sustained far less impact over the same amount of time, versus people born just 2 decades earlier. Their bones will be as fragile as porcelain when they reach 40 years old and whats REALLY funny is that insurance companies currently raise rates for people over 40. What will happen when these kids hit 40, based on the current polices? Honestly they should be completely uninsurable.

Being blind too is just the icing on the cake.



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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Buy a tablet and get skype. The screen is bigger! Get a purse holder to sling across your back. Is that a little too gay? Put some manly artwork on it. Hey man, I'm getting older and can't see really well anymore. I'm just giving alternatives.



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