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Scientists Can Now Record Dreams, The Future Of Thought & Dream Manipilation

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posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:25 AM
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So scientists have managed to record dreams, they predict that in the future they may be able to plant a dream as well. So it looks like may have a Total Recall type of future at some point in time. I think this may take the place of entertainment as well as the worlds of our self created dreams replaces entertainment during our nights rest.

Also a point to note scientist have found a way using drugs to make what is percieved as 1000 years into 8 hours which is similar to having a nights rest.
www.abovetopsecret.com...
So if technologies are combined one could essentially live out 1000 years each night living in a world of ones own design through lucid dreaming.

So if you could use this technology to record, manipulate, and program your own dreams would you?
Would you like to design your own dream world?
What would your designed dream world be like?
Would you change laws of physics in your world, if so how?
In what ways do you think this technology could aid our future civilization?











Scientists decode contents of dreams
They are our some of our most private and also easily forgotten experiences, but scientists have now worked out how to tell what we are dreaming about.

The Japanese researchers managed to decode the dreams of a group of volunteers and pinpointed when they were dreaming about such things as cars and women. They scanned the brains of three male volunteers as they slept to monitor changes in activity which could be related to the content of their dreams. They also monitored electrical patterns in the men's brain waves, so that they could wake them up whenever the signals indicated that they had begun dreaming. Each time the participants awoke they were asked what they had dreamt about before being allowed to go back to sleep. The process was repeated across several days until 200 reports had been collected from each volunteer.

Researchers reported that while some of the dreams were out of the ordinary -- for example a discussion with a famous actor -- most involved more mundane experiences from everyday life. From the dream accounts they picked out 20 of the most commonly occurring themes, such as "car", "man", "woman" and "computer", and gathered pictures which represented each category. The participants were then asked to view the images while their brains were scanned a second time.

By comparing the second set of brain activity data with the recordings made just before the volunteers had been woken up, the researchers were able to identify distinctive patterns in three key brain regions which help us process what our eyes see. They also found that activity in a number of other brain regions with more specialised roles in visual processing, for example in helping us recognise objects, varied depending on the content of the dreams. Finally, they built a computer model which could predict whether or not each of the selected themes was present in the participants' dreams.

Yukiyasu Kamitani of the ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories in Kyoto, who led the study, told Nature News: "By analysing the brain activity during the nine seconds before we woke the subjects, we could predict whether a man is in the dream or not, for instance, with an accuracy of 75 to 80 per cent."

Speaking at the Society for Neuroscience annual conference last week, the scientists said their findings indicate that patterns of activity in certain visual areas of the brain are the same whether we are awake or dreaming. Dr Katamani added: "Our study shows that during dreaming, some brain areas show activity patterns similar to those elicited by pictures of related contents. "Thus, using a database of picture-elicited brain activity and a pattern recognition algorithm, we can read out, or decode, what a person might be seeing from brain scans during dreaming.

"In this study we were able to decode only basic object category information, but the method could be extended to decode more dynamic and emotional aspects of dreams."


edit on 24-1-2015 by FormOfTheLord because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:36 AM
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This isn't exactly recording dreams. This is simply analyzing brain signals while the person is dreaming, and comparing them to data gathered while awake. They had to get a series of baselines from each individual before in order to even be able to do that, otherwise the data gathered by the sleeping individual would be meaningless.

It's interesting research, sure, but isn't "dream recording" in any way, shape, or form...



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:40 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
This isn't exactly recording dreams. This is simply analyzing brain signals while the person is dreaming, and comparing them to data gathered while awake. They had to get a series of baselines from each individual before in order to even be able to do that, otherwise the data gathered by the sleeping individual would be meaningless.
It's interesting research, sure, but isn't "dream recording" in any way, shape, or form...


Did you even watch the vids I posted? They recorded dreams while someone was sleeping in the BBC vid.

However they do it they are able to map out what you were dreaming about. So yes they are recording your brain dream and playing back on a screen for you to look at later.
edit on 24-1-2015 by FormOfTheLord because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:42 AM
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Don't show my wife's sisters mine !
Just saying .
edit on 24-1-2015 by Denoli because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:59 AM
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a reply to: FormOfTheLord

Its obviously a very long way away from manipulating our brains and prying into our deepest thoughts - thank god.

I have to be honest ,with this kind of research because I can see a military application or two, but I feel that the money and researchers efforts could be spent on other uses we need immediately, if not yesterday.

I know I sound like a dinosaur, but when are we going to deal with cancer which should have been within our grasp twenty years ago? A lot of other things that benefit our bodies seem more important than our dreams. (which I like to keep private not of corporate interet).



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 05:49 AM
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Let them .. my dreams alone would terrify them .. my nightmares would push them over the edge of the abyss ..



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: FormOfTheLord

All i can say is they better stay away form my dreams or i can see me ether being locked up in a loony-bin or incarcerated in some other form of government institution.


Example: Not that long ago i had a dream where i was a Cheese and Tomato Sandwich and the world was taking bites out of me. That reeks of symbology if you as me. LoL



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:27 AM
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I was thinking more along the lines of having a personal home device to record your own dreams, and manipulate your own dreams as well.

Think of it as your own personal future Total Recall machine.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 09:17 AM
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a reply to: FormOfTheLord

Though the whole idea of what they're doing and will be able to do in the future sounds neat, but I just see it as bad in the long run. Many people will get in trouble with this, as well as the whole idea will create a new form of addiction.

First thing I see wrong is the addictive capabilities of being able to manipulate your own dreams like that, and disappear into your mind for long periods of time. It reminds me of a game I played not too long ago called "Shadowrun Returns". In the game, you come across a bunch of people that at first glance look like heroine junkies. But they're not on heroine. They're addicted to chips implanted into their heads that allow them to live in different experiences.

shadowrun.wikia.com...

People who are addicted are called "chipheads". Now if we had that sort of technology, to create our own worlds in our dreams, and make 8 hours seem like 1000 years, I'm pretty certain many people will become addicted to it. They won't want to live in the real world, when they can "live" in their dream world. I mean, if people are willing to inject krokodil into their bodies, or course they'll get hooked on this.

Second thing that worries me is the way they'd use it to control everyone. For example, Expat888 talks about how his/her dreams would "push them over the edge of the abyss". I know lots of people that claim to have very messed up dreams, or at least very surreal. So how long until someone gets locked up, being dubbed "insane", or "at risk" because of how their dreams are?? I have very interesting dreams on a regular basis, for example, one where some innate power was awakened inside me, and the government feared it. When they sent a bunch of troops into my house to get me, I realized I had insanely powerful telekinetic powers, like this:

www.youtube.com...

So, in the end, I caused all of their heads to explode. XD Sure, the dream was fun, but how long until I'm locked up for being "mentally unstable"??

Don't get me wrong, the idea that we can do this sort of thing is really neat, but I just can't help but feel it'll be bad in the long run.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 09:20 AM
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didn't he who shall not be named say this tech was a central part of his story. the whole sleep on it phrase he would say.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 09:48 AM
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a reply to: FormOfTheLord

I would think that we need to be able to control the dream and what we do in it. What you're proposing sound extremely dangerous, like waking up and being afraid of your wife and kids because you had a dream that you weren't able/allowed to image yourself.

I might be wrong, but I think what drives a dream is how you feel about interconnected images and concepts (which are connected by their similarities.) So if I see some pre-programed mental image, and I am unable to move the dream and myself in the direction I know and expect, based upon my feelings, and concepts, it would do serious damage - maybe even rewrite memory. (Since dreams are basically composite memories guided by your feelings towards them.)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: FormOfTheLord

Good. They're going to get the piss knocked out of them if they ever figure out what they're #ing with.

Of course, there are major confounding factors in experiments involving the mind ie: the observed being observed and knowing they are observed.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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So something else Astro said is true. They can record your dreams.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: Denoli
Don't show my wife's sisters mine !
Just saying .

Or your wife.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:12 PM
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originally posted by: CallYourBluff

originally posted by: Denoli
Don't show my wife's sisters mine !
Just saying .

Or your wife.


Or your best friend lol.oooh boy.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:53 PM
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That's really awesome but I was sorta hoping they'd be able to record what we 'see' in our dreams (our eyes are closed so that wouldn't be truly considered 'seeing'). Regardless though, that's an impressive feat. Neuro-sciences have really advanced in recent years. Soon they'll unlock the entirety of our brains.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:33 PM
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I once had a large dose of shrooms along with a MAO inhibitor.... dream worlds are only fun if you are in control, let me tell you that. Even just a day of dreaming can seem long if you get stuck in a thought loop :S



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: yuppa
So something else Astro said is true. They can record your dreams.


Many things he said have made their way to the msn these past few months.

My question is how do i make an investment in this new industry which will make me better off financially?



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 07:18 PM
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I thought this was very interesting, and has everything to do with recording and controlling dreams for personal use.



lifeboat.com...

By 2050, and likely sooner, you will be able to buy a BCI device that records all your dreams in their entirety. This will be done in one of two ways. One method would be to use distributed nanobots less than a micrometer in diameter to spread throughout the brain and monitor the activation patterns of neurons.

By this point, cognitive science will have advanced enough to know which neural activation patterns correspond to which sensory experiences. This has already been done with cats (using electrodes, not nanobots), where researchers led by scientist Garrett Stanley were able to extrapolate what a cat was seeing merely by monitoring the neurons of its visual cortex. Here are some images they obtained:




The next steps will be to increase the resolution, add monitoring of emotions, sounds, and smells, and make it safe for human use. An alternative route, if nanobots are still not ready for commercial deployment by 2050, is to have minimally invasive surgery where tiny holes, no larger than a grain of sand, are drilled in the skull. (Small price to pay, I’d say. And if drilling holes in the skull, even holes too small to do any damage, bothers you, then wait for the nanobots.)

Electronic nanofibers could be routed through these holes from a port on the outside to neurons throughout the brain. The holes could be protected by a plastic membrane, ensuring that no foreign particles could pass through them into the brain. The access ports on the scalp would be compatible with a BCI headset designed to monitor activity in specific neural groups and selectively stimulate neurons according to a program.

A major challenge, of course, would be to get FDA approval for such a device. The therapeutic and practical benefits of a high-resolution BCI device are so large that if it can be shown not to cause any damage or negative side effects to its user, approval seems likely.

If the BCI device offers input to the brain as well as recording output, then dreams could be played back too. A Dream Machine would let us show our dreams to others. If we know which neural activation pattern corresponds to which perceptions (sight, sounds, etc.), it’s not a huge leap to selectively stimulate neurons to produce customized dream scenarios, or even enter the dreams of others in action. (In ascending order of technological difficulty.)

Manipulating our dreams… how many thousands of years has humanity waited for this? Here’s a frequent kind of background I see in my dreams:




…other things I see include gigantic academic complexes, cliff networks, green hills overlooking sunny blue bays, and many others. I’m sure you can imagine hundreds of scenarios from your dreams, many of which seem so fleeting. But it won’t necessarily be that way forever.

The possible societal effects of a Dream Machine would be immense. Dream recordings and recreations would offer an opportunity to:

1) Validate or refute Freudian theories about the connections of dreams to subconscious or conscious psychological states.

2) Create a “science of dreams” or oneirology, that organizes all available dream data, breaks up dreams into categories, studies which type of people get which dreams, etc.

3) Create a “dream entertainment industry” where people choose to have customized dreams, with features like greater visual complexity or richness of colors, or even massively multiplayer dreams.

4) The possible rise of “dream celebrities” — people who freely upload their dreams for others to examine, followed by a positive reception. People might lead double lives — boring accountant by day, world-famous lucid dreamer by night. Some people might even get paid for their dreams.

5) Uncover the hidden world of dreams that barely rise above our subconscious. People tend to have several dreams per night, but remember only one or two. We experience these dreams when they happen, our brain just neglects to transfer the information content into long-term memory. (The reasons for this are likely evolutionary — we would get confused about reality if we remembered too many of our dreams.) Imagine if we could record all these dreams and play them back at will. With enough storage density (molecular memory), you could even store your dreams on a pendant around your neck.

6) Convert dream-worlds into real-worlds; amusement parks based on dreams, or utility fog banks that quickly morph in response to a given personal or collective dreamscape. Or vice versa: turn real world places and people into dream objects.

7) In general, blur the line between dreams and reality by making dreams more tangible, manipulable, interactive, customizable, and social. Bring dreams “in from the cold”. Make dreams as mysterious, colorful, productive, foreign, erotic, or mundane as you want them to be.

Considering these possibilities, the first thing that makes me nervous is that people would institute inappropriate regulations over the use of this technology. For instance, some groups of people might hate the idea of removing some of the “mystery of dreams” (like how modern biology ostensibly dispels some of the mystery of life, or modern physics dispels some of the mystery of nature) through technology. As someone who is socially liberal, barring sufficiently negative externalities, I’d advocate light regulation on this technology. Heavy regulation should be saved for more dangerous technologies such as synthetic biology and molecular nanotechnology.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:02 PM
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No way.

They are fools for thinking it's as simple as this. Dreams are not simply fragments of our imagination, we're experiencing subtler realms with subtler bodies.

They surely don't have technology to interact with the etheric or the astral.

That is the type of technology I imagine highly advanced ET's to possess. Which they're also reputed to possess in some abduction accounts I might add.

These scientists are like children trying to harness and or control something they only understand in a most rudimentary way.
They're in flatland and this subject is 3D.




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