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GOP rep.: Keep minimum wage low ‘for minorities’ who aren’t worth more than $7 an hour

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posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 10:38 AM
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a reply to: Flatfish

the poster I was replying to made it seem we were discussing unemployment and that was what my comments were directed to.

Sorry for any misunderstanding.




posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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originally posted by: MOMof3

You a good person.


Don't let it get around, I have a reputation I need to uphold.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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What a truck load of unmitigated BS! The author of the story provided by the OP, DAVID EDWARDS, puts "Minorities" in his headline and that word was not uttered ONE TIME.

Pure emotional propaganda. But the Proggies eat it up and then cry for more. They're like baby birds waiting for the Gov't to throw up in their mouths to feed them and they're always asking for more. Nothing but disgusting wastes of flesh and to top it off, they're good at wasting not only money, but wasting valuable oxygen.

I say we Carbon Tax them into oblivion!
They deserve it. It's one of their babies after all.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: NavyDoc

You really have an obsession about class don't you? First of all, most college students are middle class and parents save for decades now to send their kids to college.

Internships are usually college kids trying to get work experience and some internships even earn them course credits towards their degree. Thus, they gain value for their internship even if that value is not cash, although the vast majority of internships do also pay a wage or stipend. Usually an internship is a summer or part-time gig.

As described above, many of these interns are go-getters who take a second, paying job to support themselves as they gain the experience and exposure that the internship provides. Individuals with such drive usually do well in life, as opposed to those who want everything easy.



Really? It would appear that many, many unpaid interns may have a completely different opinion.

www.economist.com...

Where it gets interesting is in the private sector. In America, the Supreme Court ruled in 1947 that the Portland Terminal Company, a railway firm, was justified in not paying its trainee brakemen during a seven-day course that they were obliged to take before beginning their paid employment. The trainees were “work[ing] for their own advantage”, the Court ruled. More recently, the Department of Labour has come up with six conditions that firms must meet when offering unpaid internships. The trickiest, from the company’s point of view, are those that state that the internship must be “similar to training which would be given in an educational environment”; that the intern must not displace ordinary employees; and that the firm must not benefit from the work the intern carries out.

By these criteria, most unpaid internships in the private sector in America look decidedly iffy. It is a similar story in other countries. British interns at profit-making firms must be paid the minimum wage unless the internship makes up part of their degree course or they are doing short-term “shadowing”, or observing. (An annual scheme at The Economist's London offices pays £6,000, or $9,650, for three months.) Italy and Spain have recently introduced special minimum wages for apprentices. Firms that fail to pay are in growing danger of being taken to court. Last year Fox Searchlight, a film distributor, lost a case against two former unpaid interns who had worked on the film “Black Swan”. A string of companies in the media and fashion industries, from NBC to Donna Karan, have had to settle similar cases. The tide may be turning against unpaid internships. Except, that is, when it comes to the politicians who set the minimum wage: they are under no obligation to pay it.


www.marketplace.org...

“I tend to sort of breeze over the ones that don’t pay, because I don’t think it’s really fair," says freshman Brittney Wade, who’s looking for a summer position in public relations. “Yes, we’re doing it for an experience, and that is valuable to us, but I don’t think there should be free labor enforced when it comes to internships.”

A lot of people are starting to agree. Last spring a federal judge threw water on the long tradition of the unpaid internship. He ruled that Fox Searchlight Pictures had broken the law by failing to pay interns who did the work of paid employees. The ruling forced employers everywhere to rethink their policies.

“Any time you post an ad for an unpaid internship, you’re writing ‘Poor people need not apply’ in big letters at the top,” says Mikey Franklin, founder of the Fair Pay Campaign to end unpaid internships.

If the fairness argument hasn’t been persuasive, the threat of lawsuits has been. Magazine publisher Condé Nast just settled a suit brought by some of its former unpaid interns. Rather than start paying, the company shut down its internship program altogether. Many other companies—from Viacom to the New York Times to the nonprofit Lean In—have opted to pay at least minimum wage.


touch.latimes.com.../-1/article/p2p-81304615/

A former unpaid intern at “Late Show With David Letterman” has filed a class-action suit accusing CBS and Letterman’s production company, Worldwide Pants, of violating minimum-wage and overtime laws.

Mallory Musallam’s lawsuit, filed on behalf of six years’ worth of unpaid “Late Show” interns, alleges that the defendants intentionally minimized labor costs by giving work to unpaid interns instead of having paid employees stay extra hours or hiring additional employees to do it, according to a court filing posted by Deadline.

As a “Late Show” intern from approximately September through December 2008, Musallam typically worked more than 40 hours a week and did not receive any pay or academic or vocational training, the suit says. Her tasks, it says, included “research for interview material, deliver film clips from libraries, running errands, faxing, scanning, operating the switchboard and other similar duties.”

The suit seeks back pay, interest and attorneys’ fees.


And the lawsuits just keep piling up...

www.hollywoodreporter.com...

www.huffingtonpost.com...

NBCUniversal Settles Lawsuit With Unpaid Interns For $6.4 Million


www.newsweek.com...

Apparently, I'm not alone.
edit on 23-1-2015 by Flatfish because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 11:16 AM
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Bottom line is;

No matter what anyone does for a living, if it doesn't pay enough to live on, someone else is having to pick up the slack.

I don't care if you clean toilets, shine shoes or sharpen pencils, if you're having to supplement your full time salary with social assistance, it's corporate welfare. Plain & simple.

For those who continue to insist that a sub-standard minimum wage is only meant to be a stepping stone to higher wages, if you really believe that then make it so by limiting that sub-standard wage to employees below the age of 18.

How simple is that?



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 11:23 AM
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a reply to: Flatfish

Bottom line is all jobs are not created equal.

They never have been. They never will be.

There is, and always has been a difference between skilled, and unskilled labor.

Someone bagging groceries doesn't deserve the same pay as a doctor.

Someone flipping burgers doesn't deserve the same pay as pilot.

Wage is determined by the work performed. Not based on what people think they are worth.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Flatfish

Bottom line is all jobs are not created equal.

They never have been. They never will be.

There is, and always has been a difference between skilled, and unskilled labor.

Someone bagging groceries doesn't deserve the same pay as a doctor.

Someone flipping burgers doesn't deserve the same pay as pilot.

Wage is determined by the work performed. Not based on what people think they are worth.


it is amazing that such as simple idea is apparently like trying to discuss particle physics with some these people.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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Reading this thread really makes me grateful for my situation.

Enjoy your never ending search for prosperity!



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

Walmart has always supported raising the minimum wage, because the majority of their customers are minimum wage people.

You see they are a huge company and can afford the wage ripples from an increase in minimum wage because it creates an easy sales increase. The problem is the little guy can't afford the wage ripple, they can't easily absorb the cost increase, so they have to raise their prices, and their customers often go to the big guy who can afford the ripple and raise prices gradually to offset the expense.

The MINIMUM WAGE is ALWAYS the MINIMUM WAGE! The cost of living just adjusts around it. The middle class doesn't get a wage bump from the MINIMUM WAGE increasing, so the middle class gradually joins the working poor. Every time a MINIMUM WAGE increase happens our country's middle class gets eaten up by rising expenses, but no one cares to see it.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Flatfish

Bottom line is all jobs are not created equal.

They never have been. They never will be.

There is, and always has been a difference between skilled, and unskilled labor.

Someone bagging groceries doesn't deserve the same pay as a doctor.

Someone flipping burgers doesn't deserve the same pay as pilot.

Wage is determined by the work performed. Not based on what people think they are worth.


And to my knowledge, no one in this thread has advocated for such.

No one, has stated that sackers or burger flippers be paid like doctors and lawyers.

I'ts hard to even imagine that anyone, other than yourself, would even suggest such a ludicrous scenario.

On the hand, for you it seems more and more to be par for the course.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

I think minimum wage should be raised to 20 dollars an hour,free health care , retirement pension of a 100 percent pay after 20 years ,one month paid vacation every year , 5 percent pay raises every year to keep up with inflation , free college for thier kids,one month of sick time, 4 day work week have I left anything out oh and if your African American you should get reperatiin pay also and 20 acres and a free car since mules are no longer used!
edit on 23-1-2015 by tiberius10721 because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-1-2015 by tiberius10721 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: Flatfish

Yeah they have.

That 'living' wage bull snip.



Ya want to help your fellow man ?

FIX THE MONEY!



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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This is really about guns and freedom.

Suppose Person A hire Person B. Both agree that $6 an hour is fair. They are both happy with the deal.

Then the Government finds out, and sends an agent with a gun to Person's A's home. Person A must give the Government money or be forced at gun point to live in a cage.

It's the Government's position that Person B is too stupid to negotiate a fair wage for himself.

Eventually Person A decides to move his business and his money someplace else.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:50 PM
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originally posted by: tiberius10721
a reply to: olaru12

I think minimum wage should be raised to 20 dollars an hour,free health care , retirement pension of a 100 percent pay after 20 years ,one month paid vacation every year , 5 percent pay raises every year to keep up with inflation , free college for thier kids,one month of sick time, 4 day work week!


That sounds like the Netherlands, Denmark, Germany and Sweden.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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a reply to: Jamie1

It's sad when I was growing up I never worried about how much minimum wage was at Carl's junior when I was working there because I knew that job was just a stepping stone to a better future. Make the minimum wage as high as you want at a fast food joint if a establishment is to expensive I just won't eat there I can cook a great hamburger at home and make my own fries and it will be healthier ! Think about what I just posted i represent the middle class in America my income is around 60 thousand a year used to be more but I got tired of paying more taxes when I worked overtime! So be my guest raise the cost of everything I have noticed me and my freinds are all cooking more at home lately! You can only cut so many pieces out of a pie economics 101 they taught that to us in school back in the day instead of emotions 101🙈



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: Flatfish
And to my knowledge, no one in this thread has advocated for such.

No one, has stated that sackers or burger flippers be paid like doctors and lawyers.

I'ts hard to even imagine that anyone, other than yourself, would even suggest such a ludicrous scenario.


Actually it many ways it is being suggested, time and again, in these threads, even if not put in those exact words.

They deserve a "living wage" is the refrain heard over and over again. No they don't. They deserve a wage that is appropriate to the work that is being done. If that wage isn't enough for them to live on, then it's their responsibility to put in the effort to find work that does pay enough for them to live, or pick up a second job.

"Doctors and lawyers" might be a bit of hyperbole that crops up time and again, but the principle is sound. "Office clerks and ditch diggers" might be a better comparison. Why should the person mopping the floor at McBurgers in vetween cigarette breaks (when they bother to turn up to work be brought up to the same level of pay as the office clerk who had to gain at least basic qualifications and managed to fight off all other candidates for the job, or the guy with the shovel who breaks his back for 8 hours a day in the boiling sun to do a job that most people couldn't handle for 30 minutes?

The fact that you can't see why it isn't a ludicrous scenario to propose is more a reflection on you than on the other poster.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

Honestly without my usual sarcasm I think buisness owners should try giving employees exactly what they want and see what happens that would kill this argument forever! This is the mistake that conservatives are making stop fighting the left and let them have their way with everything. It's kinda like the parent who gets tired of telling their child not to stick a fork in an electrical socket sometimes you just have to let them experience it themselves!

I really don't understand why conservative politicians just don't quit jobs and go home and spend time with their families I would!
edit on 23-1-2015 by tiberius10721 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 01:12 PM
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Hurry we need more conservatives to get in here and pat each others backs! We also need more liberals to demand more money without effort.

These bi-partisan bickerfests are just too funny.

We all get rammed by the same dong. Some harder than others that's for sure.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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originally posted by: neo96
a reply to: Flatfish

Yeah they have.

That 'living' wage bull snip.


FYI, making a "living wage" means you might be able to afford to go to the doctor, not that you should be paid like one.



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: EvillerBob

A living wage is what keeps people off welfare. I would rather pay someone a "living wage" who can pay taxes and be independent of welfare programs. Of course, corporations and businesses like government welfare for that reason.

When I was a certified nurse aide, I really could do something with those dime raises every five years. And it was not just me, it was all the aides.







 
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