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A Terrifying Prehistoric Frilled Shark with 300 Teeth Captured in Australia

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posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: rukia
That's why I think dinosaurs aren't really wiped out.

It's accepted that there was a Great Flood. These ocean-dwellers wouldn't have been wiped out. Ditto with strong fliers like we've heard tell of (like the lightning birds or those pterodactyl sightings around the world).

I love dinosaurs. But this is why (& also because of River Monsters lol) I'm never going into a body of water that isn't a swimming pool ever again.


Australia and Africa are the two places where gigantism in animals is still around. I believe the Congo river basin supposedly hides 3-4 different species of massive sauropods seen by Pygmy tribes.




posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:41 PM
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I'll send you a picture of a Nestle!





So does this mean we might finally see a GOOD picture of Nessie? LOL



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: Prezbo369
It does have a look that's out of place, however. At certain angles I can certainly see something dinosaur-like.

Those're my unprofessional eyes.

My grandpa who's now deceased says he saw somehing eel-like bigger than a boat when he was fishing some 50 years ago. He described it as brown/green. Strangely enough, this frilled shark is kinda brown-ish.
edit on 22-1-2015 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: jonnywhite

An Oarfish can be up to 36 ft. and looks "eel-like".



The color does not seem right though.



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: Eunuchorn
More volcanoes are going off than in recorded history, & with 95% of volcanoes underwater, Id say the ocean depths are being super heated & immensely churned.



Do you have a source for that or it is just wild, unsubstantiated speculation ( regarding more volcanoes going off).

Also, just to let you know that in Geology, 'recorded history' goes back a lot further than in Anthropology.

edit on 22-1-2015 by aorAki because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: rukia
That's why I think dinosaurs aren't really wiped out.

It's accepted that there was a Great Flood. These ocean-dwellers wouldn't have been wiped out. Ditto with strong fliers like we've heard tell of (like the lightning birds or those pterodactyl sightings around the world).



Balls!
It's not accepted that there was a 'Great Flood'.
Many marine reptiles were 'wiped out'. There are no longer Ichthyosaur, Mosasaur, Plesiosaur, for example. A simple understanding of their niche proves that. Same with Pterodactyl etc.



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister

originally posted by: rukia
That's why I think dinosaurs aren't really wiped out.


I'm amazed at least a couple of times a week when I remember that birds are dinosaurs. Dinosaurs adapted so well that they are now everywhere, even in the midst of human urban environments. Next time you see a hummingbird eating, or a peacock strutting in full plumage, think: Dinosaur! and glory in the thought. (my favorites are magpies, good looking smart little buggers)


Are birds really dinosaurs?

I'll take a Kea over a Magpie any day



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 03:02 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Here's more information on it, and why we might be seeing more deep sea creatures being caught..



A generally rare to uncommon deepwater species, with a few localities where it is taken more commonly as bycatch in several fisheries. Not an important target species, but a regular though small bycatch in many bottom trawl, midwater trawl, deep-set longline, and deep-set gillnet fisheries. As bycatch, this species is variously either used for meat, fishmeal, or discarded. Occasionally kept in aquaria (Japan). There is some concern that expansion of deepwater fisheries effort (geographically and in depth range) will increase the levels of bycatch.


www.iucnredlist.org...



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