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A Terrifying Prehistoric Frilled Shark with 300 Teeth Captured in Australia

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posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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An ancient Shark known as a Frilled Shark has been caught off the shores of Australia. Frilled Sharks have 300 teeth, lives 1,300 feet below sea level and has ancestors that date back 80 million years.



At about 6 feet in length, it’s not among the largest sharks in the seas. It looks more like an eel. But it’s got many more teeth than most sharks, 25 rows of them for a total of 300. By contrast, the great white shark has 50 teeth.


I've been reading a lot of headlines recently about deep sea creatures being spotted or caught in shallower waters. I wonder what's going on in the deep that's causing the deep sea life to come up....? Pollution, chemicals, magnetic variation? Are their internal gyroscopes shifting?? What does ATS think?

www.washingtonpost.com...




posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

Here ya go... some pics





edit on 21/1/15 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:55 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I'm convinced that it is due to the rising acidity levels in the oceans... These creatures are being forced to alter their own way of life due to the destruction we are causing to this planet.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: jhn7537
a reply to: lostbook

I'm convinced that it is due to the rising acidity levels in the oceans... These creatures are being forced to alter their own way of life due to the destruction we are causing to this planet.


Yes. I'd heard about the rising acidity levels of the oceans. That coupled with the potential releasing of methane hydrates spells rough times ahead. Maybe the message from the deep sea creatures is that the destruction is starting from the bottom-up.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 11:06 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

This is par for the course down under.

Australia has a very diverse ecosystem-it is the only continent on the planet that has monotremes (egg laying mammals) and Macropods (i.e Kangaroos) so this should not come as a surprise.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 11:07 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

Well...the more of these fish that are starting to migrate out of deep waters means only one thing....

You will start seeing more of them in sushi bars too!




posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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I think I have one of these living in my pond with the perch. I haven't seen it of course, due to the algae and overall dirtiness of the water, but sometimes I get this feeling like a shark with 300 teeth is watching me from below the surface. Need to get some scientists out here. The big question of course is whether animals in the ocean are being driven to shallower depths. If the answer is yes, then the next big question is whether we are causing it, or if some natural environmental changes are responsible. Maybe the magnetic poles are changing. We are due for a pole shift. I don't follow the scientific data so I don't know if there have been any abnormalities recorded. If so, we might have our answer. It does seem that animals living at deeper levels would be less affected by humans than animals living closer to the surface, but if pollution is the cause then perhaps it sinks down and contaminates various depths. That shark looks like the worms from the Tremors movies by the way.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

I think speculating as to the "why" behind these things is pointless. I will wonder, but not come up with answers to fit some sort of AGW or non-AGW agenda. Quite possibly, some of these creatures come up to the surface to die, and it happens more than we know because of how large the oceans are.

Just a thought...it could be natural.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: lostbook


I wonder what's going on in the deep that's causing the deep sea life to come up....? Pollution, chemicals, magnetic variation? Are their internal gyroscopes shifting??


None of the above...


"I know they occasionally see them at the surface, because a lot make vertical migrations at night time, as they follow prey up and down in the water column," he said, adding that its eel-like swimming motion makes it quite unique among sharks.



"There are usually three main spots it is found, in waters off New Zealand, near Japan and along the coast of the British Isles, down through Spain into northern Africa. However, there are some maps that show distributions that encompass the Victorian coast," he said.


better source



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 02:09 PM
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More volcanoes are going off than in recorded history, & with 95% of volcanoes underwater, Id say the ocean depths are being super heated & immensely churned.

This + Fukushima = Godzilla. Multiple Godzillas if we're lucky.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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Hm Eunuchorn you may be on to something, I wonder how many giant monsters live down there as it is, add a little(lot) radiation and viola!



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: Eunuchorn

300 Ft radiation breathing SAUROID means LUCK to you?



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: cavtrooper7

I'm a nihilist & fatalist so...HELL YA! Bring on the beasts!



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 06:40 PM
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It even has a dinosaur tyme appearance to it.



“The head on it was like something out of a horror movie. It was quite horrific looking. … It was quite scary actually.”

I saw this photo and "dinosaur" immediately registered in my brain.

I always thought that prehistoric species had survived on the ocean floors for hundreds of millions of years because the climate has been steady down there in contrast to the surface where climate change seems to be the norm.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 07:53 PM
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originally posted by: Asynchrony
It even has a dinosaur tyme appearance to it.



“The head on it was like something out of a horror movie. It was quite horrific looking. … It was quite scary actually.”

I saw this photo and "dinosaur" immediately registered in my brain.

I always thought that prehistoric species had survived on the ocean floors for hundreds of millions of years because the climate has been steady down there in contrast to the surface where climate change seems to be the norm.



So does this mean we might finally see a GOOD picture of Nessie? LOL




posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 12:53 AM
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That's why I think dinosaurs aren't really wiped out.

It's accepted that there was a Great Flood. These ocean-dwellers wouldn't have been wiped out. Ditto with strong fliers like we've heard tell of (like the lightning birds or those pterodactyl sightings around the world).

I love dinosaurs. But this is why (& also because of River Monsters lol) I'm never going into a body of water that isn't a swimming pool ever again.



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: Boomy327
Hm Eunuchorn you may be on to something, I wonder how many giant monsters live down there as it is, add a little(lot) radiation and viola!


Are you suggesting that radiation makes these fish musically talented?




posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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What an unshark looking shark. Thanks OP. Sorry it had to be caught and killed though, what a waste of life.

Yes, the oceans are in deep trouble, and if the world's governments, leaders, TPTB, and the U.N. don't act radically soon the stupidness of the human race will give rise to horrors that will make this shark look like a beautiful sunrise.



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: rukia
That's why I think dinosaurs aren't really wiped out.


I'm amazed at least a couple of times a week when I remember that birds are dinosaurs. Dinosaurs adapted so well that they are now everywhere, even in the midst of human urban environments. Next time you see a hummingbird eating, or a peacock strutting in full plumage, think: Dinosaur! and glory in the thought. (my favorites are magpies, good looking smart little buggers)



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 07:27 AM
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Frilled sharks have been washed up and caught in fishing nets many times in the past, the finding this one isn't necessarily an indication of anything.

It has very small teeth used to catch and hold onto small fish and squid, the description in the OP makes it sound like a ferocious predator comparable to the great white when in reality its a slow moving and sluggish ambush predator.

One is caught on video here, i'ts thought that it is not swimming very well due to it not being at its normal depth as it's natural habitat is around 2,000 ft below the surface .



Unfortunately they're not dinosaurs of the sea.




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