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Is marijuana really as dangerous as heroin and LSD? Finally, a welcome legal review

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posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:31 AM
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Is marijuana really as dangerous as heroin and '___'? Finally, a welcome legal review


A federal judge has done what Congress and the Obama administration have failed to do — open a discussion on whether marijuana should continue to be listed as a Schedule 1 drug, a classification that is supposed to be used only for the most dangerous, addictive drugs, such as heroin and '___'.

It shouldn't take a judge to point out that lumping marijuana in with heroin and deeming it to have no medicinal value at all is unreasonable and unnecessary.

As part of a criminal trial involving alleged marijuana growers in Northern California, U.S. District Judge Kimberly J. Mueller held a five-day hearing late last year to evaluate the current scientific research on marijuana use and to determine whether the Schedule 1 designation is unconstitutional, as the defendants contend. Final arguments are scheduled for next month.


It's about time the federal government gets around to addressing this. I, personally, look forward to the results of this decision. It is high time that marijuana be rescheduled. Reality and the federal government aren't syncing up. It's time for the Federal government to catch up.


Frankly, government policy on marijuana is a mess. Federal law says marijuana has no accepted medicinal value, yet 23 states have legalized it for medical use. It has been put on the list of drugs that carry the most severe penalties for drug crimes, but Congress and the Obama administration have also passed legislation that blocks funding for the enforcement of federal marijuana laws in states that allow medical marijuana. That law, passed in December, in effect ended the prohibition of medical marijuana in nearly half the states. Meanwhile, Colorado and Washington have been unofficially allowed by the federal government to legalize recreational pot.


You know, the fact that there are this many states with medical marijuana laws on the books kind of suggests that the DEA's scheduling is wrong.


Even as lawmakers relax enforcement, federal authorities, including the prosecutors in Mueller's courtroom, defend the Schedule 1 designation, saying there are not enough long-term studies of the medicinal value and health risks of marijuana use to justify reclassifying it. But the DEA has for decades made it nearly impossible for researchers to obtain the drug for study. The lack of research hasn't stopped many states from allowing the use of the drug for pain relief and other therapeutic purposes, but it has denied doctors and patients important information about the risks or benefits. The agency began increasing government production of marijuana for research only last year.


Always the same song and dance, "not enough long-term studies" yadda yadda yadda. Yet at the same time making it excessively difficult to even DO the studies. This is such a blatant trampling of our rights and as well as trampling on the will of the people. The fact of the matter is that over half the country has legalized some form of marijuana and just over 50% of the populace agrees with legalizing it outright. Why are they still fighting this? (don't answer that question, I already know the answer).


Legalization advocates hope Mueller will rule that federal marijuana policy is unconstitutional. Although her decision would apply only to the defendants in this case and could be appealed, a ruling against the existing policy could prompt other defendants to file similar motions. But the country's drug laws should not be decided in the courts. It's long past time for Washington to revisit the war on drugs, and officials can begin by reclassifying medical marijuana so it can be regulated more as a prescription drug.


While an unconstitutional ruling won't end the federal ban outright, it DOES open the door for further look into this. Heck, with enough appeals we can kick this up to the Supreme Court and THEY can rule it unconstitutional.

PS: I don't think '___' should be a schedule 1 drug either, but that is a battle for another day.
edit on 21-1-2015 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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I'm as liberal as they come, I understand MJ is not as dangerous as laws make us think and education systems wrongly makes us believe.

However, there are so many people around here who treat it as the Messiah. Let me tell you something (not specifically you OP), I'm in my mid 30s, my friends are the same age and older. After their experiences/habits with this stuff... I can honestly say about 90% of my friends/family who used to smoke habitually will never touch it again. And they say this with fear, fear of anxiety, paranoia, lethargy, not being able to stop thinking about things, never dreaming, becoming unclean and blaming it on being down to earth etc etc

I'm not against any substance - by any imagination, substances can and do expand the mind.

But all this conjecture about MJ being the world's saviour... It's far from the truth.

(Sorry to hijack your thread OP.)



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

MJ is no more dangerous than alcohol.

Any mood altering substance has the potential of being dangerous if abused.

But if you do things responsibly you'll be fine.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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a reply to: and14263

Gonna have to do a little hijacking methinks, just to make a point:


But all this conjecture about MJ being the world's saviour... It's far from the truth.


Not the world's savior persay. But a Hemp infused economy, not only relying on MJ, could certainly be the way of the future for North America. It ha the potential, to bring tons of manufacturing jobs to the US and Canada, as well as a lot of medical and science research.

There are many ways which you could say that Hemp, if utilized correctly and leveraged correctly, could solve a lot of our problems.

a reply to: Krazysh0t

Ok, back to the thread.

YES.

This is actually some of the best news we could have had, because it sets a precedent for Drug Schedules if this goes the way it should.

Now that leaves room for that SCOTUS ruling on the placement of certain drugs in the Controlled Substances Act.



~Tenth



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:52 AM
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Cannabis/hemp could be some form of saviour.
Cannabis recreationally takes pressure of the judicial system and prisons,
Legalizing it creates jobs, is taxed to create revenue for your roads, schools, among other things

Hemp can be made into thousands of things, most recently a hemp battery that is just as efficient as graphite, and is easier/cheaper to produce than graphite. It can be made into paper, building materials, clothing, fuel, plastics and some food as well. -if- hemp (the more saviour of society than cannabis) was industrialized. It would turn our economy upside down. The forestry business would cease to exist, as wood wouldn't be needed for building materials/paper things. Platics is another big on as well, can be wholly replaced by bio-plastics made of hemp. Oil would cease to be the #1.

But alas we live in an oil run world. I bet oil being in the crust of the earth has some form of use, by the earth. And the earth will be pissed when her parts stop working because we took away her lube.

Note: I think all drugs should be legal, produced, and taxed. As ludicrous as some people may deem that. There is no evidence that legal drugs make more addicts. The exact opposite actually.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:53 AM
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From experience, doing a drug (any drug) makes it much easier in ones mind to "do some other drug". Especially if its illegal (more fun).

When they say it "leads" to harder stuff, thats all that means.

Addiction and dependency on anything (cigarettes, food, alcohol) is a process of tolerance and acceptance. Once you accept a habit you become dependent on it. Repeated use lowers tolerance. One beer today is supplanted by two tomorrow to get the same effect. When beer isn't enough to satisfy the "dependency" anymore, then its on to harder alcohol. Same for drugs, food, cigarettes, whatever.

This post isn't for those few in control and practicing moderation in all things…



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:56 AM
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The answer plain and simple is no. Never was and never will be. Come on everyone knows that the classification of pot as a schedule one drug was an attempt to control a certain segment of society. This needs to not get buried folks. This needs to be remembered.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: grey580

Heck, by all accounts it is far LESS dangerous than alcohol.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:58 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

I think hemp and MJ are different. Hemp rope, oil, material etc could indeed be our saviour. MJ is the one that gets you whacked out (as my old man would say).



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 09:59 AM
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To be fair heroin in the form of morphine also has medical value but still causes physical addiction.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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But that's what it's purpose is. No body is using vodka to sterilize medical equipment. Few people are using beer too make puffy batter for fish.
And few if any are growing cannabis to keep themselves in rope. reply to: and14263



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: and14263

There's use and then there's over-use. Many people find it either relaxing or energizing, depending on the time of day.

Add in the many advantages of hemp.....textiles, oils, hempcrete.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: and14263
a reply to: tothetenthpower

I think hemp and MJ are different. Hemp rope, oil, material etc could indeed be our saviour. MJ is the one that gets you whacked out (as my old man would say).


True but they are both the same plant. Advocating for MJ legalization is also advocating Hemp legalization.

That's why it's an important thing to keep in mind. The argument for the removal of MJ as a Schedule A drug is not only a moral argument, or a common sense one, but a huge economic one as well.

~Tenth



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:09 AM
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No it's not all they mean. They said plain and simple that it was a gateway drug. Proof they lied??? I still only have an occasional drink and I've never tried hard drugs. So says 40 years of research.


a reply to: intrptr



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:11 AM
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If that post is out of terms please give me the opportunity to edit it before taking any actions.
T&C does need revision in consideration of recent changes in laws. But still I'll comply if I'm out of bounds with the above. I'm not condoning any actions what so ever.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

I've always said it's only a gate way to drug culture. People who generally use at a young age or in their teens are mixed up in the wrong crowed to begin with. As they get older they try different drugs.

Weed isn't the 'gateway' it's not addictive, it's simply something a lot of people use and just so happens people who use hard drugs also smoke.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:24 AM
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To be honest in the seventies it was the only crowd. Except for a small segment of society destined for M.I.T.

reply to: strongfp



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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To all that still think and believe that the U.S. Government works for "The People" Please just stop it.

What would your thoughts of, say, that the pharmaceutical industry in the 40's and 50's found that MJ was beneficial to the human immunization system and helped cure several disorders that their products, that they spent millions to produce, just to treats the symptoms, would have done to make it impossible for anyone to find out.

Think long and hard about who really controls the US. Now keep asking yourself, why does the US keep making the decisions it does that most US people disagree with. Because it is a government bought for by the Elites that can afford it. Nothing else matters.

Sirric



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: sirric

Marijuana was made illegal because of crony capitalism. The pharmaceutical industry is just the newest bad guy who wants to keep it illegal.

Why is Marijuana Illegal?


You’ll also see that the history of marijuana’s criminalization is filled with:

Racism
Fear
Protection of Corporate Profits
Yellow Journalism
Ignorant, Incompetent, and/or Corrupt Legislators
Personal Career Advancement and Greed



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 10:37 AM
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I've got a question here as it pertains to state vs fed law. Say you have 2 states with legal weed that share a border. It's legal in both BUT you cross from one into the other. Would that violate fed laws?



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