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2015 Fireballs

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posted on Apr, 4 2015 @ 07:14 AM
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It seems that some of the earlier videos have disappeared. If you are interested in seeing those ones, just go to youtube and do a search using the key words, such as "Amur region 2015 fireball" etc.

Here are some nice new ones, the one from Nova Scotia even has a nice little green explosion!







Does anyone know what mineral is causing these fireballs to burn so greenish, and can identification of this particular mineral or minerals aid us in understanding the origin of these fireballs?






edit on 4-4-2015 by PlanetXisHERE because: grammar, syntax and context




posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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Nice Hungarian/Slovak fireball:






posted on Apr, 18 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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Wow, this one from Puerto Rico two weeks ago was quite large and greenish, again:




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:50 AM
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A quite bright Chilean fireball from May 12:




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 07:51 AM
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Thanks for the vids, PlanetX



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: Rezlooper
Thanks for the vids, PlanetX


My pleasure, Rezlooper.

What do you think about the often seen greenish tint? Isn't that something new? Would it tie into any of your methane theories?



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 07:03 PM
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originally posted by: PlanetXisHERE

originally posted by: Rezlooper
Thanks for the vids, PlanetX


My pleasure, Rezlooper.

What do you think about the often seen greenish tint? Isn't that something new? Would it tie into any of your methane theories?


Indeed. I believe the green is from the higher concentration of methane in the upper atmosphere. Methane is causing the meteors to burn green. In the past 7 years methane has been increasing and then in the past few years there has been this explosion of green fireballs. It makes sense.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 07:52 PM
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originally posted by: Rezlooper

originally posted by: PlanetXisHERE

originally posted by: Rezlooper
Thanks for the vids, PlanetX


My pleasure, Rezlooper.

What do you think about the often seen greenish tint? Isn't that something new? Would it tie into any of your methane theories?


Indeed. I believe the green is from the higher concentration of methane in the upper atmosphere. Methane is causing the meteors to burn green. In the past 7 years methane has been increasing and then in the past few years there has been this explosion of green fireballs. It makes sense.


The majority of meteors, especially stony irons, are high in nickel, which burns green when vaporized by the friction of moving through the atmosphere. I do not know if a higher concentration of methane would make it any greener... but who knows. What is true is, in the absence of moving through methane, they would still burn green.

edit on 29-5-2015 by charlyv because: spelling , where caught

edit on 29-5-2015 by charlyv because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 11:24 PM
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originally posted by: charlyv

originally posted by: Rezlooper

originally posted by: PlanetXisHERE

originally posted by: Rezlooper
Thanks for the vids, PlanetX


My pleasure, Rezlooper.

What do you think about the often seen greenish tint? Isn't that something new? Would it tie into any of your methane theories?


Indeed. I believe the green is from the higher concentration of methane in the upper atmosphere. Methane is causing the meteors to burn green. In the past 7 years methane has been increasing and then in the past few years there has been this explosion of green fireballs. It makes sense.


The majority of meteors, especially stony irons, are high in nickel, which burns green when vaporized by the friction of moving through the atmosphere. I do not know if a higher concentration of methane would make it any greener... but who knows. What is true is, in the absence of moving through methane, they would still burn green.


Yea, I've seen that nickel burns green but how often prior to the past few years has there been these green fireballs? Just saying, seems like there all of a sudden pretty common.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 10:10 PM
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a reply to: Rezlooper






Yea, I've seen that nickel burns green but how often prior to the past few years has there been these green fireballs? Just saying, seems like there all of a sudden pretty common.


We were both involved in a discussion like this in a past post I cannot conjure up. The methane scenario does have it's points, as we know that increased levels of methane are indeed leaching into the upper atmosphere. The issue is how much? We are not being told that, or there is insufficient data collection.

What did come up in that discussion is something I think could be the reason, and that is due to Sun wobbling around it's gravitational average center, we in turn may be pulled into fringe areas around our orbit that contain new streams of meteors. Perhaps there are more iron bearing meteors in these fringes, and that is why the increased sightings of green fireballs.

It is a cool subject, and I respect any opinion that is based on reality. Who knows, there could be a combined effect, and most likely science could tell more with sufficient spectral analysis of the events. That requires a real time effort, as regular video cannot provide the detail needed for that analysis.



posted on Aug, 3 2015 @ 08:14 AM
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Some recent, cool meteors:

July 20 2015 Buenos Aries



This one is probably not a meteor, though labelled as such, but a UFO:




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