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Australia's opinion . Well anyone really .

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posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 01:58 AM
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www.9news.com.au...

Well it looks like Indonesia is sticking to its guns ( pun not intended ) with the execution of 6 people this morning my time . What i am interested in is the opinions of fellow Australians with the scheduled execution of Myuran Sukumaran and Andrew Chan in the coming year .

www.9news.com.au...

These 2 men were amongst 9 convicted for attempting to smuggle 8.2 kilos of heroin into Australia . Indonesia's laws state very clearly what the penalties for drug smuggling are . Put simply death by firing squad .


Indonesia, which has extremely strict drug laws, carries out executions by firing squad.


Also .


Mr Prasetyo said the executions were in line with Mr Joko's determination to crack down on drug crime, which the government claims kill up to 40 Indonesians daily.


Now at the core i am against executions . They are just state sanctioned murders in my opinion . However having said that , they committed a crime in a country where they knew the consequences . They rolled the dice so to speak and it came up death . Also 8.2 kilos of heroin was not brought into my country and for that i am great-full . The only apprehension i have is this .


Father Charlie Burrows, a Catholic priest who has lived in Indonesia for 35 years, said it took seven minutes for the men to die after they were shot. As the men moaned and gurgled, the firing squad's leader was apparently unprepared to take the action stipulated in detailed regulations if life lingers - firing a bullet into the head of the condemned from point-blank range.


What says ATS .




posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:08 AM
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Meh. They shouldn't have smuggled drugs into a country with the death penalty.

And honestly. It's heroin they were smuggling in. It could have killed many people through overdoses... I have no doubt.

This sends a clear warning to other drug smugglers...

I have no doubt that these executions being put in the public spotlight would prevent some smugglers. Or at least warn of the dangers associated with that life.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:11 AM
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a reply to: DaRAGE

They were smuggling the heroin out of Indonesia .
Apparently there is some hope as this came up as i was posting .

www.9news.com.au...
edit on 18-1-2015 by hutch622 because: to add

edit on 18-1-2015 by hutch622 because: spelling



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:11 AM
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The Electric chair, Bullets,Poison, Hanging, all have failed to bring swift death at times....to different convicted criminals.....
The death penalty is harsh, and the risks are ultimate...8 kilos is hardly an amatures first time crime....
That much heroin is worth millions, and many lives could have been ruined by it or lost to overdoses, murders for drugs and even robberies etc...Though i am in favour of decriminalization of drugs....in the current situation a successful smuggle of that quantity would have meant untold misery,prostitution, slavery for many Australians....obviously the convicted cared little for all of that....

edit on 18-1-2015 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:17 AM
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They broke Indonesian law, that means Indonesia gets to pass sentence. They mean business with drug smuggling as these people found out.

Hopefully it's a wake up call to anyone else considering doing stupid crap in foreign countries.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

Hang em high and watch em fly. Heroin is for filthy grubs.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:20 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

I do not agree with capital punishment for drug offences. I am not sure what to think but I wonder if I would be calling for capital punishment if my daughter was addicted to heroin? You wonder what kind of people smuggle heroin don't you. They would have to be risk takers who like the adrenalin rush of putting their life on the line. Or addicts themselves.
I have an ex-friend who used to be a heroin and coke addict and used to be a drug mule, dropping off illegal drugs to various dealers. I wonder how much misery resulted from his activities and whether anyone overdosed from his drugs. It is one thing to be an addict but it is another thing to profit from this horrible business. It is a bad scene all round.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:23 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

I am against the death penalty - it's not up to us to take another persons life and call it justice. But that's a different argument for another day.

Reading opinion pieces, social feeds etc, most people are doing the - Scumbags deserve it, how many of them would they have killed with their drugs etc they are morons etc yada yada yada.

My question to them is - If your child became involved in something like that - knowing or otherwise, the consequences - would you still be happy to see them killed for it?

Scott Rush (one of the Bali 9) 's father Lee, tipped off the Australian Federal Police (AFP) in the first place, he was worried about his son and wanted to stop him from leaving Australia. Scott goes to Bali - AFP then tips off the Indonesian Police and a week later they are arrested.

The heroin was actually being attempted to be taken to Australia, it was already in Indonesia, possibly smuggled in via a female Thai Courier, if that is the case then the Indonesian authorities done goofed by not intercepting it in the first place. The AFP could easily have waited until they arrived in Australia and arrest them then - charging them under our own laws. But nope.

I remember reading about a lady I think it was in the US, who mentors or is some kind of chaplain, people on Death Row or Life, and she said that every person has the potential to redeem themselves, if given the chance. Though horrid crimes like murder, rape, torture etc make it hard to see how anyone could redeem themselves. Remember the Yin and Yang? Positive with a bit of negative and Negative with a bit of positive? There are those in prison who truly have (not all btw) found something useful to give to society. For instance Myuran and Andrew of the Bali 9 have helped educate and set up programs for other inmates to reduce recidivism. There was a guy in the US who was executed and his final meal request was denied. The request was simply a vegetarian/vegan pizza donated to the homeless. And that was denied. But when people heard it was, they went out, in this convicted man's honour and ordered and delivered heaps of pizza to shelters and on the streets. One man, his last wish was to do something good (however big it was) and it ended up coming true... when he died sadly



PS: One thing that really gets my goat, is how fellow Aussies are happy that the death penalty stands for the 2 of Bali 9 - Do the crime, do the time' - in context they forget that Abu Bakar Bashir (Horrible man who leads Jemaah Islamiah) got a light sentence for his role in the Bali Bombings, and people smugglers and sex traffickers of children get 5 years or whatever in prison. Yep - Those drug smugglers deserve to die darn it. *rolls eyes*

Edit to add: Also springs to mind the sad tale of Van Nguyen who was convicted and executed for smuggling heroin in Singapore. He did it for his brother - who was tens of thousands of dollars in debt. I lit a candle for the boy.

anyways links for pizza story if anyone was interested btw Final request - Pizza for homeless
edit on 18-1-2015 by auroraaus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: hutch622

As always with executing people the issue is the degree of certainly. Even if a jury unamously convicts a person one can never be absolutely certain about the guilt.

It comes down to the value of human life, is it better to let 10 gulity go than execute 1 innocent person or, is it better to hang 1 innocent person to amke we we hang 10 guility ones. The readers answer to this question reflects the value they put on human life. Bear in mind the more we value the lives of others the more value to place on our own and the reverse is also the case.

If these laws had have been enforced with Schapple Corby she too would have been executed. Why would her family or lawyers make 10 enquires any who which would have proven he guilt if she was guility.
Why does Qantas to this day refuse to hand over the weight of Schepples baggage at checkin ?

Why to this day does the federal goverment not ask, request or insist they hand over that data? after all if she was quilty it would establsih he guilt in the minds of many more people. is that not what the australian government want or do they just dont care.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:32 AM
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a reply to: grumpy64


I do not agree with capital punishment for drug offences.


As i stated above i am against the death penalty period . But i must say that stance is beginning to weaken . Terrorism is something that comes to mind . I remember when Barlow and Chambers were executed in 86 . At the time i thought it outrageous that a country could execute fellow Australians . Now not so much .

LINK
www.theguardian.com...



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:48 AM
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Its black and white in the eyes of Indonesian Law. Australia hasn't pulled their fingers out enough to get their circumstances to change. I don't like to see people executed for a crime like this, but i also dont like seeing the terrible social impacts this crime would have had in Australia. I hope their clemency is accepted and they stay in jail a longtime, but I think people should get over it. This happens to so many of the Balinese people, why not care for them and only the Australian Nationals. Its all in the media- this is just a story for them to play, they didn't care about making a real impact in the 9's lives.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:52 AM
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Who cares whether it was into or out of Indonesia. They got caught in a country smuggling drugs that holds the death penalty. Im more concerned with them wanting to smuggle 8kgs of heroin into australia than some of them being australian and being executed for smuggling.

heroin is such a bad drug on the bad drugs scale



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:55 AM
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originally posted by: auroraaus
Scott Rush (one of the Bali 9) 's father Lee, tipped off the Australian Federal Police (AFP) in the first place, he was worried about his son and wanted to stop him from leaving Australia. Scott goes to Bali - AFP then tips off the Indonesian Police and a week later they are arrested.


So why didn't his father tell his son the police knew he was going to smuggle drugs?


The AFP could easily have waited until they arrived in Australia and arrest them then - charging them under our own laws. But nope.


Why would they do that? Our weak judges would have just given the scum a slap on the wrist.


For instance Myuran and Andrew of the Bali 9 have helped educate and set up programs for other inmates to reduce recidivism.


Their lawyer just told them to do that to try and get them a lighter sentence.


Also springs to mind the sad tale of Van Nguyen who was convicted and executed for smuggling heroin in Singapore. He did it for his brother - who was tens of thousands of dollars in debt.


Or he could have just gotten a job and worked like a normal person....



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: DaRAGE

As opposed to Ice??

You know what is actually possibly the worst drug for society?? Alcohol.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: Puzzuzu


Its black and white in the eyes of Indonesian Law. Australia hasn't pulled their fingers out enough to get their circumstances to change. I don't like to see people executed for a crime like this, but i also dont like seeing the terrible social impacts this crime would have had in Australia. I hope their clemency is accepted and they stay in jail a longtime, but I think people should get over it. This happens to so many of the Balinese people, why not care for them and only the Australian Nationals. Its all in the media- this is just a story for them to play, they didn't care about making a real impact in the 9's lives.


I don't disagree with anything you have said , well up until the last 3 or 4 lines where i am not sure what you were trying to say .


This happens to so many of the Balinese people, why not care for them and only the Australian Nationals. Its all in the media- this is just a story for them to play, they didn't care about making a real impact in the 9's lives.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 02:59 AM
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a reply to: hellobruce

1. He probably did.
2. You have highlighted a problem with our judicial system.
3. Do you have absolute proof that their lawyer told them to do that?
5. He actually did have a job, IIRC he also used to have a computer repair business.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 03:00 AM
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originally posted by: learnatic
If these laws had have been enforced with Schapple Corby she too would have been executed.


Pity they were not, another drug smuggler that got caught.


Why would her family or lawyers make 10 enquires any who which would have proven he guilt if she was guility.


She was guilty...


Why does Qantas to this day refuse to hand over the weight of Schepples baggage at checkin ?


They probably did not have it separate.


Why to this day does the federal goverment not ask, request or insist they hand over that data?


It is probably not available


after all if she was quilty


She is guilty, her whole family was involved with drugs.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 03:02 AM
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a reply to: auroraaus

Totally agree with you.
How easy it is for people to act like the god of the old testament, since when did our tower of babel reach such highs as to give us the right to judge and take another's life?



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 03:02 AM
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One may not believe in the death penalty and that is fine. Personally I don't like it considering all the cases in the US where so many have been found to have been wrongfully fond guilty. As such I cam be more than free to work towards getting rid of it in my own countries. Yet at the same time That does not give me the right to tell another country how to deal with their own problems. That is for the people of that country to decide. Many countries have the death penalty for drug smuggling, (sometimes even just selling or distributing drugs carries that penalty) including where I currently am. And sorry to say it but any idiot who makes the choice to smuggle or sell drugs in such a country deserves to pay the penalty as stated in their laws. If it is death, or just a $20 fine, they chose to do it anyway and have done it to themselves.

if this was a case of someone slipping something into their luggage (like say at the airport where they can open your luggage at will, even requiring locks they can open). If that was the claim of what happened it would be different. Or if they were forced to do it, depending on circumstances it might be diferant. But no it seems that a family member of one rightfully turned them in. They chose to commit the crime therefore the result of being caught is all on them. Simple lesson to learn, if you don't want to face the penalty, then don't commit the crime.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 03:05 AM
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a reply to: hellobruce

So i am guessing you are one for execution . Thats ok as this post was about Australia's feelings on this . There is not meant to be a right or wrong just opinions .



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