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More Information About Christopher Cornell's Past...

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posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 07:19 PM
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originally posted by: lovebeck
a reply to: deadeyedick

I doubt we will ever know. I was surprised at his charges, actually. But, then again, I don't know the ins and outs of the law and what all the Patriot Act says about talking about, planning or even thinking about carrying out acts of terrorism.



These are just some highlights, but I remember awhile back, they used the Patriot Act to go into your Library system to see what kind of books you were checking out and other stupid things. I'll see if I can find a link.

Patriot Act




posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: lovebeck
a reply to: deadeyedick

I doubt we will ever know. I was surprised at his charges, actually. But, then again, I don't know the ins and outs of the law and what all the Patriot Act says about talking about, planning or even thinking about carrying out acts of terrorism.



This link goes more into it.

The intricacies of the Patriot Act



In Section 215, "any tangible things" may include almost any kind of property--such as books, documents, and computers. The FBI may also monitor or seize personal records held by public libraries, bookstores, medical offices, Internet providers, churches, political groups, universities, and other businesses and institutions.

The Patriot Act prohibits third parties served with Section 215 orders such as Internet providers and public librarians to inform anyone that the FBI has conducted a search of their records.

Another area of concern is Section 213 of the Patriot Act. It authorizes so-called "sneak- and-peek" searches for all federal criminal investigations. When applying for a search warrant, officers may show that there is "reasonable cause to believe that providing immediate notification . . . may have an adverse result." If the judge approves, then the FBI can delay notifying a citizen about the search for a "reasonable period." Thus, the FBI may search a citizen's home or business in secret. The FBI says these searches may be necessary to prevent the destruction of evidence or to keep from jeopardizing an ongoing secret investigation.



 
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