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12 Earthquakes hit Connecticut in a week

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posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:44 AM
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heard this on the news.. 12 in one week! anyone have any ideas what is going on? any fracking nearby?
edit on 1/15/2015 by tothetenthpower because: -Mod Edit- All Caps, don't use them





posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: HODOSKE
heard this on the news.. 12 in one week! anyone have any ideas what is going on? any fracking nearby?


I posted about the first few on the Quake Watch 2015 thread but didn't get any responses as to if it was strange or not. I just haven't heard about many quakes in that area and thought it was strange myself.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

Do you have a link for any of this?



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: HODOSKE

Do you have a link for any of this?




1) Jan. 8: 9:28 a.m. -- 2.0 magnitude quake, centered in Plainfield
2) Jan. 9: 10:26 a.m. -- 0.4 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
3) Jan. 12: 6:33 a.m. -- 1.6 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
4) Jan. 12: 6:34 a.m. -- 1.5 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
5) Jan. 12: 6:36 a.m. -- 3.3 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
6) Jan. 12: 6:50 a.m. -- 2.1 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
7) Jan. 12: 12:03 p.m. -- 1.7 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
8) Jan. 12: 1:04 p.m. -- 1.6 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
9) Jan. 13: 7:27 a.m. -- 2.3 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
10) Jan. 14: 6:33 a.m. -- 1.8 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield.
11) Jan. 14: 8:10 a.m. -- 1.5 magnitude earthquake in Plainfield
12) Jan. 15: 4:39 a.m. -- 2.2 magnitude earthquake, near Moosup


Source



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

Depends on the earthquake.

There is normally around 90,000 earthquakes of magnitude 2.5 (or less) per year. These quakes are so small that they are usually not felt, but they get recorded on a seismograph.

www.geo.mtu.edu...

I don't think there is anything to worry about - probably just "journalists" stretching nature's natural rumblings for the sake of doom porn.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:52 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Thanks for doing the OP's job for him.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:53 AM
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Strange, do they usually have quakes there?

My daughter is working in Connecticut now, she was in Southern Cali for a week in the beginning of January. Maybe some stowed away in her suitcase when she came back.

edit on 15-1-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:53 AM
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I was born and raised in Connecticut. I called my mother this morning and she said it's all over the news there. They are too small for most people to feel.

This could be the 'Moodus Noises' acting up.

MOODUS NOISES

The Moodus noises are rather famous in Connecticut. They've been there long before settlers arrived. The area was called 'place of bad noises' by the Native American Indians living there. Nowadays they are attributed to being microquakes. So that part of the country has a history of micro-earthquakes and little shakes happening in bursts.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

There are quakes almost everywhere. Some of them important, but most of them you can't even feel.

We must remember that most earthquakes are below the 2.5 line on the Richter scale and that they are perfectly natural (not to mention they occur quite often, that is, around 90,000 each years) - as long as tectonic plates move, there will be some rumbling.

Sorry to spoil the doom porn.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Vasa Croe

Thanks for doing the OP's job for him.


No problem....always here to help out.

Thanks for being ATS police.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:58 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

None of these earthquakes are classified as "dangerous". They are all below 2.5 on the Richter scale. Nothing to panic about.

Geez, science is your friend, people.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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originally posted by: swanne
a reply to: Vasa Croe

None of these earthquakes are classified as "dangerous". They are all below 2.5 on the Richter scale.


Yeah..not necessarily dangerous, just more out of the norm. I can't find anything that says this has ever happened there before, so I believe it is catching a lot of people there by surprise. Though small quakes, in this area with a lot of bedrock under it and shallow, they will feel them a lot more than a similar quake in CA where the soil makeup is much different. Kind of like when we get a quake in GA that registers small....it is felt a lot more because a lot of GA is on granite and a lot more solid than other areas that have frequent quakes.

And one was a 3.3.
edit on 1/15/15 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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If the area does not experience quakes because it is stable, there may be a cause for it. If we started having quakes up where I live, it would be important as we are very stable up in this area. Most of those 900,000 quakes are in certain geological areas. This should be taken into consideration. That is why I asked if there were usually quakes in the area.
edit on 15-1-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 11:08 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
If the area does not experience quakes because it is stable, there may be a cause for it.

Actually, the area in question is not immune to earthquakes.




The map with green spots was prepared by the Weston Observatory in Massachusetts, which operates a network of seismographs in New England. (...) Notice that most of the green circles in Connecticut cluster between Moodus and New Haven, but the large zone around and north of the greater New York City area includes a little bit of westernmost Connecticut. Other likely areas for earthquakes are in southeastern Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire, and Maine is surprisingly active as well.


source: www.wesleyan.edu...

So long answer short: No, it's not unusual for small earthquakes to occur there.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: swanne

That answers my original question then.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 11:10 AM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe
And one was a 3.3.


Oh my god!

I hope card castles in this area were not affected too much.




posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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I am from this area...and while I understand we do get quakes from time to time this is VERY UNUSUAL. They have been happening almost every morning since last Thursday. Almost ALWAYS between 6:30am and 7:30am. I believe today it was around 4:30am. Biggest one was a 3.3. Most people hear an "Explosion" then some shaking. It does have some people on edge a bit...as I said this is NOT NORMAL at all for this area. There is no fracking that anyone is aware of in this area. No blasting or anything. But its very odd its almost always in the morning during those time....its not ALWAYS...but pretty close to it.



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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I found more info on New England area quakes...
Boston's Earthquake Problem

A study by Boston College seismologist John Ebel, published earlier this year, zeroes in on the epicenter of the 1755 Cape Ann earthquake. Ebel, who has spent the last 25 years studying local quakes, also proposes a new idea: that all New England earthquakes -- including the 1755 one and a 1638 magnitude 7 quake probably centered in New Hampshire -- might be the aftershocks of an even larger historical quake. He says another large one may be looming.


Our earthquake threat is made more pressing by what distinguishes Boston among American cities: its elegant brick-and-mortar architecture, which in many cases sits on loose, unstable soil. Experts also warn that the city's aging infrastructure and utilities -- sewer mains, gas lines, bridges, and overpasses -- are rife with vulnerabilities. The length of time since the last significant quake seems to have dulled -- and, in some cases, erased -- our perception of the threat. Yet earthquakes do happen here. Why, then, isn't Boston ready for the next one?


Ebel has added a new wrinkle - that New England's quakes might be aftershocks of a larger historical event. "It's a very new idea," he says. "But the largest quakes that are possible in New England may still be on the horizon."

edit on 1/15/2015 by whatnext21 because: (no reason given)

edit on 1/15/2015 by whatnext21 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: HODOSKE

It's the end of the world as we know it, and I feel fine!!!!



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