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ISIS Have Made Their Move Into Afghanistan Says Army General

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posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: zedy63
so why are isis fighting the taliban thought they were on the same side do isis actualy know why there fighting then


ISIS fights all militant groups who do not agree to come under their wing...as they are actively doing in Syria and Iraq.

It is similar, I suppose, in concept to their insisting that a person convert to their version of Islam...or be executed. Hundreds, if not thousands, of Shiite Muslims have been murdered by ISIS just because they are not Sunni Muslims.

The only people on "their side", are people who will agree to be subjugated to them - which also includes the necessity of having to become a psycho killer, or a willing suicide bomber.




posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: TruthxIsxInxThexMist
a reply to: mobiusmale

The Taliban have already joined forces with ISIS according to this:

news.vice.com...



In a development that further complicates the fragmented allegiances and deteriorating security situation in Afghanistan, several defectors from the Taliban have pledged allegiance to the Islamic State. These disgruntled ex-Taliban members have reportedly stepped up their recruiting efforts in recent weeks, and even launched military operations in Afghanistan's south. A group of self-proclaimed Islamic State fighters in Helmand province have reportedly been drafting new members, flying the militant group's trademark black flag, and battling their former comrades in the Taliban.


www.youtube.com...

Video above.


That article says that ex-Taliban fighters have pledged their allegiance to IS. That isn't quite the same as the Taliban actually joining forces with them.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: Dabrazzo

LOL

How is it one hops over Iran exactly?


Quite simple really...they don't attempt to march through Iran - as they are wholly incapable of taking them on at the moment.

They reach out to disgruntled Taliban commanders, who do the recruiting of Afghanistan fighters and other spade work...with the ultimate goals of replacing/absorbing the Taliban - before overrunning the weak central Afghanistan Government's forces.

Iran is then faced with an ISIS enemy on both sides of it...East and West.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:05 AM
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originally posted by: Dabrazzo

How is it one hops over Iran exactly?



Nobody is hopping anywhere.
What happens is this: Some muslim fundamentalist brigade find that their goals are similar to those of the IS and then go and pledge allegiance to their leader. If sucessful, they will become an official part of the IS and if more successful, even a province of the IS (as it happened with Libya with the province Barqa, which became the first official extraterritorial province). IS will then likely send them some commander as the province governor.
There are other groups around who have not yet granted official recognition and/or are too small to become a province, eg. the group in Egypt, who claims the Sinai pensinsula theirs.

Most probably, more groups will eventually join the IS (because unity makes strong and they realize that, for now, it makes more sense to fight united than to fight against each other), and I suspect that the Afghanistan group is one of them, others will follow, eg. in Nigeria, Somalia, Sudan, Malysia, Pakistan and so on.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: carport
a reply to: mobiusmale

Personaly id wait until some really authentic youtube video surfaces titled "ISIS Gone Wild 2, Afghan Edition 2015" before I really commit to what appears to be nothing more than wild specualtion from a government desperatly trying to legitimise itslef to the rest of the world.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

Thank you for educating me



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:29 AM
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What nobody is thinking about is the end result.
These types of organizations require a continous supply of cash.
Once they take over an area they then have to run things.
Which is much harder than killing the infidels that ran it before.

Once the plundered loot runs out. Once the infidel women supply runs out. Once those fighters have to get a job things start to fall apart.
Today you are a fighter. You shoot a few people in a new village and execute the men that try to run off. Then force the women to cook you a big meal before you take them anyway you want.
Tomorrow you are expected to get a job and work 12 hour days and work a deal to the family ( of faith) for their daughter.

Nope it ain't gonna work.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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Ah yes, Afghanistan once again the stage of men waving around big sticks to gain dominance.
If my history is correct it's the burial grounds of all military campaigns, no one has ever successfully conquered it. Maybe the Khans of Mongolia, that's about it.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 11:59 AM
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I read this a few days ago on the bbc. Apparently one of the Afghan Taliban leaders has defected and is actively recruiting in afghanistan much to the annoyance of thenindogineous local tribesmen sick of war, and to the afghan army. And probably to all local people of that area.

What's interesting is the officials say these people who want to fight in afghanistan are "all the same". They just want war. They just want to fight. One day theye wearing white clothes and waving white flags under taliban leadership, and the next they're wearing black flying black flags under some other leadership.

At the end of the day they don't belong there. Its not their land its not their business. They should get out and leave the afghani people alone.
To the world corrupt elite, its a hill fort in a chessboard between east and west asia. To the indigineous Afghani tribal people its their ancient homeland.

Mullah Abdul Rauf, a former Taliban commander has joined ISIS and is now recruiting for the group.

Mullah Abdul Rauf is a former Talibancommander from Helmand province, who recently declared his allegiance to ISIS and is now reportedly running a recruitment cell for the radical group in Afghanistan.

In a 2010 article inLong War Journal on Afghan Taliban's top leaders, Bill Roggio identified "Mullah Abdul Raouf (or Rauf)" as a former Taliban governor of Paktia province and a militarycommander in the northeast.

It is said that initially Mullah Abdul Rauf was also part of the Taliban's inner circleknown as the Quetta Shura.

Quetta Shura members are veterans of the Taliban regime that ruled Afghanistan in the late 1990s. A majority are mullahs, or Islamic clerics, who adhere to Deobandism – a puritanical sect of Sunni Islam in South Asia. Mullah Rauf was apparently kicked out of the Quetta Shura in 2011 over ideological differences with the group.

It is reported that, Rauf, who is now seen as an ISIS leader in Afganisatan, spent six years in Guantanamo Bay after being captured by US forces in 2001.

A local tribesman from a village councilin Sangin district told the BBC that the new ISIS cell in Afghanistan under Mullah Rauf has been raking up conflict with the Talibanbesides replacing white Taliban flagswith the black flags of ISIS.

In recent conflicts between ISIS and Taliban at least 20 people from both sides were reportedly killed and injured.

The rise of ISIS in Afghanistan under Mullah Abdul Rauf also has been confirmed by thehead of the Afghan army unit responsible for the area. 



Recently several Taliban leader were seen swearing their allegiance to ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi in a video.Twitter

"A number of tribal leaders, jihadi commanders and some ulema (religious council members) and other people told me that Mullah Rauf had contacted them and invited them to join him," General Mahmood Khan, the deputy commander of the army's 215 Corps toldCBS.

He said they were trying to win support for the ISIS cause, and were "preparing to fight".

In other development, a former spokesman for the Pakistani Taliban recently appeared in a video online, saying that there were several ISIS commanders operating in the region, and that the Pakistani Taliban were now allied to the movement.

There is no independent verification of this claim, but the video had images of several commanders across Afghanistan who were also said to be now backing the Islamic State.

www.ibtimes.co.in...
edit on 14 1 15 by funkadeliaaaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: zedy63
so why are isis fighting the taliban thought they were on the same side do isis actualy know why there fighting then
because the Taliban see themselves as a legitimate political party and the rightful governors of Afghanistan. This isn't a fight about differences in ideology it's about control and power.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 12:16 PM
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originally posted by: strongfp
Ah yes, Afghanistan once again the stage of men waving around big sticks to gain dominance.
If my history is correct it's the burial grounds of all military campaigns, no one has ever successfully conquered it. Maybe the Khans of Mongolia, that's about it.


Which, apparently, ISIS is well aware of...as they are using Afghans as foot soldiers and local leaders.

The Russians were not able to do what the Taliban later did. America had the power to displace the Taliban, but not the patience or the stomach for the 1-2 generation time span it would take to create a more docile and functional society.

ISIS, like the Taliban, will have no problem with the bloody business of cowing the population by the use of brutal...on-going...force. Their brutality knows no bounds.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol

originally posted by: chrismarco
a reply to: mobiusmale

I don't understand...didn't we fix everything...we gave them infrastructure, democracy and a new government..how in the world could all of this backfire?


And we cut off the Head of the Snake (Bin Laden).... wasn't that supposed to make everything all rainbows again.

The problem is we're not dealing with a snake. It's more like a worm. Cut it half and now you have two.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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In October 1963, when Harold Macmillan was handing over the premiership to Alec Douglas-Home, he is supposed to have called the younger man to his office and passed on some reassuring advice. “My dear boy,” he said, “as long as you don’t invade Afghanistan you’ll be absolutely fine.”

It could be their undoing too



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 01:19 PM
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a reply to: mobiusmale

I read an Word file some time ago ( I think in 2012). Basically what it said was that a Western backed extremists group would appear in Iraq, take down Assad and then move into Pakistan via Iran, steal some nuclear material and detonate the bomb somewhere in North America. This would then act as a catalyst to an another Middle East war, involving Iran and Pakistan.
At the time it didn't make sense but looking at what's happening now, It reminded me of the article.
I'll try to find it and post a link here.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 02:06 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie



just like iraq, neither country are ready to defend or govern themselves.



And neither of them wanted the states there so what are you gonna do?

As it is being said these guys are just going after soft targets.

I'll ask the question, if they are such a threat to that area, why doesn't saudi or our good ole buddies israel do something about them?



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Sremmos80

yep that's right the murderous women killing, drug dealing taliban or the tyrannical lunatic despot saddam hussein didn't want us to come in and kick them out. but we did anyway.

seeing how after we did that and the shape both countries were in, government wise and defense wise, we should have done a better job at helping them.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

Cool, I was talking about the 10+ years later.
When the people were tired of us being there.

I wonder how many countries see us as murderous women killing drug dealing gov or see us as having a lunatic leader...

Guess they have every right to just come in and take over and put who they want.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie



seeing how after we did that and the shape both countries were in, government wise and defense wise, we should have done a better job at helping them.

Haven't we learned to leave those two bit dictators alone?
At least they kept a lid on groups like IS and the TB.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 03:38 PM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol

originally posted by: chrismarco
a reply to: mobiusmale

I don't understand...didn't we fix everything...we gave them infrastructure, democracy and a new government..how in the world could all of this backfire?


And we cut off the Head of the Snake (Bin Laden).... wasn't that supposed to make everything all rainbows again.


I'm reminded of the mythical Hydra. Cut off one head, two grow back.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: Sremmos80

yep that's right the murderous women killing, drug dealing taliban or the tyrannical lunatic despot saddam hussein didn't want us to come in and kick them out. but we did anyway.

seeing how after we did that and the shape both countries were in, government wise and defense wise, we should have done a better job at helping them.

we never kicked the Taliban out of anywhere make no mistake about that. 'We have the time and you don't have the money' said they. Saddam for all his faults kept the lid on the pot we now see boiling over. We launched an illegal invasion and sent a country back to the dark ages and it was done on the back of lies. Saying we should have done more is a bit of an understatement and those actions make our leaders every bit as bad as Saddam.



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