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Ok, this is the next level bullsh*t

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posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

TD




posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

Yep.

The credit reporting agencies track purchases when at all possible to profile your credit risk based on purchases and where you shop. And they double dip by selling that info to marketers/merchants.

Couple of infamous cases...dude got his credit limit lowered during the financial crisis because he started shopping at Wal Mart for groceries.

Another case a Dad went ballistic because Target was sending ads to his house for his teenage daughter - for baby stuff, turned out she was preggers and Target knew based on purchases before the Dad knew. He wasn't happy.
edit on 1/12/2015 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:25 PM
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And here she is...


just to show I'm not talking out of my hat



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

I think a class action lawsuit is in order.

What say you ATS? Wanna make some $$$ for our privacy issues?



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:29 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Whammo...

Banks sell consumers' shopping data to retailers


Many of the nation's leading banks are using information about their customers' shopping habits -- how much they spend, where they shop, what they buy -- to make money.



The banks don't actually hand over your data to retailers. Instead, retailers describe what type of customer they'd like to target and the bank then sends the deal to customers who fit the profile. When the customer cashes in on the deal, the bank gets paid a commission.


$1.7 Billion dollars! No wonder why. TD Bank started their program in the fall of 2011. And the were LATE to the party.


Merchants pay banks an average fee of 10% to 15% of the purchase price of a product each time a customer uses a discount that's generated from the bank's data, according to Cardlytics, an intermediary that works with both banks and retailers.

edit on 12-1-2015 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis

the bastards! Let's get em



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:32 PM
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Maybe the add has been there all the time, you just didn't notice it and that's what made you buy that guitar, now that you have bought the guitar you notice the add....Hmmm

edit on 12-1-2015 by Mianeye because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:34 PM
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The reality is local retail stores are way behind on this.

You gave them your name- that had nothing to do with it. The'll try and mail you fliers on that, but that's about it.

When you process a transaction on a CC/DC, the retail stores don't do that in-house. It's sent out to third party companies (over phone lines, usually- can you believe it?) which record exactly what you purchased, where, when and for how much- and they process the transaction for a fee.

This is why a corner store has a $5 minimum purchase to use a credit card- they're not being greedy, they just can't make money on it. You buy your redbull- redbulls parent corporation sets the price they pay for the product and the price they charge for the product, setting the local establishments profit margin. Then Visa (or whomever) takes a cut of the transaction, usually a flat fee plus a percentage based on the total transaction cost.

Now information about what you bought, where you bought it, when you bought it, who you bought it from, etc is all in a database.
Ever read the privacy statement from a credit card company? It's about a hundred pages of "we will do whatever we want with your data and there isn't anything you can do about it"

Well, it doesn't take someone as big as google (or does it?) to offer visa money for access to certain aspects of that database. Namely, if they can pin a transaction source (cc number) to an internet user (anyone here use chrome? Great browser- EVERY SITE knows exactly who you are when you use it, all they have to do is ask the browser) and now they've linked the redbull you bought at the convenience store to your friend-face profile.

It's a targeted ad nightmare. I'm one of those people who wont watch TV or listen to the radio because I can't stand ads. I also live in a place where billboards are banned (although some companies don't seem to care) and I won't go on the internet without several layers of ad-blocking turned on... so I don't see it so much.... but I work in a field where I know it's there.

Targeted ads aren't smart yet- that's why you'll see something you bought marketed at you. Amazon is working on that, though- they'll show you what other people have bought with a given item. It will get better at what it does- and the ads will get more invasive.
It won't be long before billboards along a highway will changed based on what the highest number of people in a given range of it are known to buy. This is inevitable given a consumer driven world.

Have fun with it.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:36 PM
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originally posted by: FlySolo
a reply to: eisegesis

the bastards! Let's get em


Aite Group estimates that more than 460 million cardholders will be enrolled in the programs by 2015. (In most of cases, consumers are automatically enrolled in the merchant incentive programs, but they do have the right to opt out -- as required by bank regulations.)

How about passive aggressive?

Let start a world opt out day some time next month!



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: FlySolo
a reply to: kosmicjack

I think a class action lawsuit is in order.

What say you ATS? Wanna make some $$$ for our privacy issues?


Sorry- you've already lost.

You signed your privacy away with every TOS you clicked 'I agree' to.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:38 PM
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a reply to: Mianeye

no way jose!

I already wanted that guitar for some time just too chicken to part with my moolah.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 10:39 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

DOH!

ETA: actually, I take back my doh. If the banks are the ones selling off the info then it's them to go after, not FB. I never signed any privacy bull# with TD. They make too much money anyway. The banksters
edit on 12-1-2015 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:07 PM
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originally posted by: karmicecstasy
Fifty years from now. People who hate this. Are going to be thought of like the people who believed the earth was flat. The time to stop this was over 20 years ago. Welcome to the now. The earth wide Cheers bar......"Where everybody knows your name."



I just want to add that. I am not for targeted ads like this. Or for the corporations knowing everything about everyone. I was just saying that the time to fight this was 15 years ago. People said this would happen. No one listened. Now all the systems are in place. Our kids are used to it because they grew up with it. Their kids will grow up with worse. There is no going back now. We all should of fought this long, long, ago. Now if we try to fight this. Our kids will just call us dinosaurs while they continue to plug into the system. I am only 31 and I am considered weird by my peers for not having Facebook or any social media. Even my ten years old niece thinks its odd. I am afraid this battle is already over. Its too widespread.


edit on 12-1-2015 by karmicecstasy because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-1-2015 by karmicecstasy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:37 PM
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originally posted by: Yeahkeepwatchingme


Have a nice day and smile for all the cameras!
S + F


I can't believe I never heard this. Thank you!



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:41 PM
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You're never one foot away from an advertisement.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

It's called COOKIES, they've been around for 20 years but the ad nets have got really, REALLY, good at optimizing them.


I'll agree it's creepy at first, but, the next time you something that you didn't really know you needed appears in an ad, and you realize you DO NEED IT, then, my friend, you'll KNOW it's creepy.


Seriously though, it's nothing new or sneakier than the use of big data in a legacy piece of software hat's been around for (and helped pay for the internet you enjoy today I might add) a long, long, time.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Good taste in guitars. My friend has a 1972 Gibson Les Paul and he told me Epiphone is starting to put out nice stuff. You know he had to have one. Now he has both.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: Springer

Oh I know about cookies, I've written a few of them in my earlier IT years. This however, is a CAKE. The tag must have been on my debit card, via the bank, and right into Zuckerburger's lap. There was no online anything in this transaction that required cookies which is why this is at a whole new level. Just imagine if I had bought a car for my mistress without my wife knowing? Then seeing that car on our FB page.

Good thing I'm single.

That was in jest of course, but could you imagine? Ack!
edit on 13-1-2015 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 11:54 PM
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a reply to: LOSTinAMERICA

ah yes, she sounds beautiful. I have the Jamup app which has fantastic studio quality with the built in effects. Grundge crunch to classic blues with an 8 track to boot. Happy I made the purchase.



posted on Jan, 13 2015 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: FlySolo

Peek-a-boo
they see you



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