It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Source of 2004 Mystery Explosion Found in Antarctica?

page: 1
29

log in

join
share:
+7 more 
posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 12:42 PM
link   
On September 2, 2004, six infrasound detectors from around the world picked up the telltale signature of an exploding meteorite. Scientists at Australia's Davis Station on the coast of eastern Antarctica spotted a dust trail but not the object that had left it. In a 2007 paper, a team of scientists used data from International Monitoring System (IMS) infrasound arrays to fix the source of the explosion to somewhere over eastern Antarctica.

From Daily Mail:

Research by the Australian scientists after they saw the meteorite debris above Antarctica inn 2004 suggested that it was around seven to ten metres (23 to 33 feet) wide and weighted between 600 and 1,900 tonnes.

They estimated that it exploded in the sky above Antarctica with the force of 12,000 tonnes of TNT and was travelling at a speed of 29,080 mph.


Image Credit: Tobias Binder, Alfred Wegener Institute via Daily Mail

A decade later, the discovery of what appears to be a 1.24 mile wide crater may solve the mystery.

On December 24, Geophysicist, Dr. Christian Müller was looking out of the window of Polar 6, a Basler BT-67 outfitted with ice penetrating radar, when he spotted the large feature in the ice. Two days later, they flew over the site again to take images and video as well as a topographic laser survey.

Given the circumstantial evidence, the scientists are cautiously optimistic. The next step would likely be to send out a team to drill beneath the ice and snow to look for a dust layer and possibly fragments of the meteorite.
edit on 2015-1-12 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 12:59 PM
link   
A crater over a mile wide. Scary to think that some day, one of those will impact a city.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:13 PM
link   
a reply to: DAVID64

Agreed, I think it's only a matter of time. 23-33 feet wide and left a crater 1.24 miles wide, that's a lot of power, scary to think what a larger one could do. S + F.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: DAVID64
A crater over a mile wide. Scary to think that some day, one of those will impact a city.

Very true, although here the surface was most likely a bit more yielding, then again buildings would be even more yielding



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:36 PM
link   
Incredible. This would have made Chelyabinsk look like an M-80.
And it appears this one impacted at cosmic velocity.
Hard to believe it was not found sooner.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:40 PM
link   
a reply to: charlyv

Here's the hole in the ice from the biggest chunk of the Chelyabinsk meteor for comparison:




posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 07:37 PM
link   
I can't imagine what being inside the impact zone could be like when one of those crashes.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 08:09 PM
link   
a reply to: theantediluvian

Is there a permanently manned station in Antarctica ? How close is it to the alleged impact site to the East?

I wonder how far away the blast would be felt by a human (as opposed a sensitive electronic detector )

I hope it is an impact crater - though I have read some comments from experts saying it is unlikely.



posted on Jan, 13 2015 @ 12:25 AM
link   
Oh No crikey!!.....Havent these people seen the "Thing" and "Thing 2"?
.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 12:15 AM
link   

originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: charlyv

Here's the hole in the ice from the biggest chunk of the Chelyabinsk meteor for comparison:



Yes, this is what was left of the main mass of Chelyabinsk ,now a few feet in diameter, as it fell at near terminal velocity, with a push.

What hit the Antartic, was originally as big as Chelyabinsk before it was destroyed by the atmosphere, and made it through without losing much of cosmic velocity and the result was a crater over a mile wide. If it had been anywhere near a populated area, absolute devastation. An incredible reality, and one to head, as something like this, even hitting ocean, would most likely have caused a tsunami of epic proportion. A lucky miss, for many.

It was most likely an iron, since they are but the few that can pass through the atmosphere without exploding.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 04:54 AM
link   
Its a wonder it was not picked up on seismographs around the southern part of the world.

A crater 1.24 miles wide should have sent seismic waves around the world.

By the size of the crater i would put the yield of the impact at around 100 KT about 5 time the yield of the bombs that were dropped on japan.



posted on Jan, 14 2015 @ 06:31 AM
link   
a reply to: ANNED

That is a good point, and someone should check cause this seems off to me....in fact wasn't there a thread awhile back about a ufo crash in the antarctic in the last decade?



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 08:06 PM
link   
Chelyabinsk meteorite fragment of 654 kg youtu.be...
edit on 15/1/15 by mangust69 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2015 @ 10:22 PM
link   
Good job it blows up in the atmosphere.
if it had been solid and hit the ground!!!
OMG!



posted on Jan, 17 2015 @ 08:02 AM
link   
a reply to: theantediluvian

F&S&


...The really scary thing imho, is this thing exploded in the sky above Antarctica. ....Anyone know what the effect might have been if it stayed intact and actually hit the surface?



new topics

top topics



 
29

log in

join