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The Hill Star Map and Exoplanets - Part 2: Analysis and NASA's Exo-S Mission (VIDEO)

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posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 03:01 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: Erno86
a reply to: JadeStar

Including NASA's search for exoplanets, it might also be advantageous for them too also search for rogue mini black holes,


This is out of my area as I am not really well versed in high energy physics but you'd have to expect that such rogue mini black holes would be both very rare, and virtually undetectable to us.

How does one for instance, form a mini black hole naturally? A stellar mass black hole would have the area at least of a city. Is that what you mean by mini?

And as you know, the only way we can detect black holes presently involves either their effects on something else like a nearby star it orbits or a gas cloud it is eating or through microlensing events.


since it might be possible for a civilization to harvest a black hole, so as to incorporate a micro-mini black hole into a starship as in the heart of the propulsion unit; onboard a superluminal capable starship.

Find a rogue mini-black hole....then search for any nearby star systems that have exoplanets --- and we may as yet --- locate a interstellar wayfaring civilization.



Sounds like as good an idea as any. Look for NASA's WFIRST/AFTA mission in about 9-10 years to possibly shed some light on that when it launches. It's primary mission is microlensing and probing "dark matter" so it would seem a natural to look for such elusive objects but without knowing the definition of micro-mini black holes its kind of hard to set up a search strategy to address them.


A mini black hole the size of a city might serve a a target for an antimatter bomb that might be able to blow it into tiny bits --- grab a small piece of the black hole rubble --- tractor beam it to a factory on an isolated asteroid --- incorporate a micro-mini black hole with the approx. size of an atom and make it the heart of photon propulsion unit onboard a saucer starship.




posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 11:02 PM
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mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 05:28 AM
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originally posted by: 1ofthe9
mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



Then why isn't MUFON doing it? Don't say money. I've seen their tax filings. Their #1 spend is on their yearly convention $100,000!?!?!?!

I've been to professional astronomical conventions which don't cost that much.

So where does the money go? Speakers?



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 06:56 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Those pesky administrative costs. I read here yesterday that 73 percent of the ice-bucket challenge money from a few months ago went to administrative costs and not to research (and probably the part that went to research was eaten up by 'administrative costs' on that end). The front office is the place to be with some of these outfits, or being the favorite restaurant of the people in the front office (I went to the offices of a major religious entertainer on television - his church and building were in another location, but his private offices were in another close-by city - and the entire parking lot was full of high-end top-shelf cars. So much for filling his donation bucket).



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9
mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



Then why isn't MUFON doing it? Don't say money. I've seen their tax filings. Their #1 spend is on their yearly convention $100,000!?!?!?!

I've been to professional astronomical conventions which don't cost that much.

So where does the money go? Speakers?


This is actually a good question. They have tablets and software on the MUFON TV series... Do any of the organizations have an interest in field research? I know that one group actually set up a magnetic anomaly detector - and that was really interesting. Doing such a thing would be even easier now - this is the age of Arduino and IP networking.

Granted, MUFON works for Bigelow now so we'd have to be pleading with him regardless. I've still had no luck finding any kind of communications channel to the major players to plead my case unfortunately. Joe Firmage would probably be worth hitting up. Would you know if any of the ex-NIDS guys would act as a backchannel?

Do you think ATS could help? :/



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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originally posted by: Aleister
a reply to: JadeStar

Those pesky administrative costs. I read here yesterday that 73 percent of the ice-bucket challenge money from a few months ago went to administrative costs and not to research (and probably the part that went to research was eaten up by 'administrative costs' on that end). The front office is the place to be with some of these outfits, or being the favorite restaurant of the people in the front office (I went to the offices of a major religious entertainer on television - his church and building were in another location, but his private offices were in another close-by city - and the entire parking lot was full of high-end top-shelf cars. So much for filling his donation bucket).



It's not administrative costs. Those were listed separately. It really is just on the convention. You can see for yourself.

My view is MUFON is not really interested in the scientific study of UFOs. They haven't done anything beyond gathering eyewitness sighting reports. That's 1950s thinking. They have had the opportunity to set up a network of cameras similar to meteor cameras across the nation to capture transient sky phenomena but they declined funding it.

Say what you want but it appears that they only serve to perpetuate stories not scientifically investigate a phenomena.
edit on 22-1-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9
mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



Then why isn't MUFON doing it? Don't say money. I've seen their tax filings. Their #1 spend is on their yearly convention $100,000!?!?!?!

I've been to professional astronomical conventions which don't cost that much.

So where does the money go? Speakers?


This is actually a good question. They have tablets and software on the MUFON TV series... Do any of the organizations have an interest in field research? I know that one group actually set up a magnetic anomaly detector - and that was really interesting. Doing such a thing would be even easier now - this is the age of Arduino and IP networking.

Granted, MUFON works for Bigelow now so we'd have to be pleading with him regardless. I've still had no luck finding any kind of communications channel to the major players to plead my case unfortunately. Joe Firmage would probably be worth hitting up. Would you know if any of the ex-NIDS guys would act as a backchannel?

Do you think ATS could help? :/


I think MUFON is probably a lost cause and of course ATS could help. In theory ATS could set up its own camera/magnetometer set up.

Individual ATS members would set them up and they would be coordinated by an ATS science board. Where MUFON failed to keep pace with technology ATS could thrive.



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 05:02 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar
I think MUFON is probably a lost cause and of course ATS could help. In theory ATS could set up its own camera/magnetometer set up.
Individual ATS members would set them up and they would be coordinated by an ATS science board. Where MUFON failed to keep pace with technology ATS could thrive.


Hi Jadestar, something like this? Regards.
Multiple Anomaly Detection & Automated Recording



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 05:54 AM
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originally posted by: Agnost

originally posted by: JadeStar
I think MUFON is probably a lost cause and of course ATS could help. In theory ATS could set up its own camera/magnetometer set up.
Individual ATS members would set them up and they would be coordinated by an ATS science board. Where MUFON failed to keep pace with technology ATS could thrive.


Hi Jadestar, something like this? Regards.
Multiple Anomaly Detection & Automated Recording


Exactly!



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 01:00 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar
Excellent research!
Though I must say:
This is not the only scientifically testable abductee claim.
There is also physical medical evidence. Have you ever heard of Dr. Roger Leir?
www.ufocasebook.com...
He's X-rayed hundreds of abductees and found strange metal implants that have been taken to metallurgy labs and electron microscopes. They have found bizarre quantities of metals not usually in the human body, as well as elements common in meteors.
So there is a little more science to it than you think. There are also medically examinable lacerations and injuries, though I will admit that those are somewhat dubious and that Roger Leir's implants are arguably the most scientifically testable of the evidence presented thus far.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 08:52 AM
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originally posted by: SpaceOverlord
a reply to: JadeStar
Excellent research!
Though I must say:
This is not the only scientifically testable abductee claim.
There is also physical medical evidence. Have you ever heard of Dr. Roger Leir?
www.ufocasebook.com...
He's X-rayed hundreds of abductees and found strange metal implants that have been taken to metallurgy labs and electron microscopes. They have found bizarre quantities of metals not usually in the human body, as well as elements common in meteors.
So there is a little more science to it than you think. There are also medically examinable lacerations and injuries, though I will admit that those are somewhat dubious and that Roger Leir's implants are arguably the most scientifically testable of the evidence presented thus far.


The problem is that these "implants" have never been tested properly. For these things to actually do something, they must be technological, not just a bit of "something". They see to be just "bits" of something; rock meteor, whatever, but absolutely NOT anything technological, thus the implants are just random bits of material that go imbedded in someone. By the way, a bit f meteorite could easily "hit" some one, imbed itself in their body, and they may not know it happened, which appears to be the case.



posted on Apr, 7 2015 @ 09:05 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9
mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



Then why isn't MUFON doing it? Don't say money. I've seen their tax filings. Their #1 spend is on their yearly convention $100,000!?!?!?!

I've been to professional astronomical conventions which don't cost that much.

So where does the money go? Speakers?


This is actually a good question. They have tablets and software on the MUFON TV series... Do any of the organizations have an interest in field research? I know that one group actually set up a magnetic anomaly detector - and that was really interesting. Doing such a thing would be even easier now - this is the age of Arduino and IP networking.

Granted, MUFON works for Bigelow now so we'd have to be pleading with him regardless. I've still had no luck finding any kind of communications channel to the major players to plead my case unfortunately. Joe Firmage would probably be worth hitting up. Would you know if any of the ex-NIDS guys would act as a backchannel?

Do you think ATS could help? :/


I think MUFON is probably a lost cause and of course ATS could help. In theory ATS could set up its own camera/magnetometer set up.

Individual ATS members would set them up and they would be coordinated by an ATS science board. Where MUFON failed to keep pace with technology ATS could thrive.


Of what use / help would a magnetometer be? They are not difficult to construct, simple components, etc...

All sky cameras are easy to set up and not all that expensive. I'm including one in my observatory simply because they are inexpensive. Though, I will spend more than necessary...perhaps up $600 or so.



posted on Apr, 8 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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originally posted by: tanka418

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 1ofthe9
mrobsr.blogspot.ca... JadeStar we're gonna need to convince people to do a proper skywatch.
I had high hopes for Identification alas.

I still think we need another shot at Skinwalker Ranch. We got stuff now that NIDS couldn't dream of back in the day. Persistent autonomous and covert surveillance devices, drones (tethered balloons), all kinds of electronic noisemakers. Hell. We could *bug* the cattle...



Then why isn't MUFON doing it? Don't say money. I've seen their tax filings. Their #1 spend is on their yearly convention $100,000!?!?!?!

I've been to professional astronomical conventions which don't cost that much.

So where does the money go? Speakers?


This is actually a good question. They have tablets and software on the MUFON TV series... Do any of the organizations have an interest in field research? I know that one group actually set up a magnetic anomaly detector - and that was really interesting. Doing such a thing would be even easier now - this is the age of Arduino and IP networking.

Granted, MUFON works for Bigelow now so we'd have to be pleading with him regardless. I've still had no luck finding any kind of communications channel to the major players to plead my case unfortunately. Joe Firmage would probably be worth hitting up. Would you know if any of the ex-NIDS guys would act as a backchannel?

Do you think ATS could help? :/


I think MUFON is probably a lost cause and of course ATS could help. In theory ATS could set up its own camera/magnetometer set up.

Individual ATS members would set them up and they would be coordinated by an ATS science board. Where MUFON failed to keep pace with technology ATS could thrive.


Of what use / help would a magnetometer be? They are not difficult to construct, simple components, etc...


On its own a magnetometer is of little use. But paired with an automated camera it could provide valuable data.

For instance, if the camera records a strange event and the magnetometer also logs a significant deviation then you now have a correlation that would tend to rule out birds, bugs, etc in the camera video.

You might also find the source of the "UFO" event was something like an upper atmospheric phenomena like the auroras seen near the poles, or a form of lightning or something else entirely.

Magnetometers can detect things like solar storms and other things which if correlated with a rise in UFO sightings might also provide a clue as to a potential electrodynamic driven physiological cause for why people see what they say the do when they do.

And of course there are the stories of people who claim that some UFOs are actual structured craft which use technology which alters the local magnetic field.

So a magnetometer would be a tool to collect data to examine different possible causes for what was caught on camera.



All sky cameras are easy to set up and not all that expensive. I'm including one in my observatory simply because they are inexpensive. Though, I will spend more than necessary...perhaps up $600 or so.


That should be enough. I own and operate an all sky meteor cam using a Watec 902H Ultimate, which is the same camera the stations of NASA's CAMS All Sky Network and many American Meteor Society members use because it is very sensitive.

You'll log some nice meteors and brilliant fireballs with it at your observatory

edit on 8-4-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2015 @ 05:24 PM
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JadeStar have you ever heard about fireball optical effects like on these MIRVs?

If we stuck one at Dinosaur National Monument's visitor center, we'd have some nice coverage. The All Sky Network would be a great resource for anomaly detection. CMOR would be fun to tap too!

...They don't have API's do they?



posted on May, 12 2015 @ 03:50 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: 0bserver1
Should there be a reason that both Zeta reticuli 1 and 2 are not of interest by NASA ?
one should think they are not allowed to do research on those two star systems . But that's just speculation of course. .



They are both of interest to NASA and they have both appeared on other star lists NASA made (High Resoluton Microwave Survey aka NASA SETI, Terrestrial Planet Finder Interferometer 500 star list, Space Interferometry Mission PlanetQuest list).

The reason I think they do not appear on this list is the same reason the nearest star system, Alpha Centauri is not on the list.

As explained in the paper:


3.3 Target Lists
Our target list excludes binary stars with close
companions. Alpha Centauri A/B are
specifically excluded because their large size
results in the shadow converging in front of the
telescope. This applies at the standard
distances set for the three observing bands. It
may be possible to carry out the Alpha Cen
observations with the starshade moved closer
to the telescope and this will be studied further
and addressed in the Final Report.


So it stands to reason if they approve Alpha Centauri then Zeta Reticuli might also be approved in the Final Report (which I will keep an eye out for.)


Just following up my own post.

And now Zeta 1 Reticuli (HD 20766) and Zeta 2 Reticuli (HD 20807) do appear on this NASA/Caltech list for future direct imaging space telescope missions.


Properties of Nearby Stars
The following is a list of properties for known stars within 30 pc. The current (version 1) list uses Hipparcos as its foundation; future releases will include additional low-mass stars that are not bright enough at visible wavelengths for Hipparcos detection. Only an illustrative portion of the dataset is shown here; the attached spreadsheet has many additional columns.

This catalog was assembled by M. Turnbull, additional notes on the data can be downloadedhere .



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