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Anymore Voyager Pictures??

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posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:45 AM
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Voyager1 has entered interstellar Space as of August 2012 and Voyager2 is now in the Heliosheath-the outermost layer of the heliosphere where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar gas. The Voyager mission is now 38yrs old after showing us stunning images from the outer planets, and additionally, now the Voyager mission has been extended into the Voyager Interstellar Mission (VIM), which is slated to explore the outermost edge of the Sun's domain. And beyond.



The twin Voyager 1 and 2 spacecraft are exploring where nothing from Earth has flown before. Continuing on their more-than-35-year journey since their 1977 launches, they each are much farther away from Earth and the sun than Pluto. In August 2012, Voyager 1 made the historic entry into interstellar space, the region between stars, filled with material ejected by the death of nearby stars millions of years ago. Scientists hope to learn more about this region when Voyager 2, in the “heliosheath" -- the outermost layer of the heliosphere where the solar wind is slowed by the pressure of interstellar medium -- also reaches interstellar space. Both spacecraft are still sending scientific information about their surroundings through the Deep Space Network, or DSN.


Here my question......If the Voyager(s) are still sending information via the DSN (Deep Space Network) are there any images? If so, when will we get to see what's out there outside of the solar system? Anymore pictures Voyager? I wanna know.....What says ATS?

voyager.jpl.nasa.gov...




posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

A selfie of the Solar System? I'd tweet it (if I tweeted). Thanks for a thought-provoking OP, OP.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:48 AM
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There is nothing there to reflect light so all it would do is take images of blackness. It could image the solar system but maybe that is not of much interest. Takes precious power to turn a camera.
edit on 11-1-2015 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:50 AM
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I found this.


edit on 11-1-2015 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:51 AM
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originally posted by: eManym
There is nothing there to reflect light so all it would do is take images of blackness. It could image the solar system but maybe that is not of much interest. Takes precious power to turn a camera.


Hmm... Not so sure about that!



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 01:04 AM
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As some one said it takes energy to run the camera. it was turned off to conserve the RTG battery. The RTG is nearing the end of its life and nearly all power is necessary to transmit at a power level that we can receive and get data out of. that's not much but it still takes nearly all of the RTG power. Eventually sometime within the next few years most likely; the RTG will not be able to produce enough power to send a readable signal and power the remaining instruments. one by one the instruments will be turned off.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 01:30 AM
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When the last of its' power is almost gone, they should turn it towards the center of the galaxy and take one last picture. It'd have to be a fairly long-exposure photo, I would imagine, but I'll bet it'd be amazing.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 01:44 AM
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originally posted by: AdmireTheDistance
When the last of its' power is almost gone, they should turn it towards the center of the galaxy and take one last picture. It'd have to be a fairly long-exposure photo, I would imagine, but I'll bet it'd be amazing.


I think when we get VASIMR or NTR or Fusion or EM drives we should go out and replace the RTG and upgrade all the components. then point it towards alpha proxima, Alpha centauri A and Alpha centauri B and speed boost it with the interceptor's engines. it would still take several thousand years to get there but it could take and send back readings and photos the entire way.

It's 17 light hours out now. And it took 36 years to get that far, but some of those propulsion technologies could easily lap it in a few years.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 02:08 AM
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originally posted by: lostbook
Here my question......If the Voyager(s) are still sending information via the DSN (Deep Space Network) are there any images? If so, when will we get to see what's out there outside of the solar system? Anymore pictures Voyager? I wanna know.....What says ATS?

voyager.jpl.nasa.gov...


At the FAQ on the site you linked, yours is the very first question:




Question: Can the Voyager imaging cameras be turned back on?

Answer: It is possible for the cameras to be turned on, but it is not a priority for Voyager's Interstellar Mission. After Voyager 1 took its last image (the "Solar System Family Portrait" in 1990), the cameras were turned off to save power and memory for the instruments expected to detect the new charged particle environment of interstellar space. Mission managers removed the software from both spacecraft that controls the camera. The computers on the ground that understand the software and analyze the images do not exist anymore. The cameras and their heaters have also been exposed for years to the very cold conditions at the deep reaches of our solar system. Even if mission managers recreated the computers on the ground, reloaded the software onto the spacecraft and were able to turn the cameras back on, it is not clear that they would work.

In addition, it is very dark where the Voyagers are now. While you could still see some brighter stars and some of the planets with the cameras, you can actually see these stars and planets better with amateur telescopes on Earth.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 02:52 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

Great answer, thanks.

~~~


when will we get to see what's out there outside of the solar system

You can see what's outside the Solar System from Earth, or from space telescopes orbiting earth. It's not like our system is behind some sort of curtain that makes the rest of the universe invisible.

Also, the Voyagers have a fairly basic camera, it won't give you much apart from some of the brightest stars. Stuff in the outer Solar System (like comets in the Oort cloud and planetoids in the Kuiper belt) are too small and too sparsely locate to take a picture of them. The New Horizons probe is more useful in that regard, as it will be actually visiting Pluto and (hopefully) other objects out there.

Bottom line - space is very dark and very, very empty.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

Thanks. Too bad we don't have a way to get more power to it.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 11:14 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

I hope the New Horizons spacecraft (scheduled for a fly-by of Pluto in July of this year) will take a picture of our Sun from out there.


edit on 1/11/2015 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: Saint Exupery

Great answer, thanks.

~~~


when will we get to see what's out there outside of the solar system

You can see what's outside the Solar System from Earth, or from space telescopes orbiting earth. It's not like our system is behind some sort of curtain that makes the rest of the universe invisible.

Also, the Voyagers have a fairly basic camera, it won't give you much apart from some of the brightest stars. Stuff in the outer Solar System (like comets in the Oort cloud and planetoids in the Kuiper belt) are too small and too sparsely locate to take a picture of them. The New Horizons probe is more useful in that regard, as it will be actually visiting Pluto and (hopefully) other objects out there.

Bottom line - space is very dark and very, very empty.


by now every voyager component from it's computers to memory to transmitters is a prehistoric fossil.Even it's RTG can be much improved with more efficient thermionic power converters (it is now possible to get quite a lot more power out of the same mass of RTG.) it could have lidars (to characterize the nature of the interstellar medium (WRT grit, pea gravel, rocks boulders and ice balls), radars, low light cameras and strobe, uv filters and an active uv iluminator, ir filters and an active ir iluminator, digital zoom, optical zoom, a telescope... more sensors like a laser spectrometer for near by objects ( just in case) and a passive spectrometer for more distant objects. we have technology that could triple, quadruple or quintuple its current travel speed, add basic search and scan AI, give it a ion drive...
edit on 11-1-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook
a reply to: Saint Exupery

Thanks. Too bad we don't have a way to get more power to it.


we do. But it's not economical. Even though romantically i wish we could go out and rebuild it with modern technology just for nostalgic reasons.

we could however; build a Voyager 3 and give it all new tech and ion or EM propulsion. EM would be better because it does not use propelant as a working medium. we could theoretically give it the means to continuously accelerate to the limits imposed by relativity powered by a improved RTG or a trash can sized nuclear reactor. it could reach Proxima Centauri in something less than 100 years as opposed to the 70 thousand it would take voyage 1 and 2. and it could "take pictures" the entire way. so no waiting 100 years for the science to start.

such a mission would use EM thrust to accelerate and use an M2P2 for stellar wind deaccelration at the target system.
It would require a mini nuke power plant at a cost of approximately 5 million from GE or Hitachi. it would need an uprated radio or laser transmitter easily powered by the reactor. it needs about 5 MW for broadband equivalent data transmission and a 500 AU comms relay at the solar lagrange point. (this would unfortunately double the price of the mission)

it would need frontal armor tuned for the speeds it will be going. wiffle shield, ice block, shear thickening fluid, molten curtain drop radiator, angled tungsten plate, ablative and supplemented by M2P2 Plasma bubble for the little stuff.

other than that semi automnous AI to make timely mission decisions in situ would be necessary.

a couple of HP stack computers. 100 petabytess of storage.

The most modern sensors science can devise. all of them. and a kitchen sink and commode.



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