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Spy agency planning false-flag terror acts in crowded areas, whistleblower claims

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posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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A Turkish whistleblower, who has a credible record of predicting police operations and government policies, has made a shocking claim, arguing that the Turkish spy agency is planning false-flag operations to blow up crowded areas to frame the Gülen movement as a terrorist organization.

Fuat Avni said early on Saturday that the President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan initially planned to use Dec. 14 raids against the media to announce the Gülen movement as a terrorist organization, but he had to resort to other ways as the previous plan failed. The whistleblower said Erdoğan approved of the false-flag operations.

Spy agency planning false-flag terror acts in crowded areas, whistleblower claims

I had never heard of this movement before, but after reading about it I wouldn't be surprised if some see it as a threat (or cult). It sounds a little bizarre.


The movement has attracted supporters and critics in Turkey, Central Asia, and in other parts of the world. The movement is active in education with private schools and universities in over 140 countries as well as many American charter schools operated by followers. It has initiated forums for interfaith dialogue. It has substantial investments in media, finance, and for–profit health clinics.[1][2] Some have praised the movement as a pacifist, modern-oriented version of Islam, and as an alternative to more extreme schools of Islam such as Salafism.[3] However, an editorial in the The Guardian described his Gülen movement as having "some of the characteristics of a cult".[4]


Not really sure what to think of this whistleblower. I usually don't trust these kinds of reports, but it he has a good track record this is much more interesting than the regular nonsense that gets pooped out all over the internet.

Really hoping this is false, and that there are no attacks against innocent civilians to further a cause. We could stand to go a few days without innocent people minding their own business being killed and the ensuing backlash, especially if the killings are a false flag.

Anyone have any more info on this? I'm going to do some more reading and post what I find, but would appreciate help because this has really piqued my interest.




posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 06:32 PM
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Questions have arisen about the Gülen movement's possible involvement in the ongoing Ergenekon investigation,[41] which critics have characterized as "a pretext" by the government "to neutralize dissidents" in Turkey.[42] In March 2011, seven Turkish journalists were arrested, including Ahmet Şık, who had been writing a book, "Imamin Ordusu" (The Imam's Army),[43] which alleges that the Gülen movement has infiltrated the country's security forces. As Şık was taken into police custody, he shouted, "Whoever touches it [the movement] gets burned!".[44] Upon his arrest, drafts of the book were confiscated and its possession was banned. Şık has also been charged with being part of the alleged Ergenekon plot, despite being an investigator of the plot before his arrest.[45]


Link



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Yes, this reminded me of Serena Shim.

She was an American journalist working in Turkey for Iran's Press TV.

She was killed in a car crash just a few days after saying she had been threatened by Turkish Intelligence services over her reporting on the siege of Kobane, "after one of her reports suggested ISIS militants were being smuggled back and forth over the Syrian border in the back of aid vehicles." That is the border between Syria and Turkey. She was in a rental car and it collided with a "heavy vehicle". There is much suspicion about her death.

I think your thread here only adds fuel to the fire of what she was reporting immediately prior to her death.










edit on 10-1-2015 by lonesomerimbaud because: punctuation.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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So from what I've been reading it sounds like there are some pretty good reasons to want to blame the Gülen movement.

It appears that they may be infiltrating the government (for better or worse, probably better) by educating people (theey set up schools), grooming them and helping to get them into key government positions. From the tiny bit I've read so far it sounds like they used to be aligned with Erdogan, but are now actively trying to oust him. This whole thing is actually very interesting.

One of the issues with this whistleblower is that he is accused of being a part of the movement, and is attempting to make Erdogan look bad. It's thought the account may be getting it's information from multiple sources, some going as far as to suggest it may be Erdogan's wife.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 07:36 PM
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We're assuming you've arrived at this website because you are a parent or teacher at a Gulen charter school. You've somehow found out about allegations that your school is associated with a Turkish Muslim preacher and leader called Fethullah Gulen, or with the Gulen Movement (the name given to his network of followers around the world).

Or, perhaps you are a concerned community member, who has heard about the rapidly growing chain of Gulen charter schools now numbering 140 and operating in 26 states in the US.

You might also be someone who has been invited to travel to Turkey on a trip that, you've been told, is supposed to increase cultural understanding.



A Guide to the Gulen Movement's Activities in the US

Hmmm.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

I know, right? I can't believe I've never heard about any of this until now. I don't know enough about the group, but the more I read the more worried I become.

There are a ton of interesting angles with this news. Civilians possibly being targeted by a government to blame this movement, what this movement is actually up to and perhaps why our tax dollars are helping.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 07:44 PM
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Reminded me of the 1998 X files "FIght the Future" movie.

Maybe we should call in a bomb threat to Houston. I think it's free beer night at the astrodome.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Little MSM exposure perhaps for a reason.



Among the documents that the state attorneys presented, there are claims about the Gülen movement's financial structure and it was emphasized that the movement's economic power reached $25 billion. "Schools, newspapers, universities, unions, television channels . . . The relationship among these are being debated. There is no transparency in their work," claimed the attorneys. They continued, "Gülen's own statements indicate that he is a religious man who spreads his philosophy through education; however, he is not an educator."

CIA Suspicion in Gulen's Refusal



lots of conspiracies connected with the Gulens.

I'll wait for more responses before commenting any further.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

Please don't wait to comment more, no one else seems interested at all. The teleporting dog is getting more attention.

I'm trying to read up more on this group, get my head around politics in Turkey and watch the football game. While sick.

This group reminds me of a certain religion we've heard about before. Not comfortable denouncing them since I have such little knowledge, but they seem sketchy. Now that's not to say I have a problem with them screwing with what's-his-face.



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

There's a lot of hidden things with the Gulens.

I'll throw some tidbits and see who responds and proceed with caution.

Keep in mind the MSM is controlled.


Obama's ties to the Gulen movement and the future of U.S.-Turkey relations


Gulenists were major donors to Obama's 2012 campaign - What will they ask in return?




posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 09:53 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

I'm interested, enough to read Xuenchen's link, oh and I also left a stupid comment on the teleporting dog thread!



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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A powerful digital spying tool used by governments to monitor its citizens has been linked to a failed attack on a US citizen.

The US woman believes she was the target of this cyber-attack because of her outspoken criticism of the Gülen movement, which has infiltrated parts of the Turkish government. The woman, who doesn't want to be identified over fears of retaliation and who spoke anonymously to Wired, received a highly-tailored spear-phishing email purporting to be from a Harvard professor who has previously written about the Gülen movement.

The email contained a link to a website in Turkey which hosted malicious software which would be downloaded to your PC if you simply clicked on the link. The woman sensed a problem with the email and on closer inspection of the email address saw it was sent from an @hawhard.edu address rather than the expected @harvard.edu.



Turkey's Gulen Movement Linked to Cyber-Attack on US Citizen

proceeding with caution.




posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 03:08 AM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
The email contained a link to a website in Turkey which hosted malicious software which would be downloaded to your PC if you simply clicked on the link. The woman sensed a problem with the email and on closer inspection of the email address saw it was sent from an @hawhard.edu address rather than the expected @harvard.edu.


Just throwing this out there... spoofing an email address is pretty easy to do. If the people that sent this weren't even capable of doing that you can rule out them having any competent cyber division which means it didn't come from a government agency.



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