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A cheap telescope? for around 150 quid?.

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posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:04 PM
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I want to get more into astronomy and will be getting a telescope next pay day so any tips?.
I really don't know and have looked at many sites but all appear to be saying different things?.
Any help would be much appreciated.




posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:12 PM
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Try here

www.telescope.com...


Dont get a box store telescope or you will get frustrated and quit. You can get a quality at a low cost.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

I second that I have bought 2 scopes through them. A 8in dobbs and a 10 cassi pleased with both.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:14 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

Any tips on what I should be looking for though? I really have no idea but I would love to see the rings of saturn or moons of jupiter.
Or am I asking too much for such little cash?.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:15 PM
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This is a great page for beginners..
Loads of info.

www.scopereviews.com...

And welcome to the astronomy club...



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:17 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

Cheers

Love you guys xxx



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:18 PM
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originally posted by: boymonkey74
a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

Any tips on what I should be looking for though? I really have no idea but I would love to see the rings of saturn or moons of jupiter.
Or am I asking too much for such little cash?.



Those targets might be a little out of you price range. You need at least a four inch scope to gather the light needed.
Refractors are the easiest for beginners, and. Well just read the link I sent you and he will answer all of your questions.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

What about this one it has a 4.5 inch one.

uk.telescope.com...



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:22 PM
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I recommend refractors as well, the last thing you need to worry about is culminating the primary mirror on a Newtonian. That can get aggravating.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:23 PM
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a reply to: boymonkey74

Number one, a reflector as opposed to a refractor. 4 inch mirror, minimum.

Refractor images deteriorate especially at higher powers. Reflector images travel through less glass. Not just the scope body and brand name is critical but the lenses you choose and the location, location, location to view from. Its a science. Read up on member suggestions before you buy. Maybe it will cost more than a paycheck.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:28 PM
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Check in your area for star party's and get in touch with someone than can let you try one out.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: boymonkey74


I can't stress enough, don't purchase on price alone. Get quality.
Learn all you can, do the research then buy.
A good pair of binoculars will let you see four of jupitors moons. Barely...lol



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:29 PM
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Hey guys, while your giving out advice


I would like something that could do long range terrestrial as well as gazing at the moon.

It is somewhere to start. I would like to try at this level before I go into any thing else.

Now, effectively, I only have one eye so binoculars are out.

Any advice?

P



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:32 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: boymonkey74

Number one, a reflector as opposed to a refractor. 4 inch mirror, minimum.

Refractor images deteriorate especially at higher powers. Reflector images travel through less glass. Not just the scope body and brand name is critical but the lenses you choose and the location, location, location to view from. Its a science. Read up on member suggestions before you buy. Maybe it will cost more than a paycheck.



Not for a beginner. Refractors are much easier to use and maintain. Learn with them and then more on to more advanced models.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

You need a refactor for terrestrial. Reflectors are useless for that. And don't buy based on magnification. High magnification blurs and is useless.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 08:49 PM
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a reply to: pheonix358

Try a spotting scope, you can do a lot with them and also do what's called digi scoping.
edit on 8-1-2015 by hillbilly4rent because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 10:05 PM
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Best bang for your buck, get a good, used dobsonian mounted newt. A simple light bucket will give you many hours of pleasurable viewing. The only thing about dobs is you pretty much have to star hop- thought they do make some with alt/az rings on the base. I've owned both cassegrain reflecting scopes and dobs, as well as the odd refractor or two, and I've found the dob is the quickest to get set up quickly. I like my cass for longer viewing sessions. Also, can't do astrophotography with a dob mounted newt. For a good selection of used scopes, check out the cloundynights forums. They have a for sale section that I've found pretty reputable (haven't been scammed on there...yet).

**Orion makes a great line of low cost dobs as well as more expensive scopes.
edit on 8-1-2015 by JJRichey because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 10:31 PM
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The key to buying a good astronomical telescope, is not magnification (as often advertised for cheap retail store scopes), but the diameter of the main mirror / lens. The wider the telescope, the more light it can gather (and things in space are often very faint) and the sharper the image will be.

A Newtonian reflector is a generally good suggestion, such as this one.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71


You need a refactor for terrestrial. Reflectors are useless for that.

Beg your pardon?

The better the telescope the better the image quality, regardless. In fact the less lenses the light travels through the less distortion added to the picture in the eye piece.

Thats why reflectors are the best for image quality.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: boymonkey74

Since your interest seem planetary bodies, a refractor will give better contrast in the lower side bracket of cost. Even the cheapest refractor will allow to see ring of saturn and the major moon of Jupiter.

With a very limited budget and being your very first scope, i would recommend that you don't put too much emphasis on the optical quality, but pay attention to the qualities of the mount. There is nothing more frustrating for a beginner than a shacky cheap mount. If you buy a cheap one, consider making a mount by yourself using wood or couple parts of iron pipes.

After some time using it you'll see if you want to buy/make something serious.



edit on 2015-1-8 by PeterMcFly because: (no reason given)




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