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Is it a poor mindset? An atheist mindset? What causes paranoia?

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posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:52 PM
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I've experienced both poverty and money.

I was born into poverty, my mom got sick, and my dad split. My mom refused assistance, but my grade school principle "adopted" us.

When I was a teenager my mom married a millionaire.

Religion or non-religion has nothing to do with how charitable someone is.

When you have nothing, everything is about life, real life. Not only your own, but everyone else's as well.

When you have money, and start accumulating "stuff" ---- life becomes about keeping your stuff.

It's really pretty much that simple.




posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: Klassified

No, actually there isn't. Faith IS calculated trust. It's just that not everyone's calculations are the same.


While I agree to some degree, I also believe that a certain amount of 'faith' is inherent to our biology. One has to have enough faith, in something, to get out of bed in the morning. Each breath is predicated on the faith that air will be available. Perhaps not the best example but it does make my point clear.

Faith is necessary for basic will to survive. Suicide is a symptom of lack of that basic faith.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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originally posted by: LesMisanthrope
a reply to: TzarChasm

More strange analogies. Speaking about the topic at hand is quite useful.

My only point is: atheists practice theology. That's it.


No - theology isn't the right word, perhaps anti or inverse - theology. We tend to talk about what is there and unseen in the absent of a 'theo'. Or anyway that is my tendency.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: Annee
I've experienced both poverty and money.

I was born into poverty, my mom got sick, and my dad split. My mom refused assistance, but my grade school principle "adopted" us.

When I was a teenager my mom married a millionaire.

Religion or non-religion has nothing to do with how charitable someone is.

When you have nothing, everything is about life, real life. Not only your own, but everyone else's as well.

When you have money, and start accumulating "stuff" ---- life becomes about keeping your stuff.

It's really pretty much that simple.


Charity - is dependent on the act of giving something to someone else that means something to you. Not giving something you won't miss.

And this is the point, when I give a rescue mission $20 I conciously choose to go without something of that value so that I can, a millionaire and drop $10K on that same mission and not give up a thing.

Charity - is actually giving of 'yourself' not your money.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 02:13 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Annee
I've experienced both poverty and money.

I was born into poverty, my mom got sick, and my dad split. My mom refused assistance, but my grade school principle "adopted" us.

When I was a teenager my mom married a millionaire.

Religion or non-religion has nothing to do with how charitable someone is.

When you have nothing, everything is about life, real life. Not only your own, but everyone else's as well.

When you have money, and start accumulating "stuff" ---- life becomes about keeping your stuff.

It's really pretty much that simple.


Charity - is dependent on the act of giving something to someone else that means something to you. Not giving something you won't miss.

And this is the point, when I give a rescue mission $20 I conciously choose to go without something of that value so that I can, a millionaire and drop $10K on that same mission and not give up a thing.

Charity - is actually giving of 'yourself' not your money.


Charity is far broader then that. Have you been at the receiving end of charity?

I don't have to choose to go without to offer free babysitting to a mom who needs a break or has a doctor appointment.

I don't support blaming those who have money because I dont.


edit on 12-1-2015 by Annee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: Annee

originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: Annee
I've experienced both poverty and money.

I was born into poverty, my mom got sick, and my dad split. My mom refused assistance, but my grade school principle "adopted" us.

When I was a teenager my mom married a millionaire.

Religion or non-religion has nothing to do with how charitable someone is.

When you have nothing, everything is about life, real life. Not only your own, but everyone else's as well.

When you have money, and start accumulating "stuff" ---- life becomes about keeping your stuff.

It's really pretty much that simple.


Charity - is dependent on the act of giving something to someone else that means something to you. Not giving something you won't miss.

And this is the point, when I give a rescue mission $20 I conciously choose to go without something of that value so that I can, a millionaire and drop $10K on that same mission and not give up a thing.

Charity - is actually giving of 'yourself' not your money.


Charity is far broader then that. Have you been at the receiving end of charity?

I don't have to choose to go without to offer free babysitting to a mom who needs a break or has a doctor appointment.

I don't support blaming those who have money because I dont.



Please read the entire post before responding.

Did you read the last line of my post where I clearly state ".... Charity - is actually giving of 'yourself'....?

Didn't think so.

And yes, I've been on the receiving end of charity.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

Did you read the last line of my post where I clearly state ".... Charity - is actually giving of 'yourself'....?



Yes I did.

Why'd you stick it at the end like an after thought?



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope


The notion that one can believe or not believe in God is theistic in origin, and it is not only dubious, but also dangerous. It gives fuel to theistic fire, and leads to the myth of the unbeliever, the infidel and atheist in theistic nomenclature. To be proud to wear these purely theistic notions is ironic to say the least.


then let irony ring. it will make the sting all the more satisfying when their condescending labels outlast them.


It is begging the question to assume that there is a God, or in your words, “something”, to not believe in, when there is no such something.


but theism does exist. it is not "god" being "not believed in", it is theism. theism as an economic, social and political device.


Every time someone asserts they do not believe in God or deities, they are attributing it with some sense of being by doing so, and are left to argue within theistic contexts.


no more so than a psychiatrist explaining to a schizophrenic that their hallucinatory companions are not real.


It is simply untrue that one doesn’t believe in gods or deities; one either believes or not believes in certain stories, arguments and promises. Unless you wish to claim these stories, arguments and promises should be named “God”, atheists will be discussing the nature of something that has no nature.


to an extent, i agree. the contradictory messages spread by the spectrum of christian shades tend to leave an overall murky understanding of god except that he is exactly whatever you need him to be at any given moment. the source of this understanding, however, is not a supernatural entity. it is a demographic. and i believe that it is the psychology of that demographic being debated. it is the nature of theistic psychology being discussed, because something that doesnt exist cant be effectively discussed. only the minds perceiving its existence can be discussed. and that is what i see a lot of around here.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 04:56 PM
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originally posted by: AnneeYes I did.

Why'd you stick it at the end like an after thought?


Simply because it followed from what I was addressing - the topic of this thread.



posted on Jan, 12 2015 @ 06:19 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm


then let irony ring. it will make the sting all the more satisfying when their condescending labels outlast them.


If irony is the the method, then I like your style. Personally, I would not allow a theist the satisfaction of seeing me as an atheist, nor would I utilize their nomenclature to speak about the world, but admittedly, such an endeavour is difficult in practice.


but theism does exist. it is not "god" being "not believed in", it is theism. theism as an economic, social and political device.


Now we are speaking of things that exist. This is honesty. Note, however, that we do not need the concept God, nor its negation, to describe this angle and point of view.


to an extent, i agree. the contradictory messages spread by the spectrum of christian shades tend to leave an overall murky understanding of god except that he is exactly whatever you need him to be at any given moment. the source of this understanding, however, is not a supernatural entity. it is a demographic. and i believe that it is the psychology of that demographic being debated. it is the nature of theistic psychology being discussed, because something that doesnt exist cant be effectively discussed. only the minds perceiving its existence can be discussed. and that is what i see a lot of around here.


Well said, good sir. I hope that what you say is true.



posted on Jan, 13 2015 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope


Personally, I would not allow a theist the satisfaction of seeing me as an atheist, nor would I utilize their nomenclature to speak about the world, but admittedly, such an endeavour is difficult in practice.


language has become, like so much else, largely an ambiguous medium easily available to be transplanted and repurposed given the right cultural wind. thats not something i can afford to let myself be bothered by. not to mention that the world is a cruel place for a personality of such trivial peeves.

just as no one spiritual group owns the word "theist" or "theism" or "theology", no one owns the words "atheist" or "atheism"


Now we are speaking of things that exist. This is honesty. Note, however, that we do not need the concept God, nor its negation, to describe this angle and point of view.


do you expect members to simply ignore the use of god as justification for morally questionable philosophies or practices? to act like any sentence supporting the existence of a god is just a blank space on the screen?



posted on Jan, 13 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: TzarChasm


do you expect members to simply ignore the use of god as justification for morally questionable philosophies or practices? to act like any sentence supporting the existence of a god is just a blank space on the screen?


Not at all. I expect people to do the exact opposite, as yourself and most others show.

Pride in one’s chosen denomination or classification is quite common. I’m not quite sure, but I believe I may be the only one who thinks this sort of superstition.



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