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Curiosity: Potential Anomalies (2015)

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posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 06:43 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
good point Aleister, dont want Mr Shift moaning im mucking up the thread ... where is he btw?

Looking at rocks for signs of the structured remains of living organisms. Pretty slim pickings lately. Nary a spiral or spoked shape to be seen.

I imagine that any living creatures would be conflicted as to where they would want to live. On one hand, water is assumed to be essential. On the other hand, it's going to be colder than the ground, and will block very important warm sunshine. It's going to need to hang right at the edge of the water. If they can find any volcanic hot springs, all the better, but they might not be easy to find. One of the next probes they send up would do well to see if it can find some old hot springs.




posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 06:57 PM
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a reply to: Blue Shift

how about that one from a few pages back , on CharLee's picture of the ring thing , looks akin of at least the same family as *insertnamehereinfinityshapedthing*



environment dictates much i guess , especially for crustacians and the like , corals etc
as for hot springs , what would be left of them on the surface now, thats even if we assume this surface hasnt been created within the last 10,000 years via repeated climatic attrition/deposition

what would/could they look like ?

funbox



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 07:21 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP



Because of what you call "your odd sence of humour" I understand half or less of what you write, and I'm tired of making an effort to try to understand what you mean. I have better things to do with my time.


i understand what you mean , but your getting better at understanding half of what you dont understand , dont forget we come from very different cultural backgrounds so there will be gaps in understanding ,and very much so in humour, maybe not as much as the german sence of humour though
im an ignorant fool when it comes to portuguese , so have a chuckle at that


you do well or at least t'gaat

funbox



posted on Jul, 6 2015 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift

originally posted by: funbox
good point Aleister, dont want Mr Shift moaning im mucking up the thread ... where is he btw?

Looking at rocks for signs of the structured remains of living organisms. Pretty slim pickings lately. Nary a spiral or spoked shape to be seen.

I imagine that any living creatures would be conflicted as to where they would want to live. On one hand, water is assumed to be essential. On the other hand, it's going to be colder than the ground, and will block very important warm sunshine. It's going to need to hang right at the edge of the water. If they can find any volcanic hot springs, all the better, but they might not be easy to find. One of the next probes they send up would do well to see if it can find some old hot springs.


How puzzling that life may be on a comet under such more harsh conditions I would think then mars.



The observed features "are all consistent with a mixture of ice and organic material that consolidate under the Sun's warming during the comet's orbiting in space, when active micro-organisms can be supported," said the statement.

news.yahoo.com...



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee
How puzzling that life may be on a comet under such more harsh conditions I would think then mars.

Well, we all know that organic chemicals and water and warmth do not guarantee life. You can shake a wet bag of warm, complete DNA strands for a billion years and it ain't necessarily going to start swimming around looking for food and a mate.

The biggest argument against there being or ever having been life on Mars is that it's not easy to find. If we know anything about life, it's pernicious. Look at the extremophiles. Give life a tiny chance and it will crawl into every available nook and cranny. Land practically anywhere on Earth except for active volcanoes and you'll find life or some evidence of it in ten minutes. This planet is filthy with it. Mars? Not so much.

Yeah, maybe a couple billion years of weathering has washed it away. But Mars isn't as geologically active as Earth. Seems like even after all this time, it would be easier to find if it was ever there at all.



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: Blue Shift




This planet is filthy with it. Mars? Not so much.


We will see.



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: Blue Shift
The biggest argument against there being or ever having been life on Mars is that it's not easy to find. If we know anything about life, it's pernicious. Look at the extremophiles. Give life a tiny chance and it will crawl into every available nook and cranny. Land practically anywhere on Earth except for active volcanoes and you'll find life or some evidence of it in ten minutes. This planet is filthy with it. Mars? Not so much.


I wouldn't give up hope, though ... there's still a lot to explore and we're still only scratching the surface! I just came across this interesting article on space.com:

Is Mars Humid Enough to Support Life?

The article states that scientists are still open to the possibility of even extant life on Mars. It takes into account radiation levels, atmospheric pressure, temperatures and nearly everything else we know about martian climate today. The example of terrestial lichens surviving under simulated Mars conditions (although without replicating) is quite impressive.

Just thought I'd share this here ... before we declare Mars a dead planet way too early! ;-)



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

would this explain then the drop of in data set regarding windspeed and humidity ? seems like they got cold feet around sol 200


i thought you'd actually done one to mars to have a nose

but then as MrsShift so rightly points out there's been a bit of a lul

funbox



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: funbox

I guess that could explain many things, for example why extant life is so difficult to detect! On the other hand: even past life is difficult to detect as we have seen many times.

I'm still waiting for that close-up of an ammonite fossil imprint on a martian rock (or something similar). It would be visual evidence only ... but really hard to dispute (although we already came pretty close with those crinoid-like features, and the holdfasts etc.).

Let's see what that hermatite ridge brings further up that slope!



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 04:00 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

Where is the machine now, in terms of the slope of Mount Sharpe? Did it cross the major sandpit obstacles? I haven't seen a map in months, so thanks to anyone who can set me on the right course.



posted on Jul, 7 2015 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

Hi there, Aleister ... this one should be pretty recent:
mars.jpl.nasa.gov...

Doesn't look as though the dangerzone has been crossed yet, a few more sols to go I guess. By the way: that geological formation I was referring to (hermatite ridge) is even further away and can't be seen on that map, it should be somewhere to the south, center'ish.

Will take ages to get there!



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 06:31 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

could be waiting a long time , haven't we been waiting well over a year now to see the inside's of flippy ? those close up colour shots we were expecting



I take it that they decided against it , or did we miss something ?

funbox



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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something in the sand

looks like some sort of Serpent staff head to me


sol 1032 left nav



funbox



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 01:54 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

So the Rover is very late in crossing the sandtraps (the Old Course at St. Aoonn;vr3npd on Mars) and starting the slopes of the Mount proper. Wonder what the hold up is, do they think that the Rover won't make it across and are just wandering around on the other side, where they came from?



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

hope its soon , as im keenly interested in seeing the foothills that seems to be almost completely obliterated by sand, the storms are doing/have been doing this for a long time now , are they so relentless through all the seasons of the year ?


mars.nasa.gov...


the batch that's come in through on the nav cams, are perfect example's ..Ive been taking them into Photoshop and doing some extreme level balancing ,hmmm , I swear I can see a Dome or two behind the noise

ill not example them though

funbox



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: funbox

I hope they get there before Curiosity stops working.

Regarding the wind and humidity measurements, I sent an email to one of the scientists, asking about the lack of data on that site, and today I got this answer (translated by me from Spanish):


The humidity data is not on the CAB page because of a computer problem we hope to solve soon. As for the PDS, the other site you mention, we have the humidity data and from the next delivery that will happen in a few days we will include the wind data.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

most certainly a quazi exsistance , nice axestoke ArMaP


may i ask who you sent this email to? a N.A.S.A scientist >?

funbox


edit on 8-7-2015 by funbox because: hk,hk,lk,lk



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: funbox

As the REMS was made by Centre for Astrobiology in Madrid, Spain and the Finnish Meteorological Institut I sent the email to the REMS team leader, Javier Gómez-Elvira.



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

did he mention the problems with the humdity data ? do these lie at the source ?

i think they wanted to study the humidity data in house, so to speak ,maybe they thought that , *and given the unusual spike between sol 1-200, it was pertinent to keep close to the chest , for the time being.

in light of the recent announcements regarding humidty and potential life on mars , source from NASA ?

funbox



posted on Jul, 8 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: funbox
did he mention the problems with the humdity data ? do these lie at the source ?

No, he only said what I posted.


in light of the recent announcements regarding humidty and potential life on mars , source from NASA ?

What recent announcements?



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