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Solar System Set For Eventual Collision With Stellar Orange Dwarf

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posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: ressiv
my interrest is now wat stars has passed us in the past...and wat effects it had then....
surely they can calculate that events?
yes. that info is available with a adept enough web search. for example barnard's star is about 6 ly away right now but is approaching and will get closer than alpha proxima is now.

www.solstation.com...


In fact, Barnard's Star is approaching Sol rapidly at 140 kilometers per second (87 miles/second) and will get as close as 3.8 light-years (ly) around 11,800 CE.


i remember reading about several others:


Among the known stars, Proxima Centauri has been the closest star to the Sun for about 32,000 years and will be so for about another 33,000 years, after which the closest star to the Sun will be Ross 248.[55] In 2001, J. García-Sánchez et al. predicted that Proxima will make its closest approach to the Sun, coming within 3.11 light years of the latter, in approximately 26,700 years.[2] A 2010 study by V. V. Bobylev predicted a closest approach distance of 2.90 ly in about 27,400 years.[56]



The space velocity components of this star in the galactic coordinate system are [U, V, W] = [–32.9 ± 0.7, –74.3 ± 1.3, 0.0 ± 1.4] km/s.[11] The trajectory of Ross 248 will bring it closer to the Solar System in the future. In 1993 Matthews suggested that in about 33,000 years Ross 248 would be the closest star to the Sun, approaching within a minimum distance of 3.024 light-years (0.927 parsecs) in 36,000 years.[19]



Gliese 710 is currently about 63.8 light-years (19.6 parsecs) from Earth, but its proper motion, distance, and radial velocity[39] indicate that it will approach within a very small distance—perhaps under one light year—from the Sun within 1.4 million years, based on past and current Hipparcos data.[40]


now i have read articles that interpolate backwards instead of looking at where the stars will be in the future. there may be some software that can do that. maybe celestia does? i dunno. but if it does celestia is both free and very very very cool.

i'll see if i can find a stellar proper motion interpolation article.
edit on 5-1-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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Addendum: I found some data of past locations of stars. it's atthe very bottom of this article in table form so i cannot post a exerpt:

en.wikipedia.org...

en.wikipedia.org...

as close as .35 LY about 3.8 million years ago

en.wikipedia.org...

as close as 4.16 ly away about 8.61 million years ago

en.wikipedia.org...

as close as 5.01 light years about 5 million years ago

and this is not comprehensive by any means. it's just what i could find in ten minutes of searching.
edit on 5-1-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: i knew i was right the first time.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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found another:

www.centauri-dreams.org...


Some encounters are recent: Tiny Van Maanen’s star, a white dwarf, passed near our Sun as recently as 15,000 years ago.


we got buzzed by a white dwarf in human history!



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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www.mpia.de...

while trying to find out just how close that white dwarf got i found this:

www.mpia.de...

with links to a paper paper archive and a faq about the paper at:

www.mpia.de...

and the paper itself: www.mpia.de...




edit on 5-1-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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Thanks for all these posts, stormbringer.

With an orange dwarf passing, say, 0.5 light year from the Sun, I wonder what its gravitational influence would be on our planets. Any maths buffs wanna post the calculations please? Also, how bright would it look from Earth?



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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But.. but...but they told me that the universe will keep exspanding so that earth is so far away from any other stars that we won't even be able to see them.

yeah and big bang is BS too if you think they can look back 13bn years and see something 0.000000000000000000001 m/s after something as small as a pin head explodes when no one can even tell you if you should be looking
North or West to view this none event.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Thanks for all these posts, stormbringer.

With an orange dwarf passing, say, 0.5 light year from the Sun, I wonder what its gravitational influence would be on our planets. Any maths buffs wanna post the calculations please? Also, how bright would it look from Earth?
it would have to get closer than that to cause any planetary migration. we're safe from that unless they got the distance wrong. i seem to recall multi-star star systems with planets that are about that separation. in fact alpha centauri, alpha centaur b are withing .1 something light years of each other and proxima centauri is about that close to alpha centauri a.

mind you; it does put limits on where planets could have formed (free stable orbits) in those systems. but disrupting planet formation is a bit different from lobbing a fully formed planet out into the void. normally it takes a really close pass or inwardly migrating gas giants to do that.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: VirusGuard
But.. but...but they told me that the universe will keep exspanding so that earth is so far away from any other stars that we won't even be able to see them.

yeah and big bang is BS too if you think they can look back 13bn years and see something 0.000000000000000000001 m/s after something as small as a pin head explodes when no one can even tell you if you should be looking
North or West to view this none event.


it's called interpolation. you don't have to see it to know it happened. On average all galaxies are getting farther and farther apart. Going back in time logically they were closer and closer together. and we know their current speeds away from each other to the hubble limit. so we can deduce the amount of time in the past when they would have been extremely close together or even a singularity. on top of that there are other threads of evidence such as the cosmic background radiation which is best explained by an explosion. and then there is the standard model and evidence from collider labs.

There simply is no better explanation for what we observe and know. the theory does not conflict with the bible as written in the original languages either. So even the religious can and should accept it. God does not require us to reject valid evidence.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: VirusGuard
But.. but...but they told me that the universe will keep exspanding so that earth is so far away from any other stars that we won't even be able to see them.

yeah and big bang is BS too if you think they can look back 13bn years and see something 0.000000000000000000001 m/s after something as small as a pin head explodes when no one can even tell you if you should be looking
North or West to view this none event.


You do realize that of the 20 or so nearest stars only three are heading our way. as far as galaxies go those that are blue shifted are even rarer than blue shifted planets. perturbations and collisions will send a few strays closer together. that does not invalidate the fact that very nearly every thing else is not only moving away but doing so at an ever increasing pace.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 12:04 PM
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originally posted by: HumansEh
When we as a species realise how insignificant the brief existence of our solar system is in the vastness of the universe we shall be kinder to each other for no other reason than we accept our insignifigance. Sadly we are not so advanced.



Sadly, that just means we're trapped here forever with people who don't want to be kind.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: VirusGuard
But.. but...but they told me that the universe will keep exspanding so that earth is so far away from any other stars that we won't even be able to see them.

yeah and big bang is BS too if you think they can look back 13bn years and see something 0.000000000000000000001 m/s after something as small as a pin head explodes when no one can even tell you if you should be looking
North or West to view this none event.




The Earth will be long gone by the time that happens, when the Sun expands into a red giant and consumes us.

They can't see the beginning of the Big Bang. We can only go back visually and with radio astronomy, at about 380,000 years after the Big Bang.
Prior to that, the universe is too hot and not transparent to light. What happened prior to that has been theorized with math and models.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 12:17 PM
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unless we use the intervening cosmic scale time to invent a fuel mixer for the sun or develop interstellar travel or the means to move earth to the outer solar system. any of which could happen.



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 03:42 AM
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originally posted by: stormbringer1701
for the record Sol is an orange dwarf too. so... Aliens!



Sol is a G-class YELLOW Dwarf.

HIP 85605 is a K-class ORANGE Dwarf.

Here you go:





posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 04:03 AM
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According to Michiu Kaku, we should be a type 3 civilization by then.... We could put it into a new orbit and keep it around as an emergency power source.



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: stormbringer1701
for the record Sol is an orange dwarf too. so... Aliens!


Also if something goes through the Oort Cloud that means lots of Oort cloud objects will get launched in our general direction. not all fun and games...


Sol is slightly larger than average suns, which is why it has lasted so long...



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 10:05 AM
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originally posted by: pikestaff

originally posted by: stormbringer1701
for the record Sol is an orange dwarf too. so... Aliens!


Also if something goes through the Oort Cloud that means lots of Oort cloud objects will get launched in our general direction. not all fun and games...


Sol is slightly larger than average suns, which is why it has lasted so long...


not exactly. the smallest stars last nearly forever. the larger ones get a fuel pump problem and go to the recycle bin before they use up 97 percent of the hydrogen fuel they actually have. if larger stars had the same fuel mixing as red dwarfs they would last until the end of time instead of a paltry 8 billion years or so.



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 10:05 AM
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double post. please delete.

edit on 7-1-2015 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: stormbringer1701
for the record Sol is an orange dwarf too. so... Aliens!



Sol is a G-class YELLOW Dwarf.

HIP 85605 is a K-class ORANGE Dwarf.

Here you go:




Oh hey! i got another silly question...

firstly; has there been a detailed study of binaries containing a large star and a white dwarf like Procyon and Sirius? and secondly were there any unusual spectral lines in those systems? it's a question about unusual matter that might theoretically be created both according to obscure but non fringe science and also from ufo fringe lore.

A certain well worn UFO related (probable) kook claims that such systems can produce stable isotopes of otherwise fleeting trans-uranic super heavy elements. And mainstream science also says weird matter synthesis can occur in such systems but mainly in super rare cases where a red or blue giant star envelops/contains/merged with a white dwarf.

i would guess that any such matter would have unique spectral signatures.



posted on Jan, 8 2015 @ 04:55 AM
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The lifespan of a star is essentially determined by its mass. The more massive the star, the shorter the lifespan....

www.universetoday.com...



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