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New Hoard of over 5,000 Ancient Coins Found in Britain , c11th Century.

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posted on Jan, 2 2015 @ 08:03 PM
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I have a really hard time believing a lead bucket buried two feet below ground over a thousand years ago would remain intact, much less the metal contents inside would remain in mint-like condition.

Planted for evidence. Greenland Theory - Apocalypse Now was released on December 21, 2014, the same date the coins were supposedly 'discovered'.




posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 04:09 AM
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a reply to: hurdygurdy




I have a really hard time believing a lead bucket buried two feet below ground over a thousand years ago would remain intactt , much less the metal contents inside would remain in mint-like condition.

The lead bucket didn't survive.

Mr Coleman had seen some fragments of lead, picked off the top one and saw the "layers of coins"


There are many examples of well preserved metalwork dating back far earlier than these coins.

The Gundestrup Cauldron , 1st or 2nd century BC.
www.abovetopsecret.com...

The incredible Sevso Roman Treasure.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



was released on December 21, 2014, the same date the coins were supposedly 'discovered'

Supposedly discovered ?



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 04:43 AM
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a reply to: hurdygurdy

Hehehehe! Picture a huge set of scales. On one side is the idea of 1300 years of human history has been made up and only your boy Taylor has noticed. Okay? Got it? now on the other side is the idea that someone hid their stash and got double-tapped by a sword and never came back.

Which side has more evidence? Dont forget that big finds happen every year around the world or are they 'planted for rvidence' too ?

@theOp, sweet! Ida kept a hold on to some coins for memories. $$ is $$ and the coins are forver.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: FalcoFan

Who said anything about the "Government coming in and stealing it"?

As buster2010 said, they get paid a fair market price after valuation by experts and this is done by the Museum buying it - sod all to with "the Government"...

All proceeds are split 50/50 between the finder and the landowner. If it happens to be your land you find it on, you get to keep all the money.

The law isn't there to "steal" treasure, but rather ensure that historical artefacts are not unearthed by people and whisked out the country to private collectors, rather than being kept in country for all to see and enjoy.
edit on 3/1/15 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 11:30 PM
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a reply to: stumason

Nice post about the rules of finding treasure in the UK.

Finds like this are so interesting to me.
If I lived in Europe metal-detecting would be my hobby for sure.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 11:32 PM
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a reply to: hurdygurdy

hurdygurdy,

One of the things that makes gold and silver valuable is that they don't rust or deteriorate over time.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 01:57 AM
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a reply to: steamiron

I like the romantic notion that the pirate never made it back to his stash but heavy things such as 25 lbs of metal encased in a lead box will sink in the ground while topsoil builds up over time. Two feet below ground just seems too shallow for something buried a thousand years ago.

I lived on a old farmstead and did a lot of metal detecting. The most exciting find was an ornate tractor engine buried about two feet below ground in heavy clay and extremely rocky soil. The engine was around 50-60 years old and I know the lazy dudes who used to live there never buried anything. The engine sank where it was dropped.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: hurdygurdy

Two feet below ground is quite deep, really. If you're in the right spot, 24 inches of digging will get you to layers where Roman (or even pre-Roman) artefacts and even ruins are dug up. Just watching an episode of Time Team will show that when the dig their trenches, they're rarely more than 2 or 3 feet deep and can show up several layers of archaeology. Here are some video's from an episode where they uncovered a Roman villa. As you can see from the video "Cassie's Trench 2 Update", the trench they have dug is barely a foot deep and they have Roman ruins.



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