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CyberWars: Want To Give The NSA Excedrin Headache #23??? Here Is How!

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posted on Jan, 2 2015 @ 09:33 AM
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a reply to: Bybyots




How about just everyone be who they say they are backed by vetted credentials and all of us using a federated logon system for the WWW? 

Suddenly no war or need for the 'arsenal' that you posted. 



So basically its the cyber version of "can I see your papers please".




posted on Jan, 2 2015 @ 02:22 PM
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a reply to: hillbilly4rent



So basically it’s the cyber version of "can I see your papers please".


We are all now patrons of one another's "papers".

When you log on to some service on the WWW, you have the very reasonable expectation that said service will be who they say they are, just as said service anticipates that you are who you say you are.

The systems that we are talking about were designed to be networked based upon this mutual-trust model.

The systems, whether designed for fun or for profit (or for both), are based on a model of transparency, not anonymity.

So, in the sense that you used the meme “papers please(!)”, no, not one-sided like that.

Here is that MIT Kerberos link again, only this time it's in slide format. Check it out, if you so desire.

kit.mit.edu...




posted on Jan, 2 2015 @ 03:54 PM
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I think a lot of what they SAY they can do is BS.
Want some proof?
Drug dealers use phones, yet they are most often caught because of informants.
If THEY monitor every call/text then how come our streets are littered with phone weilding drug dealers? Surely they should have caught them all by now?! But they havent, therefore either they are lying about their ability to monitor us, or they are involved in drug dealing, it must be one or the other!



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: Bybyots
a reply to: Hefficide



Make no mistake, there is war, and this information is your gun rack in that battle.


How about just everyone be who they say they are backed by vetted credentials and all of us using a federated logon system for the WWW?

Suddenly no war or need for the 'arsenal' that you posted.



Federated Identity

MIT Consortium for Kerberos and Internet Trust


NO...

There would be no need for war or the arsenal Heff posted about if the
government followed the constitution and quit spying on its citizen's
personal communications.

The SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND dictates our right to privacy, our right
to be free from the harassment of searches without REASON--articulable
probable cause that can be presented to a judge who can then make the
decision as to whether a citizen should have this right denied based on
EVIDENCE.




edit on 3-1-2015 by rival because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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None of that stuff works, because all roads lead to Rome.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 11:08 AM
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a reply to: rival



The SUPREME LAW OF THE LAND dictates our right to privacy, our right to be free from the harassment of searches without REASON--articulable probable cause that can be presented to a judge who can then make the decision as to whether a citizen should have this right denied based on EVIDENCE.


Well that's awesome, as long as you are on "the land"...

But while you are on networks owned by other people?

You better find some way to get control of your PII and SPI.



NO...


Sorry, but "YEAH", Kerberos comes native in just about any operating system that you can imagine and waits there ready to be used since Gramma Moses.

But folks just "wanted it to work" and ran off and worked it, I suppose hoping that someone else would come along and "articulate" these problems and why they are bad and then, I guess, fix them for you all?

That's why you love "Anonymous", many of you.

Take your own advice and "stock up on knowledge", like Heff is doing.

Some of you that are past about 58 or so aren't going to have to worry about this all, really, and you can just complain yourselves in to retirement.

The rest of us actually have to work and live with these systems and we would like them to work properly.


edit on 3-1-2015 by Bybyots because: . : .



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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a reply to: sean



None of that stuff works, because all roads lead to Rome.


Winner Winner, Chicken Dinner!

"The Empire Never Ended", so "when in Rome", as they say.




posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 11:20 AM
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I use TAILS OS alot.

Great thing about that as all data unless you allow otherwise is stored on the RAM not hard drive. So once you turn the Laptop off POOF all data is gone.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: Hefficide

Interesting stuff, however that VPN list has HideMyAss VPN listed as #2 and recommended. Do your own research. HideMyAss VPN actually logs. Ideally, if you are going to go the VPN route you want one that does not log.

The VPN article/list gives a Torrent Freak VPN anonymity list, keep in mind that the Torrent Freak article is about 3 years out of date. (This is the TorrentFreak article)

We need to find updated information on VPN procedures to provide ATS users interested in this stuff with more updated content.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 04:07 PM
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ISP pratice deep packet inspections (willingly or not i don't know); the point being that if they find you use Tor or similar services you're a "person of interest" which you don't want to be.You can't trust this NSA report imo they're expert in lies.
Same applies for encryption why encrypt if you're clean -> person of interest.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 10:40 PM
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The thing to do is come up with our own new language. That cannot be deciphered.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 07:21 AM
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a reply to: Planclength

I think the issue there is the Government have access to best cryptographer's. You would need to create a always evolving and changing system. And then you still can't guarantee you'll never get found out.

Remember the German Enigma machine. They thought it was unbreakable.

The best way to stay under the radar is ignore TOR, VPN's and encrypted systems. Its simple don't use a PC, phone, smart devices or banks.

Shun modern life for the ability to be invisible...... And your family... Today that is impossible. Like it or hate it Big Brother is here to stay and by using these hidden tools to access the interweb is fine until they to get unlocked. Or become against the law to use.


Damned if you don't, Dammed if you do [qoute]


edit on 4/1/15 by Phatdamage because: spelling



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 07:25 AM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

Drug dealers tend to use prepaid throwaway phones and recycle them often. They also make sure their clientel doesn't discuss specifics over the phone, just a basic "Hey, you got that thing I needed"?

If stronger points need to be made, code words are used.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 01:17 PM
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Messing with the NSA is a bad idea. They are the most advanced spy agency on the planet. I'm not worried about them reading my facebook movie reviews personal opinions or if I look at porn online. I'm sure they could care less. But if I were talking about killing innocent people with a suicide bomb yeah I would hope they take notice of me real soon. Which they would that's what their system is for. Go NSA!
edit on 31America/Chicagoxpm3715America/Chicago3102 by texasyeti because: errors



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 01:24 PM
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originally posted by: texasyeti
Messing with the NSA is a bad idea. They are the most advanced spy agency on the planet. I'm not worried about them reading my facebook movie reviews personal opinions or if I look at orgy porn I surf online. I'm sure they could care less. But if I were talking about killing innocent people with a suicide bomb yeah I would hope they take notice of me real soon. Which they would that's what their system is for. Go NSA!


So... you're willing to overlook the shredding of the Fourth Amendment, and applaud it, because somebody, somewhere might do something bad and it's best to have the NSA on the lookout???

Funny - I have yet to see a case where the violation of Constitutional rights, or the Geneva Conventions for that matter, has been heralded as stopping anything, other than a handful of vague statements from politicians assuring us that things have, indeed, been stopped - though they cannot be specific about it.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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Everyone should use TOR although sadly it isn't immune to the prying eyes of the NSA/GCHQ and TOR themselves have warned their network was compromised last year.
blog.torproject.org...

Have you heard of Detekt? A tool created in conjunction with Amnesty International which scans your computer for evidence of NSA/GCHQ malware. Basically it can tell you if you have been a victim of government spying. If you have it is recommended you don't use that computer any more. I personally have written to GCHQ and the FOI to request details of their activity on me. It's not impossible just takes time. We can stand up to them. Good luck.

Link for Detekt -

resistsurveillance.org...



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 02:19 PM
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I wouldn't mind if the NSA started figuring out which dudes were peeing on toilet seats and murdering them.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: rupertg

The answer is every living male on the planet...



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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originally posted by: texasyeti
Messing with the NSA is a bad idea. They are the most advanced spy agency on the planet. I'm not worried about them reading my facebook movie reviews personal opinions or if I look at porn online. I'm sure they could care less. But if I were talking about killing innocent people with a suicide bomb yeah I would hope they take notice of me real soon. Which they would that's what their system is for. Go NSA!


Why didn't they catch the 9/11 hijackers? (heh)
How about the Tsarnaev brothers? (heh)

...I think we could add to the list of people that did dubious things and posted suspicious items online WELL before they did it. If memory serves Adam Lanza was strangely vocal online before Sandy Hook. (Hint: NSA spying isn't about catching terrorists.)

They really monitor your TO and FROM locations. VPN is better used if you can set it at a physical location (router) inside your home to route all your network traffic through it.

TOR is definitely something to stay away from. I know someone that does military network intelligence and he uses a VPN. He's got security clearance, etc. He's even suggested using a VPN. If you are going to TOR you better use a VPN. Personally, I'd recommend against using TOR and this is based on my friend's recommendation too.

If you really feel as though you have to hide what you are doing then you might want to run double VPN.

edit on 4-1-2015 by WCmutant because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 06:30 PM
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originally posted by: Bybyots
a reply to: hillbilly4rent



So basically it’s the cyber version of "can I see your papers please".


We are all now patrons of one another's "papers".

When you log on to some service on the WWW, you have the very reasonable expectation that said service will be who they say they are, just as said service anticipates that you are who you say you are.

The systems that we are talking about were designed to be networked based upon this mutual-trust model.

The systems, whether designed for fun or for profit (or for both), are based on a model of transparency, not anonymity.

So, in the sense that you used the meme “papers please(!)”, no, not one-sided like that.

Here is that MIT Kerberos link again, only this time it's in slide format. Check it out, if you so desire.

kit.mit.edu...



Ah! So anonymity just involved the construction of alternate, throwaway identities.

That's not a new concept to some - it even existed long before the cyber age.

No way would I ever let my real identity loose in some of the valleys I've walked - cyber space or not.

These programs are simply efforts to pin down the individual to a specific identity, and that plays right into the surveillance government's hands. It's much harder to track and correlate the tracks of someone who just vanishes like a puff of smoke, cyber smoke or not.

I'm pretty sure someone who "needs" to correlate my phone account with my e-mail account with my ATS account with my property tax records with my credit card access location records with my... on and on and on... is NOT what I would describe as a "friend just watching over me".




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