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Georgia police chief calls 911 to report he accidentally shot his wife — twice

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posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:15 PM
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www.rawstory.com...




A G eorgia police chief called 911 early New Year’s Day to report that he accidentally shot his wife twice with his service weapon.

Officers were called to the home of Peachtree Police Chief William McCollum about 4:15 a.m.

Police have not said what happened in the moments prior to the shooting.


Margaret McCollum, 58, remains in critical condition, authorities said.

The chief was placed on administrative leave during the investigation, which was turned over to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation.


"Placed on Administrative leave" not arrested, not booked....This double standard and preferential treatment needs to end if Law enforcement wants their respect back.




posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:17 PM
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Well, lets hope the wife pulls through.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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Saves money on divorce costs ..



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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Could it be a case of mistaken identity? She was returning home to surprise him and he was wary after a long day on the job and thought she was an intruder?
Just thinking out loud.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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And that they have a guard by her door 24/7 and he is not allowed at the hospital and under surveillance at all times.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Placed on leave pending an investigation. Doesn't mean he won't be arrested or charged, it means they're investigating the incident.

If and when he isn't arrested or charged, your complaint will be more valid.

There's a press conference at 2 which will hopefully shed some more light on things. GBI is investigating and hopefully they do a good job with it. I'm frankly not sure how one can accidentally shoot somebody twice, unless his wife was coming home late at night and he thought she was an intruder (and if there's a coverup, I'm sure the story will be that or something close to it)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Nothing a few more accidents wouldn't fix, I'm sure.

He would have finished her off then and there, but pity stayed his hand. "It's a pity I've run out of bullets", he thought as he ran back up the tunnel...



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:30 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Go ahead and choose the police state for a life partner. Enjoy the privilege built on the destruction of human liberty.
Feels good right?

Think before you act. Shocking domestic violence rates in families with LEO's
edit on 1-1-2015 by InverseLookingGlass because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:34 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6


Placed on leave pending an investigation. Doesn't mean he won't be arrested or charged, it means they're investigating the incident.


Is that the usual protocol?


Wouldn't he at least be arrested & bailed pending an investigation rather than free to go until further notice?



Or is it all done depending on the State?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6


Placed on leave pending an investigation. Doesn't mean he won't be arrested or charged, it means they're investigating the incident.


Would they have put a civilian on administrative leave or arrested him?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:40 PM
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Hows the saying go?

Once is an accident, twice is intentional and three times, a conspiracy.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:40 PM
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Damn those hair triggers.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: CagliostroTheGreat

Does the civilian work for the department? If not, then how would they put him on leave?

They would have questioned him and investigated the shooting. Just as the man in Ohio was not immediately placed under arrest, but may still be arrested if the investigation determines that charges are merited, the same applies here. Being put on administrative leave takes the officer out of the agency for the duration of the investigation. It means he can't go ask investigators how it's going. He can't issue orders to anybody.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

You're supposed to have probable cause to arrest somebody. Kind of hard to arrest somebody, charge them, and then set bail for them when you don't know what you're going to charge them with, if anything.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: CharlieSpeirs
a reply to: Shamrock6
Wouldn't he at least be arrested & bailed pending an investigation rather than free to go until further notice?


Nah. If it gets down to it, he'll sprinkle some crack in her closet and claim it was an arrest. IA will produce someone who was at the scene and saw her point something at him, and declare it to have been in keeping with policy. Then the DA will nol pros.

If they have to, they'll just extend the investigation a few times until the news quits following it. Tout fini.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:47 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: olaru12

Placed on leave pending an investigation. Doesn't mean he won't be arrested or charged, it means they're investigating the incident.

If and when he isn't arrested or charged, your complaint will be more valid.



My complaint is with the preferential treatment and double standard! Would an ordinary citizen have been treated the same way. You damn well know, they would have been arrested and jailed then investigated.

If shooting your wife twice isn't probable cause...how about discharging a firearm in town.


edit on 1-1-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

Nice juke!

Would the civilian have been allowed to remain at the scene or be booked and arrested immediately, honest answer, please, officer.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

You're supposed to have probable cause to arrest somebody. Kind of hard to arrest somebody, charge them, and then set bail for them when you don't know what you're going to charge them with, if anything.


Well, pretty sure if I shot my wife twice, they'd lead off with criminal negligence to keep me in the slam until they sorted it out. Hell, you GOT him on discharging his weapon in the city, at least, if not aggravated battery.

eta: What do you guys think the odds are that they'll come up with claiming the guy thought someone was breaking into his house to kill him because he's a cop, and that this sad heartwrenching event is all the fault of evil anti-police criticizers whose hands are LITERALLY DRIPPING with blood (as per Pat Lynch)? Personally, I expect to see "look what you made me do" dusted over pretty much any questionable action for a while.
edit on 1-1-2015 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:57 PM
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originally posted by: CagliostroTheGreat
a reply to: Shamrock6

Nice juke!

Would the civilian have been allowed to remain at the scene .

I would doubt anyone being left like that, for some strange reason
most police are suspicious when someone is shot twice...maybe this police chief has a nice face though!



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 01:02 PM
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a reply to: CagliostroTheGreat

No juke required. You asked an absurd question and received a response in kind.

Did you see a different article than I did? Where did it say he was allowed to remain at the scene? Where did it say he was permitted to stay there? For all you know he was taken the a station and questioned, just the same as a civilian would have been unless probable cause presented itself for it.

My ex father in law died in my home. Police arrived with EMS. My ex wife and I were questioned as to the nature of his death. We weren't immediately arrested and charged with anything. And before you ask: no, I didn't identify myself as law enforcement at any point, nor was I living in the county I work for.




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