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Monarch Butterflies reign coming to an end.

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posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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It would seem that the Monarch Butterfly-a truly majestic and beautiful icon, is suffering a rapid and devestating decline in population.


After conservationists warned that the monarch butterfly's population is declining in a "deadly free fall," the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are reviewing a proposal to include it on the endangered species list, the federal agency announced this week.

link here


So far the monarch population has fallen an astounding 90% in the last 20 years. This is some of the saddest news I've read simply because the Monarch was a huge part of growing up for me and to think it may be gone in my lifetime...that my kids may never get to see them the way we did.

First the bees, now the butterflies. It's a shame what we're doing to this planet.
edit on 1-1-2015 by phoenix9884 because: mobile is making it difficult >


edit on 1-1-2015 by phoenix9884 because: mobile device...nuff said.




posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:40 AM
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a reply to: phoenix9884


Its hard for them to find milk weeds these days.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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They're so beautiful. This would be a great loss, one of the most lovely aspects of our gardens and nature. People should start to plant butterfly and hummingbird plants and gardens. I'm hoping the trumpet vines come up this spring, wind blew over my seeds in a small greenhouse planter last year, and most of them died. Will start early this year. And to me, this is a good project for science, use their advanced cloning and save the species.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: phoenix9884
Here is a good link to help them out in your own backyard!



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: Logarock
a reply to: phoenix9884


Its hard for them to find milk weeds these days.


Thank you! I was just looking for what plant it was. Gonna plant some in my back yard hopefully conserve what numbers I have here. Which isn't many and mostly the black kind (I've only seen 2 orange ones where I am, in the last 8 years)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: phoenix9884

No expert here but have noticed in rural area I grew up in milkweed used to grow everywhere even with the crops. They don't grow, nothing grows in the fields these days but crops. Did see a few years ago a bunch growing in part of the park that was allowed to go to brush. But yea its rare here to see the monarch around here these days.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 10:26 AM
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Here in the UK a lot of butterfly species have been seen less. Wild flower gardens are a good idea, and produce nice flowers for vases.

www.telegraph.co.uk...

higgledygarden.com...



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:09 AM
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I have about 20 milkweed plants growing at my business and have had them about ten years. I always had monarchs. Two years ago I had at least 100 larva, last year I had maybe a dozen. This is not uncommon for me, the numbers fluctuate every year. But this year i only found two larve and no butterflies. This is my worst year ever. I've never had two bad years in a row.
Something I did notice in the past are praying mantis on the milkweed. I would have big caterpillars one day and the next day they would be gone. The buggers were eating my monarchs! I went on a killing spree with these bugs and my butterflies flourished.
I don't like killing them but it was them or the butterflies. Funny thing, I didn't know anything ate monarchs but I guess I was wrong.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:44 AM
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The year is not even a day old yet, and damn sad news, cursed be 2015.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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First the monarchs, then polar bears, then the tigers.....

We are destroying the planet, mostly because our population is so out of proportion, but people still are pretending that 7 billion people have no effect on anything.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: CB328
First the monarchs, then polar bears, then the tigers.....

We are destroying the planet, mostly because our population is so out of proportion, but people still are pretending that 7 billion people have no effect on anything.



There are more extinct species than living species on this planet. Most of them died off long before humans walked the earth. Did we destroy them too?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: phoenix9884

First the bees, now the butterflies. It's a shame what we're doing to this planet.


Thanks you for bring this to ATS, but why do you feel it is all because of those nasty humans?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:03 PM
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Are you seriously denying that we are killing off species?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:09 PM
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Change is inevitable, whether it be by human hand or a really big rock from some other part of our solar system.

Life on earth will someday be reduced to microbes in the seas. Will they prosper? Will they begin a new cycle and replenish, populating this planet with a myriad of life forms once again? Who's to say?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: CB328

Nope.
We are killing our selves off.
And the planet will go along millions of years after we are gone just like the dinosaurs, and nobody will miss us.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:14 PM
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originally posted by: CB328

We are destroying the planet, mostly because our population is so out of proportion, but people still are pretending that 7 billion people have no effect on anything.


The problem is that humans live to damn long, so what do you suggest we do? It has nothing to do with popping too many babies out, so places like Europe, China, Japan and others are actually in population decline due to the lower birth rates. This is mostly caused by, in China's situation state restrictions, and for others, just the cost to raise a family.

These places will have a hard time in the near future as their population ages and they have many more post 65 than pre 65 who needs to do all the work.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
a reply to: CB328

Nope.
We are killing our selves off.
And the planet will go along millions of years after we are gone just like the dinosaurs, and nobody will miss us.




We are at 7 billion and live into the 80s so just how are we killing ourselves off?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: quercusrex
Change is inevitable, whether it be by human hand or a really big rock from some other part of our solar system.

Life on earth will someday be reduced to microbes in the seas. Will they prosper? Will they begin a new cycle and replenish, populating this planet with a myriad of life forms once again? Who's to say?



This has happened many time in our past. The most resent was 400 million years ago with snow ball earth. There really wasn't much left but micros during that time and some sea life, but as soon as the earth thawed life sprung back as dinosaurs and then mammal after the Golf of Mexico impact.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:24 PM
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originally posted by: Xtrozero

originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
a reply to: CB328

Nope.
We are killing our selves off.
And the planet will go along millions of years after we are gone just like the dinosaurs, and nobody will miss us.




We are at 7 billion and live into the 80s so just how are we killing ourselves off?



By poisoning our environment. Mercury, radiation, gmo's reliance on technology. One emp from the sun and half of that 7 billion will starve in a few months.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:46 PM
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a reply to: phoenix9884
Be cautious when using common names for plants. Make sure that the species of milkweed you are intending to plant is actually used by monarchs. There is a comprehensive list of plants used by both the larvae and the adult on Wikipedia here.

Also, to avoid anthropogenicly contributing to the Holocene extinction further, make sure that the species you are intending on planting are not invasive in your area or responsible for poisoning native fauna. I know, industry has been lying to you and nature is actually very complex. It sucks.

edit on 1-1-2015 by CraftBuilder because: I fixed the link.




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