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The Tribe In The Picture , Uncontacted Amazon Tribe Documentary

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posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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I remember when the pictures of this tribe were released a few years ago and how interesting I found looking at the images of these people that time had forgotten , living life as nature had intended and probably a more productive and fruitful life at that .... I envy their freedom.

Well today I happened upon this video of an expedition led by the man who took the pictures , José Carlos Morales , Morales is an expert on indigenous peoples and the founder of The Expert Mechanism on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples organisation , he also has first hand knowledge of the uncontacted tribe as they shot an arrow through his neck in a previous visit to their lands.

If you have an interest in these people and the dangers they face the video is here for you , it's an easy watch after the new year festivities.
For those of a sensitive disposition the video naturally contains a couple of scenes of nudity.

Due to the full frontal female nudity of the video thumbnail I won't post the embed and would be grateful if nobody else does either

www.youtube.com...

I found the video an interesting watch and a reminder of how removed we are from Real life , given a choice of being born into my "civilised" life or their life of tribal living I'd choose theirs.
I have nothing but respect for José Carlos Morales and his dedication and ethics toward these indigenous people , he sums it up perfectly at the end of the video.




posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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i think we should leave them alone
and where did they get those metal pans?
edit on 1-1-2015 by haven123 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: haven123

I agree.
The pans were acquired from raids on other settlements that are in contact with the outside world.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:15 AM
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Why should we leave them alone? I've never understood this perspective. It seems paternal, like these aren't fully functioning humans capable of making their own decisions when it comes to contact with other groups of humans.

I say, give them the choice of joining the rest of the world, and if when presented with knowledge of the rest of the world, they decide to stay insular, then they can live as they see fit, just like the rest of us.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:38 AM
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It seems that the tribe in question has been known about since 1910.


You may recall, however, that in 2008, Survival International was embroiled in controversy when it released a different set of photos of undiscovered tribespeople in the Amazon on the Peruvian border; as it turned out, the existence of the tribe had been known since 1910, though it did not maintain regular contact with the outside world. So what’s the story this time around?


www.themarysue.com...

Now not saying there aren't any truly uncontacted tribes in the world this one doesn't seem to be one of them. And by uncontacted I mean no contact with the outside world ever...although it really seems that it isn't going to be long before those truly uncontacted tribes are actually contacted.

But good video none the less.


Just want to add this about the uncontacted tribe...

www.uncontactedtribes.org...

edit on 1-1-2015 by tsurfer2000h because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 09:42 AM
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a reply to: DrJunk




I say, give them the choice of joining the rest of the world, and if when presented with knowledge of the rest of the world, they decide to stay insular, then they can live as they see fit, just like the rest of us.

I think they know they have the choice but have chosen to stay as they are , they know there are loggers who destroy their homes and hunting grounds and kill them at any given opportunity.
There are other communities who have the trappings of modern society and could be approached if they wanted but they have made it clear by their actions that they have no interest in that.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Quite! The idea of "presenting them with knowledge of the rest of the world" is simply far too much in terms of depth and complexity for any transmission of such facts to be of use.

We grow up in this world and take many years to process such information, changing our minds and opinions over the years.

Just leave them the boat alone i say. Along with stopping encroaching on the territory that they need to have some privacy and the ability to roam, hunt and gather resources. In short the Forests there should be preserved for them to continue the lifestyle that they have surely practised for thousands of years, what with it being their ancestral home and all.

If folk want wood, make forestry plantations. It aint rocket science; but sadly geopolitics, greed and poverty get in the way of ensuring we don't gradually make this world a sterile homogeneous crap-hole.
edit on 1-1-2015 by skalla because: tie pow!



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 10:36 AM
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originally posted by: DrJunk
Why should we leave them alone? I've never understood this perspective. It seems paternal, like these aren't fully functioning humans capable of making their own decisions when it comes to contact with other groups of humans.

I say, give them the choice of joining the rest of the world, and if when presented with knowledge of the rest of the world, they decide to stay insular, then they can live as they see fit, just like the rest of us.


look at the world around would you want to bring them into this cesspit? the seem happy its there way of life leave them simples



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 10:40 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: DrJunk




I say, give them the choice of joining the rest of the world, and if when presented with knowledge of the rest of the world, they decide to stay insular, then they can live as they see fit, just like the rest of us.

I think they know they have the choice but have chosen to stay as they are , they know there are loggers who destroy their homes and hunting grounds and kill them at any given opportunity.
There are other communities who have the trappings of modern society and could be approached if they wanted but they have made it clear by their actions that they have no interest in that.


this ^^



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
I think they know they have the choice but have chosen to stay as they are , they know there are loggers who destroy their homes and hunting grounds and kill them at any given opportunity.
There are other communities who have the trappings of modern society and could be approached if they wanted but they have made it clear by their actions that they have no interest in that.


If they are uncontacted, then you have no way of knowing what their decision making process looks like, why they live the way they live, and whether or not they feel that they could benefit from outside technologies or ideas. This isn't Star Trek, and we have no Prime Directive. These are people with rights to resources that they do not even know exist for them. When they are aware of these resources, and still decide to live their own lives, in their own communities, like the Amish for example, that is their business, not ours.


originally posted by: haven123
look at the world around would you want to bring them into this cesspit? the seem happy its there way of life leave them simples


This is the paternal mindset I am talking about. We aren't the "guardians" of these people. They are not an other, they are humans with every right to the wealth of information and resources available to them as humans at this stage of our planet's history. To deny them because of a sense of protectionism is to treat them like endangered species whom need to be caged for their own benefit.

How do you know that no one in these communities would want to fly in an airplane or listen to a 40 piece orchestra if they knew these things existed?



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: DrJunk

They aren't being locked in there. Think man! They could damn well walk on out of there whenever the idea takes them. You make it sound like theyre prisoners and the bad old west ain't giving out the cookies. Don't politicize too much.

I can dig your hearts in the right place here


Read up on the anthropology of contacting tribes. A few links will do ya. 20th century contact encounters dont go well. Tribal elders have been to see our 'best' places like NYC. Man they did not like it one little bit. Its taken us 100s of years of contacts that killed the tribes to finally, at last (halleluja!!), have the tiniest spark of decency and compassion to leave those people alone.

We'll be bitching theyve been killed or integrated in 10 years time. Let's debate that sh*t then lol!



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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I saw the video a while back, and in my opinion contact should come very soon (their Native American Campa neighbors also seem to agree).

I've also seen documentaries on how some Amazonian peoples like the Shuar have been given equipment to use the Internet to network local and global responses when their territory is intruded upon by loggers or oil companies.
Access to media and some technology can really help people in frontier situations, where genocides can occur simply because the culprits think that nobody will ever know.

The question of "human zoo" vs. "forced integration" is an old one in colonialism, and both extremes have led to human rights abuses.

Thinking about the San (Bushmen) or Andaman Islanders, and I really don't think that placing people in a situation where they cannot enjoy some benefits of the modern world, but they also increasingly can no longer live traditionally, places them into a very vulnerable and disadvantaged position.

It's better to give them some tools that can help to secure their lands and cultures before they are lost.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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originally posted by: steamiron
a reply to: DrJunk

They aren't being locked in there. Think man! They could damn well walk on out of there whenever the idea takes them. You make it sound like theyre prisoners and the bad old west ain't giving out the cookies. Don't politicize too much.

I can dig your hearts in the right place here


Read up on the anthropology of contacting tribes. A few links will do ya. 20th century contact encounters dont go well. Tribal elders have been to see our 'best' places like NYC. Man they did not like it one little bit. Its taken us 100s of years of contacts that killed the tribes to finally, at last (halleluja!!), have the tiniest spark of decency and compassion to leave those people alone.

We'll be bitching theyve been killed or integrated in 10 years time. Let's debate that sh*t then lol!


This website, especially Aliens & UFOs, contradicts your premise.

People on this website are constantly complaining about being in a society that is kept away from valuable information by people that have it. Whether that be the NWO, the Illuminati, The Government, Bildeberg, Masons, Reptilians, whomever, we can very clearly be seen as the "uncontacted" in this scenario, especially when discussing ET conspiracies.

So, now, when the shoe is on the other foot, and we have information, technology, and resources that others do not, it would seem that some would advocate that we shield them from this knowledge, as to not disturb their quaint way of life, because it might upset them.

It's rubbish when people think they are hiding the truth about aliens, and it's rubbish when we are keeping information about ourselves from them.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 02:13 PM
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The best way to do it might be to let representatives from another isolated tribe from the general area, that was recently contacted, explain the pros and cons of contact with the rest of the world. They'd probably have the best perspective on it, especially if pre-contact times should be within living memory for this tribe.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: DrJunk




So, now, when the shoe is on the other foot, and we have information, technology, and resources that others do not, it would seem that some would advocate that we shield them from this knowledge, as to not disturb their quaint way of life, because it might upset them.

Not disturb them but kill them , it is a known that contact with outsiders can be fatal for these tribes.
In this report by Marcus Hamilton of the University of New Mexico they find the following.

Our analysis dramatically quantifies the devastating effects of European colonization on indigenous Amazonians. Not only did ~75% of indigenous societies in the Brazilian Amazon become extinct, but of the survivors, all show evidence of catastrophic population declines, the vast majority with mortality rates over 80%.


Although the report goes on to say ....

However, somewhat surprisingly, our results show that within a decade of peaceful contact most surviving populations rebound extremely fast, exhibiting annual population growth rates of ~4%.
www.nature.com...

Is that any consolation for those that die in the first few years ?
Who are we to say our way of life is any better than theirs , information and technology are only important in our reality not their's.



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Oh finally! I've been searching for this article all day for you since I read your post - well not consistently all day, but you know what I mean.
You might like it, it's about an American man who goes back to the Brazil/Venezuelan border to find his mother. She chose to go back to her tribe after years of living in America. It's a really well written article and brings up some important points.

www.bbc.co.uk...



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 04:36 PM
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a reply to: gortex

You are comparing the initial 16th century European colonizations of South America, which were devastating, with 21st attempts at contact, which aren't devastating.

Fascinating read, but I don't see the relevance, because we aren't killing indigenous tribes for colonialism anymore.



posted on Jan, 2 2015 @ 05:11 AM
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a reply to: DrJunk




You are comparing the initial 16th century European colonizations of South America, which were devastating, with 21st attempts at contact, which aren't devastating.

These reports are from 2014 , the dangers to the tribes from infection are as real today as they were then.

This is also putting such tribes at serious risk, as outsiders bring common bacteria into the natives' lands, exposing them to potentially life-threatening harm.
Though we have largely developed immunity to common diseases like measles or the common cold, uncontacted Indians have not, meaning they are especially vulnerable to them.
FUNAI recently treated seven members of Uncontacted Indian tribes for the flu, reportedly after non-Indians invaded their land with guns. Although once they returned to their communities they were free of the virus, they may be carrying other sorts of bacteria which could bring harm to their tribe once they return.
www.telegraph.co.uk...




because we aren't killing indigenous tribes for colonialism anymore.

No we're killing them for other reasons , they face 21st century dangers now.

Indigenous tribesmen living deep in the Peruvian rainforest have emerged into the outside world to seek help, after suffering a murderous attack by probable drug traffickers.

The contact took place across the border in Brazil and was recorded in a video released on Friday. The tribesmen caught a serious respiratory disease after contact, a major killer of isolated indigenous people, but have since recovered....
They asked for weapons and allies, according to Zé Correia, a member of the native Brazilian Ashaninka tribe who met them. The tribesmen told him they had been attacked in their forest homeland by non-Indians, most probably drug traffickers.


“Most people try to talk to them and give them tools and things to help them, and clothes,” said Francisco Estremadoyro of Propurus, a Peruvian organisation that sets up protection areas for such groups, and the Peruvian tribemen are reported to have taken clothes from the Ashaninka village.

Estremadoyro told the Guardian earlier in July: “The clothes you wear are full of germs. The tools you have at home look clean, but they have germs, so the possibility of spreading germs is very very high.”
www.theguardian.com...



edit on 2-1-2015 by gortex because: edit to add link




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