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It's Spanking Time!

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posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: jude11

the kid is just a brat - evidence :

one death threat and he turns tail


There is high likelihood the kid is autistic. This type of behavior is very common in children with autism. Spanking doesn't cure autism.

Keep repeating, "Deny ignorance... deny ignorance.... deny ignorance...."




posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 10:32 AM
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a reply to: Jamie1

From the 3 minute clip that you saw that your able to aptly diagnose him as autistic? every child who acts up Is not autistic. This kind of thinking is whats part of the problem for our mental health treatment in the country.

Up lets diagnose him as autistic and throw him on a pill. which can lead to other problems.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 11:34 AM
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a reply to: jude11

coming from Texas, I can swear to how effective a good ass whuppin' can be at getting the attention of a kid who doesn't seem to want to give you their attention.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Jamie1

utter twaddle :

skip to 00:57

the guy with the camera tells it :

" hit me with that and you gonna loose your life "

falsifies your pop psychology " autism " diagnosis



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
a reply to: Jamie1

utter twaddle :

skip to 00:57

the guy with the camera tells it :

" hit me with that and you gonna loose your life "

falsifies your pop psychology " autism " diagnosis


No, rather your post demonstrates your ignorance about autism.

There are many degrees of autism. I work with children on the "spectrum" as it's referred. Many are somewhat functional, and exhibit violent and aggressive behaviors. They can be physically controlled, sometimes with difficulty. They understand spoken words very well.

The behavior in the video is very much in line with behaviors exhibited by children with autism. Unlike my diagnosis of your ignorance, it's not a diagnosis of autism.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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When I was younger, I was a pretty bad kid. I got in trouble a lot and got spanked a lot. It probably helped shape me into a relatively normal person. I recall one time, in my early teens. I was upset at my mother for something I can't even remember. It wasn't even important, I think I wanted to to go hang out with friends or something.

She was washing the dishes, and I was throwing a hissy fit. She ignored me. So, I called her a b*tch.

And she threw a skillet at me. It beaned me real good in the noggin. I remember being shocked, bleeding, crying. Dad came in wondering what all the racket was about. I said "Mom threw a pan at me!". "Why?"

My mom responded "She called me b*tch."

My dad laughed his way out of the kitchen.

But you know what? To this day I have never called my mom the b-word again. I learned a very valuable lesson about respect. Something kids today sadly (especially in the U.S.) are badly lacking, respect for your parents.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: ScientificRailgun
I learned a very valuable lesson about respect. Something kids today sadly (especially in the U.S.) are badly lacking, respect for your parents.


Thanks for that.

I don't miss the "old days", most of it is selected memory (I'm 68).

But, I do miss the respect people showed for each other, for teachers, and kids for parents, etc.

Granted, respect is earned, but IMO we've swung way too far into self importance.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:18 PM
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originally posted by: Jamie1

There are many degrees of autism. I work with children on the "spectrum" as it's referred. Many are somewhat functional, and exhibit violent and aggressive behaviors. They can be physically controlled, sometimes with difficulty. They understand spoken words very well.

The behavior in the video is very much in line with behaviors exhibited by children with autism. Unlike my diagnosis of your ignorance, it's not a diagnosis of autism.


Where is the parent?

I'm raising a grandson on the spectrum. My daughter was ADD.

NEVER did I take them to an environment that would stimulate this kind of behavior.

I had an amazing doctor for my daughter. His first rule for the kids was Personal Responsibility. Autism is not an excuse for this incident.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: Jamie1

It could very well be autism.

Or, it could be that he's tired of gaurding the door while his sister is getting raped to pay for his mom's crack habit. We just don't know what's going wrong in this young boy's life to make him act out in such a way. Unfortunately we will probably never know.

PS: Please put on a bra, it's very distracting!



posted on Jan, 1 2015 @ 05:20 AM
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originally posted by: ScientificRailgun
When I was younger, I was a pretty bad kid. I got in trouble a lot and got spanked a lot. It probably helped shape me into a relatively normal person. I recall one time, in my early teens. I was upset at my mother for something I can't even remember. It wasn't even important, I think I wanted to to go hang out with friends or something.

She was washing the dishes, and I was throwing a hissy fit. She ignored me. So, I called her a b*tch.

And she threw a skillet at me. It beaned me real good in the noggin. I remember being shocked, bleeding, crying. Dad came in wondering what all the racket was about. I said "Mom threw a pan at me!". "Why?"

My mom responded "She called me b*tch."

My dad laughed his way out of the kitchen.

But you know what? To this day I have never called my mom the b-word again. I learned a very valuable lesson about respect. Something kids today sadly (especially in the U.S.) are badly lacking, respect for your parents.


Wow! Bet you never called her it again, you feared a projectile to the head! To me that's not respect, it's fear.



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 07:46 PM
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"Kids today..."

Do you realize that even the ancients talked about how bad "kids today" are? What a tired old trope! People have been hitting their kids since time immemorial, and they still hit them today.

Research shows kids turn out better when their parents reason with them rather than using corporal punishment. For example in the book "The Altruistic Personality" the authors found that children whose parents reasoned with them were more likely (as adults) to risk their own lives by defying authority figures to help others.

Sal

reply to: jude11



posted on Jan, 5 2015 @ 09:26 PM
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originally posted by: SallieSunshine
"Kids today..."

Do you realize that even the ancients talked about how bad "kids today" are? What a tired old trope! People have been hitting their kids since time immemorial, and they still hit them today.

Research shows kids turn out better when their parents reason with them rather than using corporal punishment. For example in the book "The Altruistic Personality" the authors found that children whose parents reasoned with them were more likely (as adults) to risk their own lives by defying authority figures to help others.

Sal

reply to: jude11



For the most part, I fully agree with this. I really prefer using Socratic teaching, as it makes them consider the reasons why. And then come up with the answer I want them to come up with. It teaches how to think.

But my youngest, until he was around 6 or 7, would have to have his attention gotten so he would focus on what I was trying to say. Somewhere around 6 or 7 a switch clicked, and he became a creature of reason. Which is something he takes great pride in as a teenager, as it gets him noticed for positive reasons in school.

The oldest has never been spanked in his life. Not once. He never needed it. I could get his attention/focus just by talking. But the youngest...he was something else. LOL...a real wild child. I get it, though. I was the exact same way.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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Sounds like you are saying your child is responsible for your reaction to his behavior. But no, you are responsible for your reaction and you chose to react with violence instead of reason.

Sal

reply to: jude11



But my youngest, until he was around 6 or 7, would have to have his attention gotten so he would focus on what I was trying to say. Somewhere around 6 or 7 a switch clicked, and he became a creature of reason. Which is something he takes great pride in as a teenager, as it gets him noticed for positive reasons in school.




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