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United Airlines sues 22-year-old who found method for buying cheaper plane tickets

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posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: t114forever

It is incumbant upon the airline to protect their own interests. If a flaw has been found in their business model, it is their job to resolve that flaw. Not the job of the police.

Especially when the risk is reporting.

ETA: i wonder if any multistory building with an elevator can seek damages from patrons who hold the floor number button down so that the elevator goes straight to their floor without stops? What about the lost efficiency from that sort of behavior? And when analyzing the usage of the elevators with all that skewed data causes them to do maintenance that really should not yet be scheduled....should that cost be shared by any patron who did that?
edit on 12/30/2014 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 06:19 PM
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Yes, now some technique that might not have been very well known (I've never heard of the term but have used the technique in the past, it's just common sense) will now go viral and everyone will know about it. Not to bright UA and Orbitz.



posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 06:34 PM
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There's substantially more to this then just lost profits, there's security concerns. Don't be too shocked if the government steps in and says you can't get away with doing this either.

And yes, those security concerns can cause delays, which in turn cause significant lost revenue for the airline.



posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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The guy being sued should turn the tables on them, and sue them for defamation. I would love to be on that jury and penalize them to the max.



posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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My wife is in the travel business and she says they use to book those flights all the time and then cancel the last leg of the flight. The airlines then banned agencies from cancelling the last leg of the flights. What is stopping someone from booking a flight with a layover to Chicago and then having a death in the family down in Indy and he leaves the flight in Chicago and rents a car to Indy thus not completing the full flight. What are they gonna do, sue a guy for a family member dying? UA are a bunch of idiots plain and simple.



posted on Dec, 30 2014 @ 11:23 PM
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originally posted by: Oldsguy
What is stopping someone from booking a flight with a layover to Chicago and then having a death in the family down in Indy and he leaves the flight in Chicago and rents a car to Indy thus not completing the full flight.

It has to do with an old FAA rule, one from even before 911, that says you cannot allow someones bags to remain on the aircraft if they get off the flight. In the case of an emergency, they will go through the time and effort to work with the passenger, but they won't do it to save you a few bucks on your ticket price. Bags are loaded according to the final destination and any transfers they might have to make. If you bought a ticket to go the full length of the trip, its probably buried behind things that have to come off the plane first. That may not sound like a big deal, but on a full narrow-body aircraft, you can be talking 20 to 30 minutes to retrieve a bag, and on a wide-body you might be talking about having to have the ramp unload an entire set of containers taking upwards of an hour.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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originally posted by: t114forever
Look, I'm all for demanding fairness and championing the consumer. But the strategy this guy capitalized on isn't just some nifty way to get discounted fares. It subverts the entire operational model at airlines on their layover flights. Air travel is already stretched razor-thin on their capacity so as not to have extra seats.

When you have people skipping out on their final leg in significant numbers, it will start skewing their reporting, estimates and planning models. Every number and penny, of which, goes into figuring fare prices, offerings, salary, capital expenditures, etc. Not to mention how much it can cloud the TSA/ DHS analytics.

Fortunately, I think so few people took advantage of this, it couldn't cause a 'significant' adverse effect.


wow, you are not going to be popular on this thread but i totally agree with you. for starters, i have actually been on a f'light where there were enough passengers from a delayed connecting flight that were late that they held the flight for them. what happens when it is just that a bunch of folks do not intend to take the flight?

do i think the model used by the airlines is outdated? yes.
did this guy do anything wrong? no.

but we do have to think of the ramifications of things like this.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:20 AM
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Isn't the solution for airlines blatantly obvious? Reduce the cost of the shorter flight.

I see the real problem, and its not about the luggage because these travelers don't check bags so when they don't show up for their next flight the system shows 0 bags and there isn't a problem. Its about the money the airline loses when a 1 leg trip is more expensive than the 2 leg trip with the layover where the 1 leg trip would have terminated. Obviously their cost model is messed up and based on demand instead of fuel consumption.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: t114forever

You have a fair point. One that I did not consider. Even so, suing this individual for "lost revenue" is at worst unbridled greed or at best a face saving strategy. If what you say is true and causes such problems for airlines; would not improving record keeping, readjusting expenditures and fine tuning pricing be the logical thing to do?

I can understand that this approach causes problems for airlines. I cannot understand how anyone is to blame except airlines themselves. I personally will never use services from these 2 named corps ever again.
edit on 31-12-2014 by My_Reality because: ERROR!



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 01:20 AM
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What's crazy is how they calculate how much to charge. Going from the East coast to the Philippines was $940. ~24 hour trip time. Going from Hawaii to Philippines was $890, 12 hours trip time.

Why is it more expensive to fly from point A to point B, than it is to fly from A to B to C.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:10 AM
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Ok, but on the flip side, wont that mean that the flight to tahoe will have empty unused seats that someone else could have had? If more people were to start doing this, then planes would be half empty and others would suffer as a result.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:29 AM
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a reply to: nydsdan

Skipping a leg as no bearing on their model. They can't use the seat anyway, it is yours for that trip. If you choose not to sit in it; it is still booked and can't be given to another person.

And you are paying the taxes fees and fuel charge for the whole flight anyway; so there is not lost revenue. In fact they may even have a cost saving as they may save some fuel not carrying the weight. Fuel by the way that you have already paid for.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:33 AM
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originally posted by: Anubis259
Ok, but on the flip side, wont that mean that the flight to tahoe will have empty unused seats that someone else could have had? If more people were to start doing this, then planes would be half empty and others would suffer as a result.

If you own a taxi and I pay you to drive me around, and I pay you whether I am in the taxi or not, how are you losing revenue? You are being paid.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 03:05 AM
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LOL Heres a nice show on the flaws of mankind...
They make a system
Down the line they find out that it can be manipualted
What do they do?
The go after the ones manipulating....
Thats STUPID, really really stupid...

What they should do is CHANGE the system...

And no, it doesnt say ANYWERE in my statement that a
system can be foolproof... But mankind CAN change and
adapt... We do it ALL the time, even if we dont notice
it ourselfs....



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: dismanrc
a reply to: nydsdan

Skipping a leg as no bearing on their model. They can't use the seat anyway, it is yours for that trip. If you choose not to sit in it; it is still booked and can't be given to another person.

And you are paying the taxes fees and fuel charge for the whole flight anyway; so there is not lost revenue. In fact they may even have a cost saving as they may save some fuel not carrying the weight. Fuel by the way that you have already paid for.



I read through this to see if someone was gonna say it. Lol

And really? There are people who don't know that this has been around?



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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originally posted by: dismanrc
a reply to: nydsdan

Skipping a leg as no bearing on their model. They can't use the seat anyway, it is yours for that trip. If you choose not to sit in it; it is still booked and can't be given to another person.

-snipped'-



That is not quite correct. If you skip a segment of your trip, and there is a standby passenger waiting at the airport where you decided not to get on, the gate agent can give your seat away if you are not on board just before the door closes.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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a reply to: Kuroodo

Sounds like a great idea...I should have thought of it!!
after skimming the thread it seems I'm behind the times I really had no clue you could do this
edit on 31-12-2014 by TWILITE22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: Kuroodo

It's not illegal at all, it is just exploiting a legal loophole left open by the airline themselves.

They didn't have to sue him, bringing more attention on the loophole, but simply close the loophole so this can't be used.

Silly airlines.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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I lol'd a bit...



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: Kuroodo

A judge should rule this a frivolous lawsuit brought on by the airline's embarrassment of having a known loophole exposed. There is no merit to their claim, if this has been been a common practice in the airline industry for years.



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