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Man sent back to prison for getting job that started too early in the morning

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posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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I hope you've enjoyed your holiday's so far. Today, I bring you some NLBS from London.

Ashley Stansfield has been sent back to prison last week because he took a job as a driver for a delivery company that started to early in the morning. He was serving an 18-month sentence for conspiracy to steal a car. He was recently released on license and was subject to a night-time curfew, that ended at 7am.

There was some failure of communication between The London Community Rehabilitation Company, one of several private companies put in place in June, and the Governor of the jail of which Stansfield was serving time.



A spokesman for LCRC said Stansfield’s parole officer had signed off permission to accept the job but they were waiting for the governor of the jail he was released from to do the same. That permission had not come through before Stansfield started work, therefore he was in breach of his licence and taken to Pentonville prison. Source




Laura Aubrey, a longstanding friend of Stansfield’s, said he had been punished for getting a job. ”It’s disgusting; he was so pleased to be starting work so soon after getting out of jail, he even bought his own uniform,” she said. source


His new job started at 6:15am... He violated curfew by 45 minutes.. How is sending people back to prison for minor infractions like this helping rehabilitation?




posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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Freaking insanity, way to kick a guy in the nuts who is obviously trying to do better..sometimes all it takes is one little break to change a life..or one non rational, non thinking robotic move to keep him down.


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posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: theNLBS

I have said it before, and I will likely as not have to say it many more times before I die.

When the Law does not serve the ends of Justice, then the Law becomes invalid in all the important senses of the word. Enforcing such Law as does not serve the ends of Justice, is itself unjust, and should be punished as readily as a breakage of the Law.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:52 AM
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Yep, pure BS. But, who gets 18 months for CONSPIRACY to steal a car? That's even more BS and he should have fired his attorney. I know of people who have ACTUALLY stolen a car and got less time. That man got double BS'd!



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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Ah the Great British justice system at its finest, where common sense shall not prevail regardless.

Rehabilitation is something the system pays lip service to, but evidently means absolutely zilch.

I previously worked for a training organisation that was awarded a Government contract to assist ex offenders back into employment. This involved working with the local probationary service initially, but all they were interested in was how much money we would pay them for any information relating to clients offences. They were not interested in rehabilitation, they were simply financially driven in an attempt to justify their own jobs.

The whole probationary service is not fit for purpose.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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one of several private companies put in place in June,


Private companies monitoring parolees, company owned prisons, all lead to one thing.
$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$
They're making money at both ends.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 11:57 AM
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a reply to: theNLBS

Are private contractors in charge of the jail system over there? Perhaps there are quotas to be met as far as jail population?



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:05 PM
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Well, I hate to say it but I agree with the decision. Part of getting out of jail means having the ability to follow rules. While this may have been an oversight by one or more people, if the guy had not committed a crime in the first place he would not have to worry about breaking a parole law. It is the system telling the newly released to be responsible and follow the law as it is written. It appears, while he got his parole officer to sign off on it, that this was one step in the process and he did not follow through with the rest before accepting and going to his new job prior to when his curfew was set.

While it is a shame it happened, it would have been a VERY simple thing to avoid.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:13 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

I think its fair to say you are genuinely just a bad person.
edit on Thu Jan 1 2015 by DontTreadOnMe because: Go After the Ball, Not the Player!



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:27 PM
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a reply to: Dabrazzo

Whoa...

Play the ball, not the player. Vasa Croe might have a different opinion to the one you hold, but that does not mean that Vasa Croe is any worse, or better than you, or anyone else. All it means is that their experience and understanding has led them to a different conclusion than the one you reached for yourself! I do not agree with Vasa Croe on this issue either, but that is no reason for me, or anyone else to cast doubt on the wholesomness of their character as a person! Good Lord!



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: Dabrazzo

my that's polite



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:35 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Nah, personally in my experiences with people that level of close mindedness and lack of empathy = bad person.

Sorry if he's "part of the gang" here and all that.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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originally posted by: Dabrazzo
a reply to: Vasa Croe

I think its fair to say you are genuinely just a bad person.


Ha! No, a bad person is the guy the story is about that was already a criminal.

The fact he never followed up to make sure he was clear to work makes him a bit dim-witted as well.

Laws are in place to follow, you break them and you have consequences. There are WAY too many sympathizers in the world today that are just ready to make any excuse they can and not own up to their own mistakes.

Look at it this way, if this guy was not already a criminal then this would never have happened.

How does this line of thought make ME the bad guy?



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: Dabrazzo

This is nothing to do with cliques and gangs and all that moronic malarkey. This is about simple discourse between people on a site which prides itself on the quality of the content and responses to the content, found on this site. It is also about basic respect and common courtesy, which are important aspects of membership here. As I said, if you want to respond to Vasa Croe's point, then go right ahead, but there is no justification for personally attacking the member in question, or any other member of this site, either in thread, or in U2U. There just is no place for that around these parts. This is not Facebook, this is not Twitter. This is ATS.

I can assure you, if someone came into a thread you were participating in and straight up attacked you, the response would be no different from me, and I would hope that it would be no different from anyone else. We ALL have the right to an opinion on the articles and subjects at hand, but none of us have the right under the Terms and Conditions of the site, to attack one another over differences of personal opinion.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: Dabrazzo
a reply to: TrueBrit

Nah, personally in my experiences with people that level of close mindedness and lack of empathy = bad person.

Sorry if he's "part of the gang" here and all that.


I am VERY open minded and have plenty of empathy, but that does not excuse the actions of a convicted criminal when it comes to parole violations. If I were a criminal attempting to make it back into society again, I would make sure to follow the rules. He obviously knew it had to be approved by another division, he just chose to go by what someone said versus having it in writing....sad, but ultimately it is his own fault, and again, he would not have been in this position had he not been a criminal in the first place.

And part of what gang?



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:48 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Meh perhaps you just happen to be more tolerant of close minded opinions than I am. Just dont expect everyone to be as tolerant though eh.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: theNLBS

Well and people are wondering why there is all this targeted cop killing....its stupid crap like this that make people have enough...and sends echos through the community. It is not just him...its his family that is effected and friends.

The legal system is trash on both ends...



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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a reply to: Dabrazzo

This is not about tolerance either.

As I said, play the ball, not the player. Failure to adhere to this basic principle will see you fall afoul of negative attention from the moderators, and is generally bad form anyway.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

You always hit the nail on the head



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Dabrazzo
a reply to: Vasa Croe

I think its fair to say you are genuinely just a bad person.


The fact he never followed up to make sure he was clear to work makes him a bit dim-witted as well.


He was given the all clear by his probation officer, he should not have to follow up with the prison governor, that's the probation officers job.



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