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Sony Hack Reveals That MPAA's Big '$80 Million' Settlement With Hotfile Was A Lie

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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Sony Hack Reveals That MPAA's Big '$80 Million' Settlement With Hotfile Was A Lie

Remember all the huge settlements the MPAA claimed they were awarded against certain websites for copyright infringement? Well, it turns out that what they actually they got was much less than what they claimed in the media.

In the case of Hotfile vs MPAA, the MPAA claimed they won $80 million but only actually got $4 million in the settlement. They sent out press releases saying they got the full $80 million just to intimidate other would-be copyright infringers.

The really sad part about all this is that the supposed harmed artists got little (if anything) from the settlement.




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:23 PM
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More proof that the media is either in on it or they don't bother fact checking when receiving info from certain sources. Disgusted but not surprised. I guess anyone can write history these days when nobody investigates the truth. +1 for the hackers.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:27 PM
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"Hollywood" has always been a cesspool for professional BeeEss.

Masters of illusions.

But the cash they skim off the top is very real.




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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I was thinking the same thing especially the not surprising part .Something we have come to expect from MSM that will always try to drive some sort of agenda I suppose .Makes watching honey bo bo mor exceptable because that might just actually be true :>) a reply to: eisegesis



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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originally posted by: eisegesis
More proof that the media is either in on it or they don't bother fact checking when receiving info from certain sources. Disgusted but not surprised. I guess anyone can write history these days when nobody investigates the truth. +1 for the hackers.

It can't be fact checked sometimes. The settlements are sealed.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So I guess it begs the question, why report it if it can't be verified? Are we supposed to just take their word for it?


The settlement is the second major one that the MPAA has completed in as many months. In October, Hollywood studios announced a $110 million deal with IsoHunt that resulted in the shutdown of the BitTorrent indexer.

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I'll guess we'll never know if that one is true either.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:49 PM
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originally posted by: eisegesis
a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So I guess it begs the question, why report it if it can't be verified? Are we supposed to just take their word for it?

I would not be surprised if part of the settlement is to give MPAA the right to claim the $40 million without it being contradicted. So it's reported because that is what is said by the parties involved. If the settlement is sealed, then that is the highest level of fact checking available.

The aim is to scare people. The MSM sucks, but you can't put this on them.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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I have a question. When someone's email lets say, gets hacked, who is releasing the hacked info? How can we verify that the supposed hacked info is true? Do we just believe the hackers?



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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a reply to: Shadoefax

I still think the whole thing is a giant viral marketing campaign.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 02:45 AM
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The MPAA is just a racketeering shakedown operation.

I remember reading a report a few years ago now, about the MPAA and it's shady operations against copyright theft crimes. As it turned out, with about $400Million won in settlements, almost nothing had been passed along to the "artists" or copyright holders who they claim to be protecting. Nearly all of that money went in paying the MPAA lawyers fees.

A nice little money making scheme.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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originally posted by: eisegesis
a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So I guess it begs the question, why report it if it can't be verified? Are we supposed to just take their word for it?


The settlement is the second major one that the MPAA has completed in as many months. In October, Hollywood studios announced a $110 million deal with IsoHunt that resulted in the shutdown of the BitTorrent indexer.

Link

I'll guess we'll never know if that one is true either.


Well, it depends on how it is worded. Say for instance, the media reported that "Company X claims to have been awarded 80 million in the settlement." it is different to saying "Company X won 80 million in the settlement."

You can only report the facts as they are presented to you as facts. Investigative journalism is not usually the front page of the local rag.

Some want the plebeians to suffer under the hands of the monster, because they feel that they are thieves, stealing the bread from starving artists mouths. Or that the song "who copied that floppy" is a legit take on the way things work in the world of copyright infringement.

Or they are just ignorant, and take it all at face value, and report what they are told verbatim.

and when you're selling a $2 rag every day, you don't care much for veracity, because you can fix it tomorrow. Your readers, will still buy it to entertain themselves while taking the morning constitutional.

Do we accuse them of being shady? in on it? I don't think we need to take it that far, YET... not for the bottom feeding media.

If it's large, it's in charge... same with a news story.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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And now it seems even Sony itself has jumped on the copyright infringement bandwagon.


But while Sony deals with rampant piracy issues at one end, it’s now facing copyright infringement allegations of its own. According to new claims, Sony used copyrighted music in The Interview without permission and without compensating an artist.


Sony About to Get Sued For Pirating Music in The Interview



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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a reply to: Shadoefax


But while Sony deals with rampant piracy issues at one end, it’s now facing copyright infringement allegations of its own. According to new claims, Sony used copyrighted music in The Interview without permission and without compensating an artist.



Spellbinding Irony



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: Shadoefax

Heh, and the name of the song is "Pay Day".



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