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Thinkaholic

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:38 AM
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Do you like to think a lot? If so, what do you believe drives you to think so much? Curiosity for the unknown? An intrinsic motivation for facts that is ingrained in your DNA and strengthened by life experiences? A strong thirst for knowledge and answers? The what, who, why and when behind reality and existence? Maybe you just enjoy exercising your brain. Possibly a combination of all of the above? Do you find yourself observing other people during your daily tasks and wondering what their life story might entail? Do you analyse potential outcomes for situations in which you need to make decisions?

Perhaps you spend a large portion of each day pondering about the functioning of reality and your existence. What is life and your role in it? Do you have a purpose here? What kinds of other beings might exist? Do other planets out there support life, and how does this relate back to the grand functioning of the universe? Is everything that exists the product of a random sequence of events or has everything been planned down to the most minute of detail?

Maybe you have grown tired of the daily grind and decided to question why you continue to fall into the same pattern. Why do you work or study? What motivates you to get out of bed and function during the day? Why do you feel more comfortable repeating the same daily tasks instead of taking a risk and trying something different? Who do you answer to and why? When will you be able to break the current cycle you find yourself in?

Are you a Thinkaholic?




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:43 AM
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I think not.
Regular meditation is the antidote to thinkahloism.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:56 AM
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I've always been a chronic day dreamer, ever since I can remember. In fact, I think so much I'm sure it could be diagnosed as a disorder, lol.

Don't really know why, Probably a bit of all the reasons you mentioned in your OP. If I tried to guess myself, I'd come off sounding like a real arrogant prick, to be totally honest.

I can't say I like people, in fact, I'd go so far as to say I hate being around people for any long length of time and way prefer my own company, I just find myself so much easier to deal with. But I am fascinated by people and what makes them click.

When ever I have some spare cash, my favorite thing in the world is to just get in the car and drive for as long as possible. It's just amazing driving though all the many different towns and cities, just spinning out about all the many people that inhabit them and how they are all doing there own thing and all have there own little trip and life journey.

It's fascinating to me how humans live all boxed into there own neck of the woods like that, just living out there pointless insignificant little lives like they do.
edit on 28-12-2014 by Subaeruginosa because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:01 AM
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I personally believe there is much more than the current materialistic world.
So many things are hidden and have yet to be discovered.
The curiosity for the unknown is my main power which keeps me going.
Everyday I learn more and more.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:34 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

Deep thinking has many merits, of course, but it is also something that can get out of control. Thinkaholic is a very great term for this problem. There are a few explanations for it... that I can think of.

One comes from a theory of the evolution of the human mind/brain by Tony Wright: Left in the Dark:


‘Release the genius inside you – Shut down your brain’ announced the cover of the New Scientist in April 2004.

For the last three years scientists at the Centre for the Mind have been attempting to find out if a higher level of mental functioning may be available to all of us. Professor Allan Snyder has proposed that such functions are latent in everyone and are suppressed by the activity of the ‘evolutionary advanced’ rational side of the brain. By ‘switching off’ the left side of the brain, they hoped to turn ‘normal’ people into ‘geniuses’.


Initially treated with scepticism, recent results have caused shock waves in the scientific community. It appears that a whole new layer of function lies dormant in all of us. Have they found the key to our future evolution or have they unknowingly unlocked an ancient mystery that has its origins in prehistory?


A new theory of human evolution, proposed by Tony Wright and Graham Gynn in ‘Left in the Dark’, convincingly argues that the human brain owes part of its extraordinary development to the biochemistry of a specialist fruit diet. The hormone-related chemicals in tropical fruit initiated an internal hormone mechanism that increasingly promoted brain growth and elevated neural activity. When humans were forced from their tropical forest ‘Garden of Eden’ some two hundred thousand years ago, this link with biochemically rich fruit was lost.


The internal hormone mechanism that fuelled brain expansion stalled, and the process went into reverse. This caused a breakdown in part of the brain; some functions were lost and our sense of self changed for the worse – a golden age descended in stages to our present materialist, fear-based age of plastic and Prozac. These neurological effects are now being revealed and verified by today’s cutting edge science.


Another explanation for "thinkaholicism" can be attributed to mental health issues and defects in the brain - specifically the 'cingulate gyrus', as researched by psychiatrist Dr. Daniel Amen.


Over-Focused A.D.D./A.D.H.D.

Symptoms: Primary ADD symptoms plus cognitive inflexibility, trouble shifting attention, being stuck on negative thoughts or behaviors, worrying, holding grudges, argumentativeness, oppositional, and saddled with a need for routines. It is often seen in families with addiction problems or obsessive-compulsive tendencies.

Common Spect Findings: Usually high anterior cingulate activity plus low prefrontal cortex with concentration.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:37 AM
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I hear you. I think a lot about the deep things. Too much. And thinking about them just brings up more questions. Which in turn makes me think deeper and think more about them. Unfortunately, there are no real answers to the big questions while we are alive and so all this thinking just makes the questions pile higher and higher. It's maddening. Almost literally maddening.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: Jainine
I hear you. I think a lot about the deep things. Too much. And thinking about them just brings up more questions. Which in turn makes me think deeper and think more about them. Unfortunately, there are no real answers to the big questions while we are alive and so all this thinking just makes the questions pile higher and higher. It's maddening. Almost literally maddening.


If there was peace 'inside' then there would be harmony all around.
If it is noticed that there is thinking.............can it be noticed that That which notices, is quiet?



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:05 AM
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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:36 AM
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If we label the brain as the "thinker" who is the one that sits back and observes the brain doing all the "thinking"?

Then that part of me thinks about what it has observed my silly brain thinking about.

It appears to go on and on into an infinite amount of thinkers/observers.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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Thinking is one thing. Taking act and initiative to put your thoughts into practice is another. I find myself stuck at the former most of the time. I hope I will get better at the latter as time progresses.

Sometimes, at night, when I cannot fall asleep because my mind is disturbed with thoughts, my thought pattern is very chaotic. When that happens, I'm not fully conscious. Everything is going to fast at that moment. It feels like that neurotic connections are being made and destroyed at the same time. When it reaches it's climax, I jump out of bed drenched in sweat. It is like my mind is being probed with thoughts that I cannot process at the same time. I figure that this is an example of the limited capacity of my brain.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:32 AM
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originally posted by: TheRyder001
I personally believe there is much more than the current materialistic world.
So many things are hidden and have yet to be discovered.
The curiosity for the unknown is my main power which keeps me going.
Everyday I learn more and more.


Me too. I have no idea why I was given/cursed with this desire to know all about it.

Part of it has to do with awareness. Are our pursuits selfish? Could we care less about others and the world as long as we are getting what we want? Or is there some inner compass that wants to see others live in peace.

I guess some of that stems from how we were raised. There is that other kernel, though.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

I am definately a thinkaholic, and the question is interesting to think about. (of course I'd say that
)

I think that it developed when I was young, and my parents were very young, and part of their hippy time period, in which they didn't want to brainwash children with ideas, and leave them free to learn through experience and develop their personality with as little influence as possible. In other words, to neglect them and go off in search of their own self fulfilment.

This left me mostly alone to face what seemed to be a very complex and dangerous world. There were no limits placed upon me, which injury or death could be around any corner- it was up to me to be observant, to learn how things work and be able to anticipate potential effects and consequences. This took up a lot of mental energy.


With time, it just became habit. At times, I have been neurotic, and even think my brain burns a lot of my calories, because I can stay relatively thin even if I eat a lot.

Learning to meditate helped me to learn to turn off the mind, as has solitary outdoor activities (hiking, horseback riding). I must have time for these activities, to be balanced.

But I also learned to like thinking, found there is a lot of pleasure to be found in it, so that too, I need to make time for! I used to have people around me I could engage with in philosophical explorations, but now my only outlet for that is over the computer.

The work I do now, I like especially because it engages both my physical energy and intelligence, as well as mental. Being a cook, I have to stay extremely conscious of my every movement, as well as the others in the periphery. Carefully carrying a boiling pot, while gracefully dancing around the other cooks, planning in head all the steps I'll do in the next four hours, and keeping track of what I have already done and where I've placed it.......I feel like I am engaging all parts of mind and body.

I am too exhausted at the end of the day to think much, I prefer to do that in the morning (when I am on ATS!)

But since I realized how this came about, I wondered- do people that have a lot of protection when young, being fed their perspectives and world view from adults, do they learn the same pleasure in thinking?



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:19 AM
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Thoughts that arise are a great source of amusement - just part of the great tapestry of life. It is only when the thoughts appear to be personal that they might cause one to worry!



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: ProsceniumProtagonist
If we label the brain as the "thinker" who is the one that sits back and observes the brain doing all the "thinking"?

Then that part of me thinks about what it has observed my silly brain thinking about.

It appears to go on and on into an infinite amount of thinkers/observers.



The idea that thinking is done by the brain is just a concept - what is the direct experience of thought?
Thought is of the appearance - it seems to appear and then move and change to another thought. The observer is not moving or changing.
The space which thought appears in is transparent - it cannot be seen as it is the seeing space of awareness.
There may be many thoughts but there is only the one observer of thought.
Can any thing (thought) appear to have existence without the observing presence?



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:40 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

Perhaps you spend a large portion of each day pondering about the functioning of reality and your existence. What is life and your role in it? Do you have a purpose here?




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

I think so much that thinking has taken over most of my dreams.

Instead of dreaming that I'm somewhere doing something, I dream of thinking / meditating on questions, and often times, the questions that I dream of are relative to, but not exactly the same as, the things I had recently been thinking of - the questions are generally offshoots of, or in some way linked to, something that I had recently been thinking about -- just like normal dreams are offshoots of something you had recently experienced...

And I wake up with answers. I kid you not.

Oh and as for your question...

I think I'm a thinkaholic because of two things: First, and foremost, I'm an introvert. Secondly, I was praised for being smart as a child - I was good at thinking and coming up with answers. Through those things, I gained an addiction to problem solving / deep thought - it makes me feel happy of myself / releases dopamine to find answers that I, myself, came to understand. I assume most others are dopamine addicts as well, and are also addicted to finding their own answers, but how they got there will probably vary. Maybe there's some trust issues too? We can see there are different answers than what we are being fed, and so we seek the only place we feel we can trust - inside our own minds. Idk, probably a lot of reasons... never thought about it before. Good question.
edit on 12/28/2014 by Bleeeeep because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:54 PM
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originally posted by: ProsceniumProtagonist
If we label the brain as the "thinker" who is the one that sits back and observes the brain doing all the "thinking"?

Then that part of me thinks about what it has observed my silly brain thinking about.

It appears to go on and on into an infinite amount of thinkers/observers.




This is well put. The dynamic described, i found to be the first major hurdle when beginning to meditate.
i would intend to "stop thinking", and find myself thinking, "i am trying to stop thinking... oh there is a thought. Oh now i was thinking, the thought that i had a thought. i stopped thinking!... Oh, i had thought, abut having stopped thinking thinking, and..."
HA HA Ha.

I clearly remember, though, how i surmounted this hurdle. It was by understanding a certain concept, or visualization.
The Idea came from a book about the song of Mahamudra by Tilopa i think. The book was called Only One Sky, and that title alluded to the concept to which i refer.

So does Itisnowagain's post.



If there was peace 'inside' then there would be harmony all around. If it is noticed that there is thinking.............can it be noticed that That which notices, is quiet?


The idea is that the observer of thoughts, the "I" whom watches the thinker and thoughts, is still, in its singularity, and of a peaceful nature.
The analogy is that, this "i" perceives the mind, as a whole as a clear blue sky. The thoughts that arise are as clouds, ceaselessly parading across the clear, still, mind.
As an observer of clouds, we may become attached to a particular one, and suddenly the mind will go to great lengths to identify the cloud.."it is high, it is white, looks like my first wife, wonder where she's at..."

Now, the dynamic applied when visualizing Mind as Only One Sky, and thoughts as passing clouds, is one of non attachment. By observing the whole of thoughts, or clouds, from the perspective of that which contains them- we are not attached to a particular cloud or thought, and thereby whisked by attachment into the mental monolog. Now we can observe the whole of thought in its wondrous convolutions. This is by identifying with the unity of a boundless and eternal clear blue sky, rather than the ever-changing, temporal clouds of thought.

So, personally, this visualization tool, with practice, allowed me to peacefully engage the thought process from a whole and still perspective, the true seat of the observer we all are.

To seek Mind with the mind
is the greatest of all mistakes.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:41 PM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

Yes, I anaylse and over anaylse everything.
It's a bit of a curse in my opinion.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: HarbingerOfShadows

It is a curse in the sense that it consumes so much energy and makes you second-guess yourself when it's unnecessary to do so. It also limits the time you can put those thoughts into productive and meaningful actions.



posted on Dec, 29 2014 @ 04:23 AM
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a reply to: Dark Ghost

What drives me are questions that I ask myself that have not yet been answered. I seek to answer these questions, one at a time. Often I have epiphanies, answers that appear to come to me, a process of elimination that produces likely solutions, sometimes some of them are the key that fits the lock, so to speak, and thus I unlock more knowledge that I am able to integrate into my consciousness. The intrinsic motivation is hard to pinpoint, however I generally have questions about my past and past lives, because, I get vague recollections that I use to piece together a complete picture, and the realisations that I come to only really serve to create more questions for me to answer. Thus, it is a continual process, thoughts building up on thoughts, reaching various "stages" and the further I "advance" the more complex my thoughts become - based on all the thoughts that I have had before. I do ask questions about existence, and usually I end up having to challenge many concepts that I have "learned" over time through various sources, and in turn this also generates further "questions".

I do look into human psychology and motivations, and also like to analyse people from the perspective of their development, and any hurdles that they have come across, that in my mind, from my own standpoint of principles, are the causes of their "problems" in various ways.

I like to delve into my past, and question "what if" - what if I made a different decision, and why did I make the decisions that I did, and what would be the alternate outcome if I had made a different choice.

I do ponder existence, and I have figured out that I want to exist, and I have also figured out that many have basically "given up" on existence, accepting various "fates"... I want to be "perfect" and "complete" - I want to be more than just a human, I want to be a complete entity, that has the freedom to explore all kinds of realities. There are many beings that exist, and I have learnt to categorise them and their abilities as well.

I do believe in other intelligent life from other worlds, however, not necessarily belonging to this particular reality, and I have experienced interactions with many different kinds of beings in my "quest".

When it comes to chance, new events are the result of chance, things that have never happened before, however, when it comes to everything else, it is like time is "recycled" over again in different combinations, and the changes made to cyclical time are due to higher sentience, and sometimes even lower sentience. There is some kind of "war" to literally guide the occurrence of time itself however those beings obsessed with control do suffer when confronted with uncertainty, something that they are vulnerable to and have learnt to defend against.

I see complete freedom in new domains, where new events are allowed to occur, where things are far more interesting than they are here, where things are "controlled".

When it comes to my daily life, really, all I need is independence and a comfortable dwelling, something that I am working on obtaining.

Yes, I would call myself a think-a-holic and as long as I pose further questions to myself, there will always be new realisations and thus more thoughts. In a way I feel like my mind has developed substantially since I first "started" and since things really started to progress from their simple beginnings.

I have made radical progress within the last few years, namely, thoughts that directly translate into real outcomes, it is the next stage for me, the power of the mind to influence reality. This ability is still in its early stages, and supported by a very complex outlook on what defines "real" and "unreal" and also pertains to the nature of the control systems in place that stifle our abilities and that also control reality so that we cannot observe their outcomes for a substantial amount of time.


edit on 29-12-2014 by SystemResistor because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-12-2014 by SystemResistor because: (no reason given)




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