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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:00 AM
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a reply to: Daughter2

Someone from the transportation ministry also said they were looking at the plane having possibly exploded in flight. They've gotten very little right and have been covering their ass the whole time.

The crew may have gotten overwhelmed and just missed the radio calls if they were out of contact that long. It's doubtful that an updraft caused the climb though.




posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 01:19 AM
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originally posted by: Daughter2

The steep climb happened three minutes AFTER they didn't answer air traffic control.

So there were three minutes before the alleged updraft that the pilots didn't answer?


My guess is that they experienced some bad turbulence when they asked for deviation.
Situation might have gone from bad to worse, and believe me the last thing on anybodys mind in severe turbulence is communication.
First priority is to get out of it.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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It's strange how all these air Asian flights keep disappearing. Makes you wonder if it's an intentional mass murder.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: tazainc

It's happened in the past that a single airline has lost multiple planes. In this case maintenance and crew training can't keep up with route expansion.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 06:25 PM
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They've begun the attempt to raise the fuselage.



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 04:24 AM
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originally posted by: Ivar_Karlsen

originally posted by: Daughter2

The steep climb happened three minutes AFTER they didn't answer air traffic control.

So there were three minutes before the alleged updraft that the pilots didn't answer?


My guess is that they experienced some bad turbulence when they asked for deviation.
Situation might have gone from bad to worse, and believe me the last thing on anybodys mind in severe turbulence is communication.
First priority is to get out of it.
True tho transponder at 7700 would have helped alert ground stns



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 03:41 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: Ivar_Karlsen

originally posted by: Daughter2

The steep climb happened three minutes AFTER they didn't answer air traffic control.

So there were three minutes before the alleged updraft that the pilots didn't answer?


My guess is that they experienced some bad turbulence when they asked for deviation.
Situation might have gone from bad to worse, and believe me the last thing on anybodys mind in severe turbulence is communication.
First priority is to get out of it.
True tho transponder at 7700 would have helped alert ground stns


Have you ever actually tried resetting a transponder in severe or extreme turbulence? I think I'd rather have a pilot devote full attention (and both hands) to actuallly flying the airplane. The guys on the ground are nice guys but they aren't going to teleport up and gentle your bucking bronco.



posted on Jan, 29 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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Reports are it was the copilot flying when flight started to ascended.




Second-in-command Remi Plesel was flying Flight QZ8501 prior to it crashing into the sea, not Captain Iriyanto - an experienced former military jet pilot - head National Transport Safety Committee (NTSC) investigator Mardjono Siswosuwarno announced today.

Cpt Iriyanto, 53, is believed to have taken over control of the aircraft from First Officer Plesel when it started to ascend and then descend sharply, officials said.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...




Investigators said the cockpit voice and flight data recorders showed that the plane had been cruising at a stable altitude before the crash.
The aircraft was in sound condition when it took off and all crew members were properly certified, they said.

'The plane was flying before the incident within the limits of its weight and balance envelope,' investigator Siswosuwarno said. 'While the flight crew had valid licences and medical certificates.'

Indonesian officials previously said the aircraft climbed abruptly from its cruising height and then stalled, or lost lift, before plunging out of control into the sea.

NTSC chief Tatang Kurniadi told the same Jakarta news conference that Indonesia had submitted its preliminary report on the crash to the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on Wednesday, as required under global aviation rules.

The report, which has not been made public, was purely factual and contained no analysis, he said, adding that the full, final report would take at least six to seven months to complete.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...

edit on 29-1-2015 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 12:49 AM
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originally posted by: F4guy

originally posted by: Nochzwei

originally posted by: Ivar_Karlsen

originally posted by: Daughter2

The steep climb happened three minutes AFTER they didn't answer air traffic control.

So there were three minutes before the alleged updraft that the pilots didn't answer?


My guess is that they experienced some bad turbulence when they asked for deviation.
Situation might have gone from bad to worse, and believe me the last thing on anybodys mind in severe turbulence is communication.
First priority is to get out of it.
True tho transponder at 7700 would have helped alert ground stns


Have you ever actually tried resetting a transponder in severe or extreme turbulence? I think I'd rather have a pilot devote full attention (and both hands) to actuallly flying the airplane. The guys on the ground are nice guys but they aren't going to teleport up and gentle your bucking bronco.
Nope tho have been in moderate turbulence. But even so tonto could have tuned it in stages to complete 7700.



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 02:00 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

They may not have known they were in trouble. Even so, rule 1-99 of dealing with an emergency is fly the damn plane.



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 05:57 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Nochzwei

They may not have known they were in trouble. Even so, rule 1-99 of dealing with an emergency is fly the damn plane.
Yes ANC rules, but 2 pilot config can do multi tasking to some extent at least. Tho they may not have realized that they were in imminent danger



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

And in an emergency both pilots are dealing with the emergency. A 7700 isn't dealing with the emergency. There's nothing that anyone on the ground can do to help, so putting out a 7700 instead of troubleshooting the problem and dealing with it doesn't make sense.



posted on Jan, 30 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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According to Indonesian sources, the crew was dealing with multiple alerts from the flight augmentation system, and ended up shutting the system off.



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 12:02 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Nochzwei

And in an emergency both pilots are dealing with the emergency. A 7700 isn't dealing with the emergency. There's nothing that anyone on the ground can do to help, so putting out a 7700 instead of troubleshooting the problem and dealing with it doesn't make sense.
It does make sense as all pilots in their career have always dealt with multi tasking numerous times, but any way its your point of view which does hold some merit.



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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Another link to latest developments on topic:

The captain of Indonesia AirAsia Flight QZ8501 was out of his seat, preoccupied with computer problems, when his plane was swept up by a massive storm updraft.



edit on 31/1/2015 by Dark Ghost because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: Nochzwei

It's the point of view of almost every pilot out there. What can the ground do for you after switching to 7700? Are they going to fly the plane for you?



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 09:26 AM
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As i've said before, AF all over again. wouldn't surprise me if the co-pilot was pulling back on the stick as the plane was dropping altitude unbeknownst to the Captain.
edit on 31-1-2015 by Soloprotocol because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-1-2015 by Soloprotocol because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 09:44 AM
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The question now is why were the computers acting up.



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Nochzwei

It's the point of view of almost every pilot out there. What can the ground do for you after switching to 7700? Are they going to fly the plane for you?
They cannot fly the plane but prepare for contingency like rescue after ditching / pancaking and what have you. I would set the transponder anyway while simultaneously dealing with whatever emergency was present



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 10:03 AM
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originally posted by: Soloprotocol
As i've said before, AF all over again. wouldn't surprise me if the co-pilot was pulling back on the stick as the plane was dropping altitude unbeknownst to the Captain.
The AF FO blundered like a novice and it would be a real pity if this FO did likewise. Bloody annoying and tragic at the same time



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