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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Jan, 16 2015 @ 11:46 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Man i do hope the passengers were oblivious to how serious/perilous a situation they were in..So Sad.




posted on Jan, 16 2015 @ 11:47 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Best guess is they knew something wasn't right, but not how serious the problem was. Unless something odd comes out on the recorders, the chances are that they never had an idea that they were crashing.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 01:37 PM
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Ok, What's the bloody hold up.?
They have had plenty time to go over the Black Boxes...What's the verdict. ?

The Longer they piss about the more chance the truth will be turned onto a conspiracy/coverup for Christ's sake...



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 01:43 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

It will be a little while before they release all the information from the boxes. They're going to do everything they need to do(i.e. crash reports) with them before anything is released.



posted on Jan, 18 2015 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

When the NTSB investigates an accident it can be two to three weeks before a transcript is released. And months for an animation.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 12:10 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Soloprotocol

When the NTSB investigates an accident it can be two to three weeks before a transcript is released. And months for an animation.


Once they have to black box it's probably a few hours until they have a basic transcript.


Why withhold the info from the family?

I'm not buying into these delays. The knew right away the approximate area of the crash based on when the plane went off radar. It's located in just 150 feet of water.

No way should large pieces still be unrecovered.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 12:33 AM
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a reply to: Daughter2

Except that recovering the airplane is way more difficult than that. Just because it went off radar somewhere means that's the final resting place. The airplane exploded into a bunch of different pieces on impact, pieces which were strewn across miles and miles of oceans by strong currents.

Weather, sea currents, and underwater visibility are all things that have hampered recovering all the wreckage so far.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: Daughter2

Do you know what even getting a transcript entails?

They have to recover the recorder obviously. Then they have to download it. Once downloaded, a team of four to five people start listening to it. If there is any doubt a majority have to agree with what they think was said. Then they listen to it again.

They listen to it at least three times before having a basic transcript done.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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originally posted by: Daughter2

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Soloprotocol

When the NTSB investigates an accident it can be two to three weeks before a transcript is released. And months for an animation.


Once they have to black box it's probably a few hours until they have a basic transcript.


Why withhold the info from the family?

I'm not buying into these delays. The knew right away the approximate area of the crash based on when the plane went off radar. It's located in just 150 feet of water.


And when BA038 crash landed at Heathrow, with no fatalities whatsoever, so that never mind the CVR and FDR, they could interview the pilots, it still took the AAIB a month to put out a bulletin to say anything.

Or consider US1549 aka 'The Miracle on The Hudson', it still took a while to release such information despite them knowing exactly where to look - in the middle of the Hudson River.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: apex

And look at the difficulty they had recovering an intact aircraft from a shallow river in that incident. A river that is perfectly calm and flat most of the time.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:46 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Daughter2

Do you know what even getting a transcript entails?

They have to recover the recorder obviously. Then they have to download it. Once downloaded, a team of four to five people start listening to it. If there is any doubt a majority have to agree with what they think was said. Then they listen to it again.

They listen to it at least three times before having a basic transcript done.


I don't see why the transcript can not be released to the family and media.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

Because it was only just gotten half of it completed. They had to use computer enhancement because of background noise. Every sound in the cockpit is recorded and frequently blots out the voices making it that much harder.

It's not just a matter of finding the recorder and listening to it.
edit on 1/19/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 10:18 PM
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originally posted by: Daughter2
They listen to it at least three times before having a basic transcript done.

I don't see why the transcript can not be released to the family and media.


I believe that these things take time to analyze my friend. We have emotional, as well as legal implications that need to be addressed and processed.

However, I will say that if it were my family members involved in this tragedy, I would be on the authorities in control of this disaster every single day 24/7 for an answer.

I cant even fathom how they all must feel, and I don't wish to ever know the pain that they are all experiencing either. I wish them all the best. ~$heopleNation
edit on 19-1-2015 by SheopleNation because: TypO



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: SheopleNation

They're having to use a computer to filter background noise on the CVR, and they're examining the previous 72 flights on the FDR, which records 1200 parameters.

Under their law only the relevant portions will be released. The full transcript won't be.



posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 11:05 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thank you my friend, Appreciate the update Zaphod. I know that you have a lot of experience concerning this subject. Hopefully soon the families will have the information that they desperately are in need of. ~$heopleNation



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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Citing radar data the aircraft reportedly hit a 6,000 fpm climb rate.

The preliminary report will be released on the 28th.



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

What law controls the release of the transcript? I would think the tapes would be the property of the airlines unless there was a valid court order. Is there some other law that controls ownership?

I would assume a civil case could force the release?

Or are you telling me government agencies take possession and then retain permanent control to decide what is released to the public?



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 11:35 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

Indonesian law. Just like US law controls what gets released by the NTSB.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Daughter2

Because it was only just gotten half of it completed. They had to use computer enhancement because of background noise. Every sound in the cockpit is recorded and frequently blots out the voices making it that much harder.

It's not just a matter of finding the recorder and listening to it.


You are exactly right. It's not simply a matter of plugging earphones into the CVR and transcribing. To identify many of the ambient noises, you must correlate output from the DFDR. And since that box records 88 groups of data, it takes a while. Some of the "groups" of parameters captured by the DFDR have multiple entries, like, for instance, instantaneous N2. Anyone wanting to listen to some raw CVR audio can go to www.airdisaster.com...



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 12:39 AM
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From Reuters:
www.reuters.com...

"At 6:17 a.m. on Dec. 28, three minutes after air traffic control unsuccessfully tried to make contact and asked nearby aircraft to try to locate QZ8501, the A320 turned to the left and it began to climb from its altitude of 32,000 ft (9,750 meters), Jonan told a parliamentary hearing.

The rate of the climb increased rapidly within seconds to 6,000 ft a minute, before accelerating further to 8,400 ft a minute and finally 11,100 ft. The aircraft reached 37,600 ft just 54 seconds after it began to climb before it appeared to stall."

The steep climb happened three minutes AFTER they didn't answer air traffic control.

So there were three minutes before the alleged updraft that the pilots didn't answer?



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