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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 09:54 AM
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From what i have read here 2000 or more flying hours means very little.

Let me explain my thinking.
Considering in some cases a Pilot might only be in control of the aircraft 10 mins during and after take off, and 10 mins before and during landing over a 10 hour flight period with the Auto Pilot doing the rest, that to me would say the Pilot had only twenty minutes flying time under his belt and not the 10 hours logged.

The Pilot could be playing Monopoly for 9 hours 40 minutes with me, does that mean i have 9 hours 40 minutes fly time under my belt also.??
edit on 6-1-2015 by Soloprotocol because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 10:12 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Yes and no. Someone who engages the autopilot at 500 feet on climbout and doesn't disengage it until 500 feet on approach is more than likely going to have less valuable flying time than someone who has the same hours but in an airplane with no automation flying freight in the middle of the night into god knows where.

"2000 or more flying hours means very little" is not true at all though. Even though you may have the autopilot on a lot, there are still things you learn and new situations that come about. An old greybeard Captain with 20,000 hours is way more experienced than the new FO with 2,000 hours.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: justwanttofly
I Understand.Just making a observation.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:03 PM
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originally posted by: [post=18842024]727Sky There will be someone come along and say they have thousands of hours in an airbus with never a problem.. To that I say 'good'... Operators the world over think highly of the aircraft now and some of the aircraft really do have long weight bearing legs... But like I might have already said, " Any machine is no better than the crew up front who know it's quirks".

youtu.be...

Correc. Airbus flies a wee bit different that boeings



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:48 PM
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On sky news last night I heard the weather report for when the plane went down.
They stated that the temperature was as low as -126 degrees???
Is this possible?



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:50 PM
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originally posted by: UKWO1Phot
On sky news last night I heard the weather report for when the plane went down.
They stated that the temperature was as low as -126 degrees???
Is this possible?

In Space Yes. here on Earth i pretty much doubt it.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Yeah that's what I thought. Something like The Day After Tomorrow when the helicopter freezes in Scotland.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 01:59 PM
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originally posted by: UKWO1Phot
a reply to: Soloprotocol

Yeah that's what I thought. Something like The Day After Tomorrow when the helicopter freezes in Scotland.

-60+ is not uncommon at the North and south polar regions. I'm sure even northern Europe, Siberia and the Northern Americas have seen those temps. but -126 is a bit of a stretch.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Just had a google around and found this..



Due to the extremely high tropopause (56,000 ft), cloud tops almost certainly extended to above 50,000 ft. The critical icing layer extends from 17,000 to 23,000 ft, with the -20C layer at 27,000 ft. Flight level temperature was -29C. However as evidenced by Air France 447 incident (temperature at flight level -33C), clear icing can occur in much colder temperature regimes given high levels of water loading in the cloud, and the Air France incident raises questions of whether tropical convection is particularly efficient at bringing supercooled water to higher levels.


From this site:- WeatherSite

So looks like -126 was a definite stretch.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

Flying out of the Philippines, by the time we reached cruising altitude it was -64. That's the average temperature you will see at that altitude, although I've seen as low as -72 when I was paying attention to it.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: UKWO1Phot

With supersaturated freezing rain being found moving around in thunderstorms, that's probably evidence for the pitot tubes freezing leading to bad air data.



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 02:36 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

So I'd assume with the wrong air speed they could easily go into a stall and drop out of the sky?



posted on Jan, 6 2015 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: UKWO1Phot

It would a contributing factor. Not a complete causation in and of itself though.



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 10:25 AM
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It's confirmed that they have found the tail section of the aircraft. They've released a picture that shows an A and an X (registration was PK-AXC), as well as some control mechanisms.



posted on Jan, 7 2015 @ 10:34 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
It's confirmed that they have found the tail section of the aircraft. They've released a picture that shows an A and an X (registration was PK-AXC), as well as some control mechanisms.

Hopefully with the FDR inside.
edit on 7-1-2015 by Soloprotocol because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 9 2015 @ 02:13 AM
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Seem like they are close by:


Santoso Sayogo, an investigator at the National Transportation Safety Committee, said it appeared that the flight recorders were no longer in the tail.

"We received an update from the field that the pinger locator already detected pings," he told Reuters. "We have our fingers crossed it is the black box. Divers need to confirm. Unfortunately it seems it's off from the tail. But the divers need to confirm the position."

The tail was found on Wednesday, upturned on the sea bed about 30 km (20 miles) from the plane's last known location at a depth of around 30 metres.

Source: New Straits Times Online



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 03:08 PM
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The tail section has been lifted but is missing the black boxes as expected. They are believed to be close by based on the location of the pings. The boxes should be found "in a few days".



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 10:32 AM
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"Black-Boxes" Located

A report that the data recorders have been located - but not yet retrieved - under debris on the sea floor. Plans are to attempt recovery on Monday 12th.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 04:16 PM
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To go way back to the ground speed issue, this is how little ground speed actually means.

Supersonic 777

A Boeing 777 crossed the Atlantic in 5 hours and 16 minutes, the fastest crossing by a subsonic aircraft recorded.

According to all the ground speed indicators, the aircraft was flying at 745 mph during the flight. At cruising altitude that would be well north of Mach 1.



posted on Jan, 11 2015 @ 11:08 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Podroom

And that has what to do with anything?


Go figure.




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