It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Missing Plane Air Asia

page: 52
94
<< 49  50  51    53  54  55 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 11:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

Gotta save that infallible pilot reputation.


That's what 4 years of flying around in Asia/Indonesia taught me.
Loss of face is worse than loss of life.


I never adopted that attitude, but stuck to American/European safety level.
Good night and happy new year.

edit on 31-12-2014 by Ivar_Karlsen because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 11:51 AM
link   
a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

And they wonder why there are so many landing accidents.

Happy New Year.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 12:58 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

thank you mr. obvious
since you are the expert here can you tell us how other than visual sighting will they try to find the plane?
Do they have aircraft that are capable of locating the ping?



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 01:19 PM
link   
a reply to: deadeyedick

Nice reply to a serious answer. The water is shallow enough that they WONT have any problem recovering them, as long as they find the fuselage wreckage.

No aircraft can detect the ping except an ASW plane. Even they will have trouble hearing them unless the drop sonobouys on top of them.

A MAD system can detect any magnetic changes by a large mass of metal, and an RPV can detect it as well.

edit on 12/31/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 01:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: deadeyedick
a reply to: Zaphod58

thank you mr. obvious
since you are the expert here can you tell us how other than visual sighting will they try to find the plane?
Do they have aircraft that are capable of locating the ping?


Wow. Moved on from dumping on people stating the obvious to dumping on people responding politely I see. Nice. I know, I know, there's just gotta be a conspiracy here somewhere, right?



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 01:21 PM
link   
Have they considered using submarines to try and locate the wreckage and flight data recorder?



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 01:22 PM
link   
a reply to: MystikMushroom

Subs have problems in that area because of the depth.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:02 PM
link   

"Until now, we haven't found the plane," Bambang Soelistyo said, according to Indonesia's national news agency Antara. "We've only found seven bodies to this day."


sonar may have detected airasia flight



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58

thanks for going more in depth
I did not mean to disrespect you or hurt your feelings
i did not know pilots were so sensitive i thought that was just lawyers



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:12 PM
link   
a reply to: jaffo

if it turns out the recordings show that no permission was givin to change coarse then yes there is something there.
It could be that a cover up was underway by the controller.
There will be a reason that false info was givin and not wanting to be responsible for a plane crash is a good reason to lie about the permission. Any reporter worth their salt would get clairifaction on the recordings. Were they lied to?



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: auroraaus

Clouds create vertigo. Vertigo is fun, and dangerous as hell.

Here's a fun experiment we used to do to demonstrate it.

Take a broom stick and cut it down to a comfortable length. Tape it to the foot rest of an office type chair (make sure it's one that has a bar type footrest).

Put a blindfold on that you can't see through on, and have someone spin you 8-10 times then stop you. Once you stop, keep the "stick" centered for 30 seconds. At the end of that time freeze exactly where you are and take the blindfold off.

That's vertigo.

Simple explanation is that with no outside references your body loses the ability to tell up from down. An experienced instrument pilot SHOULD know better than to look outside, but it's bitten many pilots in the ass over the years. We used to have a requirement that without a waver, all fighters on ferry flights had to be on the ground before local dark.

They only had one person on board, so there was no one to check them if they started to lose the plot, and they weren't familiar with the place they were landing so were more susceptible.

There are other possible causes, but that is one.


That could be one explanation about the latest data from radar, they said the aircraft pitched up to an unbelievable amount (probably stalling and falling off to the side and went into a spin unrecoverable and dropping off the radar) if avionics failed you might (due to a shear) 'feel' you are dropping (or perhaps it did 'drop') causing pilot to pull the stick (wheel) into his stomach causing a stall, I know the stall warning is hard to ignore with a 'shaker' alarm (shakes the control wheel along with a alarm and lights) that only an unconscious person could ignore. I did 'find' a hole in a storm that felt like the bottom of the atmosphere fell out and actually slammed hard when we 'hit' the 'bottom'!
Of course these scenarios I am spewing are all conjecture as I don't know what happened, I just know sometimes the atmosphere will do incredible things that scare the heck out of ya!



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 02:33 PM
link   
a reply to: zazzafrazz

This is what I was talking about with runaway expansion. Lion Air started in 99, and has 500 aircraft between active and on order (65 on order). They lost a brand new 737-800 last year in a non-fatal crash on landing. The NTSC called for more monitoring of training, and crew resource management procedures. The crew lost situational awareness on final.

AirAsia has 169 aircraft flying, and just over 300 on order. And this is for an airline that has had to postpone orders and cancel codeshare agreements because they are having trouble breaking into markets.
edit on 12/31/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 05:04 PM
link   
Sonar has identified what appears to be large pieces of wreckage, but some pieces have been moved over 30 miles by strong currents in the area.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 05:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Zaphod58



What I said is that there are times that there is a minor mechanical problem, but the PASSENGERS are told it's weather related to avoid compensation issues. I used to work closely with several airlines and heard from a few people they did it.


That must have changed since my time...thanks for the update.. Most people do not realize that some very high number of delays (80% in my day) are because of the FAA and their antiquated ATC system. It is very frustrating to pull on a runway ready for takeoff only to be told ATC cannot release the flight due to traffic.. Clear blue and 92 on the vis with a 45 minute flight and due to traffic build up they hold you on the ground. Or enroute to your destination they slow you down to a crawl when you are still 1000 nm from you destination.. Very frustrating for everyone especially for connecting passengers..

Also congrats on the info you have given in this thread and putting up with having to answer the same thing several times.. salute



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 06:40 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

They desperately need to pass an actual budget for the FAA. I'm surprised the system has lasted as long as it has honestly.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 07:51 PM
link   
a reply to: 727Sky

It depends where you are flying perhaps. I have had to wait while four guys with a flashlight and scaffolding tended to the "Weather" hanging off the wing of a scheduled flight.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 08:19 PM
link   
In the news - improved weather in the area which should be able to help divers and recovery operations. I also read this morning (Can't remember where, 1 coffee so far of 2015) that some debris and victims have drifted more than 50kms since last located, I suppose those huge waves wouldn't of helped. There's a lookout now on the beaches of Kalimantan for things to wash ashore.

Hoping today is the day we get most, if not all, of the passengers out of the sea.



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 09:08 PM
link   
a reply to: Ivar_Karlsen

Real men blame it on the FO!



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 09:13 PM
link   

I know the stall warning is hard to ignore with a 'shaker' alarm (shakes the control wheel along with a alarm and lights) that only an unconscious person could ignore.


Stick shakers are so hard to ignore, but there have been numerous instances of pilots still continuing to stall the airplane after the shaker activated due to numerous factors. I'm with you, I don't know how you don't react to a stick shaker, no matter how fatigued or in over your head you are flying the plane.
edit on 31-12-2014 by justwanttofly because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 31 2014 @ 09:33 PM
link   
A few people with experience in aviation have made good comments in this thread about flying through thunderstorms, but most people don't know how bad it really is. This video gives a good illustration of things discussed in this thread, like thunderstorm navigation, how easy it is to become disoriented if you aren't on the ball, and how bad it can really get(thunderstorms can get worse than this, but this one is pretty bad).





top topics



 
94
<< 49  50  51    53  54  55 >>

log in

join