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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

Weather, turbulence, or several other reasons.




posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: randyvs

But that would pose the same issues surely? You have to understand that if it were that simple, they could just GPRS locate the phones of passengers on board, or the wifi system of the plane itself. It is not that simple because no one will be in cell range, and one would assume that the wifi connection is dead also!

Now personally, I think it is high time that some sort of alternative method were construed by the air industry to physically track every plane that goes into the air, one hundred percent of the time, to within a millimetre of its location when it goes down, blows up, or lands. But that sort of technology just does not exist at the moment as far as I am aware!



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:50 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Thanks for response but i will have to backtrack and look at the other missing plane this year,i heard there was a signature given off from the engines that told a story of where the plane was,altitude speed and possibly GPS at the time they stopped giving off the signature..but i could well be wrong so that's what i based my assumption on.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

ADS-B transponders. They're supposed to be on all aircraft by 2020, although they're pushing for an extension due to production issues.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaphod,

For completeness sake, would you mind expanding on the difference between the current system, and the ADS-B system you mentioned?



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

For overwater flights one of the first things crews are trained to do after encountering an emergency is to turn 90 degrees abeam their airway, so that can be added to the list too.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:56 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
According to the CAAS, they were scheduled to arrive at 0830 local. The Singapore Navy and two C-130s are on standby to assist if requested.


I think now would be a good time to get them up. Why wait?
Yeakeepwatchingme... yes I hope for a fast resolve.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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Plane is believed to have been over the Java Sea between Kalimantan and Java islands when contact was lost. Was at 32,000 feet at the time. Contact was lost 42 minutes after takeoff.
twitter feed if anyone wants it>



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: randyvs

But that would pose the same issues surely? You have to understand that if it were that simple, they could just GPRS locate the phones of passengers on board, or the wifi system of the plane itself.


Response of Bigburgh:
If the planes power is out. No wifi.
There are no cell phone towers at sea..
But I like where you're going.

edit on 27-12-2014 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:59 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

The current system relies on location reports from the crew, as they get to waypoints. That's the only time they're required to report in.

An ADS-B transponder sends out a signal over a set time (say every five minutes) reporting their position automatically. It also sends a signal to any aircraft that has a receiver, so they're aware of the location and can avoid them if necessary.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 10:59 PM
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translated from CNN arabic... when did CNN go Arabic?

arabic.cnn.com

Asia" company in the Indonesian government on Sunday, losing contact one of the company's passenger aircraft, during a flight from Indonesia to Singapore.

An official at the crisis center of the company, in the "Juanda" International Airport, on the island of "Surabaya" in Indonesia, for CNN : "The loss of communication between the flight number 8501 and the control tower in Jakarta, and we do not have any additional information."

The same source continued: "It has been the formation of an operations center to manage the crisis, and we are working at the moment in order to get more information."

According to the flight schedule, the plane left the Juanda Airport at 5:27 Sunday morning, and was due to arrive in Singapore at 8:37 this morning from the same time, was the loss of contact time 7:24.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:00 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

Bigburgh,

If they send up a big old plane like that before they have even the slightest idea exactly where and what to look for, then there is a chance that it will spend most of its time just circling waiting for data. If they wait till they have something concrete for it to aim at location wise, that maximises the amount of useful time it can spend in the air, actively involved in any effort to aid or recover plane and passengers.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

Just waiting for an official request. Takes a little while.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: Bigburgh

Yeah mate i personally found it...it was next to Lord Lucan all the time.
You might look there next time your keys are missing.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Ah I see. No advantage there then. And many thanks for
the response True.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:03 PM
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News conference about to start at Surabaya airport. Airport officials, @AirAsia spokespeople, Basarnas, and air force will address.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Why is it that a system cannot be devised to report the planes position in real time, i.e. every five seconds, or one second for that matter? Just curious, since a plane can travel a significant distance in five minutes, it makes more sense to have the window between reports as tiny or non existent as possible!
edit on 27-12-2014 by TrueBrit because: Better word choice



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

ADS-B can report at any interval they want. I just picked five minutes at random. The only thing is that a busy airspace like Chicago or Atlanta risks bring swamped with data if they report too often during peak times.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Its a shame that some sort of distributed system cannot be devised to handle excessive data inload to that sort of system, perhaps using processing power from other ATCs systems to handle the spares during peak times for busy hubs.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:10 PM
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originally posted by: southbeach
a reply to: Bigburgh

Yeah mate i personally found it...it was next to Lord Lucan all the time.
You might look there next time your keys are missing.


Gotcha..


Saw you were trying to find the missing to date airliner..
Star!
TrueBrit.. my thought was bouncing feeds of aircraft off others at all times.. Zaphod pointed it out..
Where there's one aircraft.. there are more..
Bounce the radar.
Submarines do it..put it in real time..
So when someone disappears .. it was an up to the moment play by play..

edit on 27-12-2014 by Bigburgh because: (no reason given)




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