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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:28 PM
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You mentioned ground speed. If you don't like it then don't say it.


originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: theabsolutetruth

Oh my god! You're right! I've totally ignored everything but ground speed! Thank you for once again showing me the error of my ways!




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:30 PM
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Actually, they requested a higher altitude, which would indicate trying to overfly thunderstorms, which are very common in the Intertropical Convergence Zone, an area of persistent convective activity. They were already at 38,000 so they couldn't go much higher. The normal service ceiling for the A320-200 is 13,000 m, although there is a mod on some serial numbers that allows 41,000 feet.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:32 PM
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I'm having a bad feeling that this might end up like mh370 with no wreckage of the plane. My question is why doesn't the pilot send out a distress call or anything. knowing that he is flying in extremely bad weather, he should at least be ready for any type of emergency.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: MRuss

Good idea. You know that got me thinking what if they could make an external black box that is tied into the cockpit. When a plane gets in serious trouble the pilot or co pilot could eject the box. The box could float and have a parachute. I dont know just brainstorming. Such a shame.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:45 PM
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Because I'm real sick of people showing their idiocy time & again in this thread, I suggest this:

Drop your damn smartphone over a boat's side in the middle of the Atlantic. See if you EVER find it again, tracker signal or no signal.

Not gonna happen. Now cram it. Finding submerged electronic stuff isn't that easy, and Zaphod keeps explaining WHY it isn't. If you can drop your phone overboard on a boat and lose it forever, despite your best complaints of "we canz track itz! find eeeet!" then how is it so hard to fathom that something else that broadcasts a signal can also be buried under miles of sea, water being something that severely limits the broadcast range (think of it as a dampening field of natural sorts) and also considering that such a broadcast will eventually cease within a certain time frame as well?

Use your brains people. Has common sense & basic science completely died?



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:50 PM
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a reply to: takers888

The lack of a distress call can be indicative of a quickly deteriorating situation in the cockpit and/or a breakdown in CRM like has been mentioned earlier. There was no distress call on AF447 which exemplified both of the above.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: justwanttofly
a reply to: takers888

The lack of a distress call can be indicative of a quickly deteriorating situation in the cockpit and/or a breakdown in CRM like has been mentioned earlier. There was no distress call on AF447 which exemplified both of the above.



I agree. Just as with the previous missing plane, it's entirely possible that damage prevented any communications or further signals being sent. In that instance, it's suspected an electrical fire took out the communications and plausibly led to the deaths of those on board before the plane eventually ran out of fuel and ditched. In this case, it's plausible that they hit really bad weather, damage to the plane caused loss of systems, including communications, and they also ditched.

This is the most plausible and most likely explanation for what has happened, and I would expect the relevant authorities are probably working to this assumption unless other evidence has been found to suggest anything else.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: takers888
I'm having a bad feeling that this might end up like mh370 with no wreckage of the plane. My question is why doesn't the pilot send out a distress call or anything. knowing that he is flying in extremely bad weather, he should at least be ready for any type of emergency.


If this ends up like MH370 we need to start worrying.


+1 more 
posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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I find it rather amazing that people are grinding Zaphod's gears over this ground speed thing. The ability to keep an aircraft flying is never measured in ground speed. It is the airspeed over the surface of the wings. Zaphod knows this, professional air traffic control people know this. He was trying to make that clear, and I think it was crystal. The person(s) who referenced ground speed in the context of determining if the aircraft was flying to slow was in error of terminology. Cut and dry.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: TheGoondockSaint

originally posted by: takers888
I'm having a bad feeling that this might end up like mh370 with no wreckage of the plane. My question is why doesn't the pilot send out a distress call or anything. knowing that he is flying in extremely bad weather, he should at least be ready for any type of emergency.


If this ends up like MH370 we need to start worrying.


I think I would agree, the circumstances of MH370 were and are bizarre, a terrifying collection of events that led to one of the biggest mysteries we are ever likely to see in our lifetimes. If the same thing happens again, it would be reasonable to assume that these were not accidents and there is something bigger happening.

Probability would dictate that this plane will be found, there will probably be a lot of wreckage on the surface leading to where the plane now is, deep below. If they don't find any evidence of the plane, and we see technical data evidence suggesting the plane continued on, we will all have cause to be far more concerned.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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Blackboxes aren't very reliable when incidents happen over sea, they aren't much good when they get into the wrong hands either.

A real-time data feed of all flight systems will be an inevitable installation for commercial airlines in the near future. I'm sure they'll be a lot of infrastructure and data transparency concerns to iron out but this has to happen at some point.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:18 PM
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This is just creepy. Shouldn't these flight numbers be taken out of use following an incident?




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves

Accident flight numbers are usually retired. Not all the time though.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:37 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

I'm sensing a pattern in the commercial airline industry. Or rather a lack thereof.

'Not all the time though...'

Thanks for the reply. It seems taking the number even temporarily out of service would avoid communications confusion since the plane is still missing. (Insert whatever smiley is the eyeroll now here)






posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves

Asiana did the same thing last year. It took them like a month to retire the flight number 214.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:00 PM
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a reply to: TheGoondockSaint

If this plane does end up like mh370 than there is a deeper force that we can't control which make planes disappear and get shot down that has to do with anything that relates to Malaysia. I say FOLLOW the money!
edit on 28-12-2014 by takers888 because: (no reason given)

edit on 28-12-2014 by takers888 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: DancedWithWolves

There might be a month of tickets already booked for that flight number, imagine the chaos for passengers if they changed the number straight away.


edit on 28/12/14 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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Well this really sucks, not a lot of talk about this airliner like there was for MH



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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a reply to: Nyiah

Whilst I agree with your post, I recall the Java sea is not actually all that deep compared to others. And I believe it's a bit mapped out underwater too, given the interest of salvage divers over the past 50 -60 years.

Will look for sources to back up my hazy memory.

Edit:


Even though not much is known about Java Sea in terms of tourism, it is in fact a large sea, made of shallow waters. The average depth of water in this sea is 151 feet that runs across its entire sprawl. It covers a large area of about 320,000 square kilometers on the Sunda shelf.

From - Marine Insight

A shallow sea, it has a mean depth of 151 feet (46 metres). The almost uniform flatness of the sea bottom and the presence of drainage channels (traceable to the mouths of island rivers) indicate that the Sunda Shelf was once a stable, dry, low-relief land area.... From September through May surface currents in the sea flow west. For the rest of the year they trend eastward.

From - Encyclopedia Britannica


Just pointing out the depth in this case. Not having a go.
edit on 28-12-2014 by auroraaus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: Zaphod58

Why is it that a system cannot be devised to report the planes position in real time, i.e. every five seconds, or one second for that matter? Just curious, since a plane can travel a significant distance in five minutes, it makes more sense to have the window between reports as tiny or non existent as possible!


Such a system, or at least the components, already exists.You could take an inertial navigation system and mate it to multiple automatic burst broadcast radios, including VHF, UHF and HF. basic Sperry ring laser gyro INS costs about $300,000. The radio setup would be another $100,000. According to IATA, there are 13,000 airliners in service, so the aircraft equipment cost alone would be 5:.2 billion dollars. Now consider the cost of building and staffing on a 24/7/365 basis the worlwide ground receiving stations.It would add trillions of dollars to aggregate ticket costs. And it gives me, the pilot, one more very complex system to operate and monitor. I already have multiple hundreds of switches, gauges, circuit breakers, annunciator lights and FMC pages to keep track of. And it's one more bunch of raging elecrons to catch fire, or delay a departure, or cause a diversion.




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