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Missing Plane Air Asia

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

i agree,

but how many of them have completely lost an aircraft, and it has never been seen since, and the recent one, has also completely vanished (unless they have found the debris field in the last few minutes)

i feel for the families, heck my sister is using this airline in a few months for her diving trip to Malaysia! all i'm saying is in the last 12 months this country have almost started a war, and done the impossible lost a modern aircraft




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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Satellite tech is good enough to find this airplane. They are watching every single thing that happens on this place we call earth. They know were this plane is.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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a reply to: openminded2011

I doubt the validity of that assertion that the computer would crash as a result of some turbulence. One of the many weird facets of Airbus aircraft is how they handle turbulence and crosswinds when flying manually, but the whole system crashing seems extreme.

Flying through the heart of a well developed thunderstorm is known as one of the quickest ways in aviation to go meet your maker.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Planclength
Satellite tech is good enough to find this airplane. They are watching every single thing that happens on this place we call earth. They know were this plane is.



Like many in this thread, you underestimate the size of the planet and the vast number of commercial flights in the air at any one time.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: zazzafrazz

TBH after the fiasco the Comet I was I'm surprised the jet age unfolded as it did.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

You have no idea what the hell you are talking about. I am aware of a number of black projects that you don't know exist.

There is at least one experienced 777 pilot on ATS that will say the same thing. So apparently he doesn't know what he's talking about either, but you, with no aviation experience knows more than he and I. Sure you do.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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Someone mentioned a number of pages back that the US military doesn't have a need to track commercial planes. I think this would be one of there #1 priorities :

1. They need to stop 9/11 type attacks. Even if the US wasn't interested in this area you can bet China cares.
2. They need to distinguish between commercial airliners, military jets, and long range missile. How in the world would they know if that thing flying over the ocean was a jet or a bomb?
3. There's ships and bases all over the world - a target could be on it's way to a ship or base.
4.. There's a group that feels the US and other countries would just wait until the object came within regular radar range - this may not be enough time to take out the threat plus they would rather take it down over the ocean.

GPS systems cost about 50 bucks. I don't believe it for a second they don't have a way to track planes.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:18 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

This will be my last reply for today.

The comment I replied to deserves 1000 stars. On point thank you for this!


edit on 28-12-2014 by Eagleyedobserver because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

So they're putting trackers in bombs and missiles too? Whoa they really ARE all powerful!

It's called Over The Horizon Radar. Many countries have them. They are capable of tracking several thousand miles by bouncing a radar beam off the ionosphere. The drawbacks are that they can't track at close range and if the ionosphere is active their signal is degraded. They're also extremely large.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

a couple of interesting facts from this article

www.nytimes.com...

The route was a well-traveled part of the Indonesian archipelago; six other aircraft were in the vicinity of Flight QZ8501 when it disappeared according to data by Flightradar24, an organization that tracks aircraft.

Mr. Djoko said the authorities had not detected any emergency distress beacons that are normally triggered by an accident.

7 minute difference in timeline when they lost contact

“At the moment, we don’t know where the exact location is, except that this morning at 6:17, we lost contact,” Mr. Djoko said. The Singapore authorities said contact was lost at 6:24 a.m. Jakarta time; the discrepancy has not been explained.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Back then there were more design issues hence the higher rate of incidents.

The fact that 2014 had less than average incidents makes the probability of 3 of them being Malaysian airlines of such a mysterious / serious nature even more statistically unlikely.

Pitot tubes are a possibility as are other factors.

That has no bearing however on the fact there could have been foul play, either from pilot / ATC error, deliberate act of a pilot / person accessing controls or other nefarious interaction.

The weather situation occurs there often, it could have been seen as an apt excuse or opportune moment.

The fact is there are many possibilities and foul play cannot be ruled out of the equation as it stands.
edit on 28-12-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: research100

I saw earlier there was a discrepancy between when FR24 lost them, and the time they lost contact. I'm not really surprised by that honestly.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

No, it can't be yet. Nothing can be ruled out yet.

I wouldn't exactly call 1984 "back then" though with regards to the previous accidents.

With regards to Malaysia, they're caught in the aviation boom. Training, maintenance and crew coordination have all suffered in parts of Asia because of it and it will take years to recover.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:37 PM
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a reply to: Daughter2

They say that though they probably do.

The fact that a UK based organisation tracked MH370 despite the fact it hadn't subscribed to it's full service is proof that they can if they want to.

IMO there as likely far more information known about these 'missing' airlines than MSM is being told. There will be letter agencies with information for sure.

That said, there should be proper accessible tracking for all air traffic, commercial and otherwise, the fact that there reportedly ''isn't'' is perhaps a convenient excuse for ''those that like to disappear people on planes / planes''.
edit on 28-12-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:39 PM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

Not all aircraft are equipped with the EHMS that was used though. All newer aircraft are, but there are plenty of older aircraft that aren't, and won't be still.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

There are other ways of tracking.

Additionally there will be plenty of intel on the crew / passengers/ airline owners / their enemies that is not as yet being released.

The current satellites have excellent coverage and soon will offer complete and free 'missing' plane searches.

gigaom.com...


When Iridium’s new satellites will start blasting into orbit next year on top of SpaceX and Dnepr rockets, they’ll be carrying a special payload: an aircraft tracking system that will be able to locate a plane anywhere in the world once Iridium’s 66-satellite constellation is fully operational in 2017.

The service is run by Aireon, a joint venture between Iridium and government aviation agencies in Canada and Europe, and it plans on charging airlines for its core flight monitoring services. But Aireon said it would open the network up gratis to international rescue agencies during emergencies, allowing them to home in on missing aircraft.


In the case of Malaysia Airlines 370, which disappeared in March, the emergency service could have helped in locating and the possible rescue of the still-missing flight by plotting its exact GPS coordinates every few seconds. The technology behind it is called Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B), and transponders using it are being installed in new and old commercial aircraft.

Iridium birds won’t be the only ones listening for ADS-B signals either, both Inmarsat and Globalstar are putting the locator tech on their aircraft and will be offering competing flight monitoring services. Iridium, however, has the slight advantage of offering pole-to-pole coverage, which given the artic great circle routes taken by many transcontinental flights, would be very handy.

edit on 28-12-2014 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth

There are, but all require the addition of equipment. The easiest will be the ADS transponders that will be required soon.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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My own Mum,Sister,Brother in law,and niece,have all flown that route a few times over the last few years.
My heart goes out to the families of the missing people.

The weird text messages-what the heck is that about?
Who would do that,and why?
Two missing planes have had the weird text messages.
That needs to be investigated IMO.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:51 PM
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Another missing plane?? I wonder if they will blame NK for this like they do for everything else.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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originally posted by: Planclength
Satellite tech is good enough to find this airplane. They are watching every single thing that happens on this place we call earth. They know were this plane is.


There are only so many eyes in the sky and they cant look at everything at the same time. Although I am not entierly sure now, how much zoomed in would a sattelite have to be to make out the speck of a plane?




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