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Canada to acquire fifth C-17

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posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 09:45 PM
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Canada has announced plans to acquire a fifth C-17 to add to their fleet (the RCAF refers to them as CC-177 Globemasters). This will allow for one aircraft to be available while the others go through PDM checks. With four aircraft acquired over two years, and PDM required every five years (a five month process), it's possible for all four aircraft to be in PDM at the same time.

Boeing currently has 10 aircraft on the production line, which closes next year, that are being built without customers. One other aircraft has been bought by an unknown customer, leaving eight aircraft, known as white tails. The last aircraft will undergo wing/body join early in 2015. Australia has been named as a potential customer for at least one more aircraft.


Canada officially has plans to purchase a fifth Boeing C-17 strategic airlifter, a move that will extend the overall service life of the fleet by at least seven years.

The announcement was made on 19 December by Canadian Defence Minister Rob Nicholson during a visit to Canadian Forces Base Trenton, Ontario.

“It’s no exaggeration to say that the C-17 fleet has revolutionised the way that Canadian forces operate,” Nicholson says. “Without these aircraft, we would be force to contract airlift services or hitch rides with our allies. Instead we are in a position to help our allies when required.”

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Is there any speculation as to who might pick up the remaining 8 airframes? By process of elimination it seems like the only potential customers might be the RAF and the middle eastern customers.
edit on 26-12-2014 by justwanttofly because: 7 is not 8



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

There are 8 available, but Australia is the only potential customer named. NATO has talked about getting at least a couple airframes to be shared among countries as necessary, Qatar is a potential customer, as is India.



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 10:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I saw that NATO is going to see if they can make a deal with Airbus for some tankers that also helped out with their strat airlift needs, so they might even be out. Forgot about India.



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 10:15 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Was not the Australian government hinting at the purchase of 2 more of these aircraft .




It is understood that several countries, including some oil rich Middle Eastern nations, have expressed strong interest in purchasing the last of what is fast becoming a legend of the skies.
“Australia has requested pricing information but no order has been received,” a well-placed industry source said.



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 10:20 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

Poland, Norway, and the Netherlands are looking at a four tanker deal for A330MRTT airframes.



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 10:21 PM
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a reply to: hutch622

Yeah, it was going around a few months ago that they were looking at at least two more. They love the ones that they already have.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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If the late PM John Diefenbaker didn't kill the Avro Arrow program in the early 60's, Canada would never have to rely on U.S./Boeing for air military technology.

Canada would like have been the world leader in jet manufacturing and we'd still have our Healthcare.
edit on 27-12-2014 by RossWellOldMexico because: added point to reply.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 09:16 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
...and PDM required every five years (a five month process)...


I had no idea it was a 5 month downtime every 5 years.

The government and military in Canada are absolutely over the moon happy with those planes. They have called it a game changer for the Canadian military expanding their capabilities exponentially. Of course the country had no heavy lift before the acquisition and hired Antonov's a bit too regularly.

Now if Canada can just stop the politics and buy the F 35 the country will be on the right path...somewhat...



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 09:19 AM
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originally posted by: RossWellOldMexico
If the late PM John Diefenbaker didn't kill the Avro Arrow program in the early 60's, Canada would never have to rely on U.S./Boeing for air military technology.

Canada would like have been the world leader in jet manufacturing and we'd still have our Healthcare.



Canada didn't have the military mindset to maintain an air superiority fighter producer.

To support a martial industry, you have to have a martial society.

The polite Canadian workforce in Malton Ontario were oblivious to the Russian infiltration at AVRO that was stealing the technology and nullifying the advantages the Arrow had over everybody else.

Yeah we could have been the builders of our own weapons of mass destruction, if we'd wanted to militarize our society to the same level as the US.

Vive la difference.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: noeltrotsky

They go as far as removing skin to check for corrosion. The -135s could take longer. They'd even remove the wings.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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Zaph,

Slightly off topic but do you know if there were ever any efforts by AFSOC/SOCOM to acquire an MC-17 variant of the C-17? I know there are the SOLL II birds but those aren't owned or operated by SOCOM and buying up some of those remaining airframes would give them some heavier and faster lift capabilities as well as help them recap their tac airlift fleet which they are so keen on doing.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 01:08 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

There was talk off and on about it. I think they finally decided they were too big and expensive for a dedicated platform, so they have crews trained to fly the missions.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 01:21 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks, that's what I figured.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

It's always interesting to be driving up in Washington, and see a C-17 pop up from behind a hill in the distance.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 02:07 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah I bet. I've heard stories of IPs doing low levels with the mission of popping the rollers/rails out from the cargo hold floor.

I wish I could've been around to see one of those SOLL II C-5s do their thing.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 02:14 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

I have a ton of Dash Ones, including those. It makes for interesting reading. You don't picture a C-5 going low.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Did they do airland too or just airdrop? I can imagine them doing an assault landing and the mission stalling because there is now a broke ass C-5 sitting there unable to leave.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: justwanttofly

Just drops. C-5s and unprepared fields don't play well together.



posted on Dec, 27 2014 @ 05:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Hi Zaph,
From what I have read C-17's don't actually undergo PDM, they are given rolling block upgrades under the GRIP program. Regardless I find it difficult to believe that it takes 5 months to perform a heavy maintenance/mod program. Commercially speaking that would be unacceptable. I have personally been involved in heavy maintenance on both civil and a few military aircraft and it never takes more than about 40 days. And that included such things as Section 41 rebuilds on 747's which is no small job, strut/pylon removal and repair due to corrosion, major flying surfaces and fuel tank entry. Even a large check on an A-330 which includes removal of the vertical stab every few heavy checks wont exceed 35 days max. Typically these days airlines try not to exceed 28 days. I find it puzzling that given the relatively low number of cycles and hours even military transports gain (typically a fraction of their commercial cousins) that they need a heavy type check every 5 years when commercially its now generally 7-8 years and some types like the A-380 don't even have D checks scheduled just a C check every couple of years. It concerns me that while some of it may be legitimate work, I have personally observed gouging of military customers for work that should have been done much quicker and much cheaper. In addition I wonder if some of the work and inspections is using outdated practices long since superseded commercially?

LEE.



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