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Large Black Cat Photographed in Australian Bush

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posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 11:43 PM
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Sorry for posting and running.

I literally saw it, thought I'd share with ATS and left.

One correction, it's not from a go pro it's from a trail cam apparently.

I've asked for the original as well.

I see what some are saying about the shadows.

Thanks for all the replies so far!




posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: radarloveguy

i am heading to Fraser island in the next month or so ...i will have to keep my eyes peeled for the critter



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 12:21 AM
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a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Umm, definitely not land locked, largest Island Continent ...

There have been many reports of large black cat sightings near Lithgow N.S.W. as well.
Again US servicemen have been given credit, due to them bringing pumas to Australia and this part of N.S.W. specifically -
while they were building concrete roads during WW2.

Many reported sightings - few grainy pics - none captured or killed to my knowledge.

A previous poster mentioned Fraser Island. ( plenty of wild dingoes )
He mentioned seeing the panther on his way North after leaving Fraser.

There could be some truth in the big cat mystery, it could also be an urban myth ...




ED: I have just been informed that Victoria has had it's fair share of anecdotal sightings too.
edit on 23-12-2014 by Timely because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 12:25 AM
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originally posted by: cuckooold
a reply to: Chadwickus

This was seen near Bunbury?

I'm in Perth, but later in the week I am heading down to Collie, so potentially in the neighbourhood for a big cat.

/edit

I found this

en.m.wikipedia.org...


The premise that there were cougars in Western Australia was widely believed during the 1970s.

There are several theories as to how they were introduced. The most popular theory was that United States servicemen brought four cougar kittens to Western Australia during World War II; they eventually grew too big for captivity and were released—two at Fremantle and two at Bunbury. Another theory is that cougars escaped from a traveling circus that was involved in an accident between Bridgetown and Nannup around 1961. The circus theory has often been referenced to support the allegation that cougars were responsible for the deaths of around 2000 sheep in the Duranillin area in the late 1970s.


One of these days we need to form a Perth ATS subsection so we can go investigate these things as a group...

And so I can collect all your infos and send them orf to the nsas and make myself trillions in cyber currency.. I mean, so we can actually get to know each other..

lots of perthies here.

All to skeered to say "OI, YOU. ATS GUY. Howyagarn!?" lol



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 12:33 AM
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originally posted by: Timely
a reply to: Subaeruginosa

Umm, definitely not land locked, largest Island Continent ...


Yeah sorry, slip of the tongue. I meant to say water-locked, obviously. Isolated for millions of years so we have evolved some very unique fauna, but lack the majority of animals that are common in the rest of the world.

The area around Fraser is actually fairly developed. So I don't know, a cocky feral cat maybe that just seemed larger than it was at the time?



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 02:18 AM
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Although the image to me looks more like a domestic cat I certainly don't think it is a stretch that non-indigenous large cats could be lurking around, especially in that habitat. The world is rife with exotic animal trade and there are many an irresponsible owner who have lost or set free their animals.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

Might be a false flag operation to distract us from the Yowie hiding behind the trees...hmmmm?

Gotta say I'm fairly dubious about the quality and the seemingly unusual shadow underneath the cat. Memories of Bunbury might have gotten pranked. Fingers crossed you can get a hold of a better version of the image to settle it.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 03:19 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

I have relatives from just a little further to the south who live on the edge of the forest who can tell stoires about these creatures all day long.

On a related note, for those interested, look up video on youtube and search on 'Thyacinine' or 'Sid Slee', you wil find it interesting.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 03:58 AM
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originally posted by: learnatic
a reply to: Chadwickus
On a related note, for those interested, look up video on youtube and search on 'Thyacinine' or 'Sid Slee', you wil find it interesting.


Oh no you just didn't, like seriously, you didn't just do that!

I am just dying for some one to provide me with some evidence that the Thylacine is still roaming around out there. I would give my left arm just to see some undisputed evidence, what an amazing animal!!!!!

edit on 23-12-2014 by Subaeruginosa because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 05:41 AM
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a reply to: learnatic

Really ? A Tasmanian Tiger in W.A. ?

Too much Swan lager methinks.




posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: Timely

There's been persistent rumours about a "Nannup tiger" for decades. It's said to resemble a thylacine.

A lot of the older folk that live on the rural properties all through the southwest will usually have a yarn to tell you, some go as far as to say there's a cover up by local government entities like the ranger, and parks and wildlife etc etc.

It's intrigued me for years and I've been on and off the fence several times now lol..


edit on 23/12/14 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

First I've heard of this one mate ... lol.

But - hey we are an Island, albeit a bloody big one - with bugger all between major centres.

The big cat witness is fairly much country wide .

This is the first I have heard of thylacine reports - what, 60-70 yrs. after extinction pronouncement ...

That; surely deserves a thread of its own ...

Next thing will be Darwinites speaking of crocs gorging on thylacines.

( A tassie tiger took my baby ! )

Sorry for the brevity ... my head just survived a near explosion !

edit on 23-12-2014 by Timely because: spelling atrocity ...



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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a reply to: Chadwickus

Looks like a felis catus. There well could be large exotic cats roaming some areas of Oz (illegal trade/escapees), but this just looks like a moggy.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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Looks like an over exposed photo, hence why there's not many shadows.

a reply to: CraftBuilder
A very large domestic cat... look how close it is to the nearest tree above the shoulder. Not as big as a panther, looks more like the size of a lynx or bobcat.

a reply to: Bigburgh
The tail is coming down and following the back right leg, you can see the tip of the tail coming out off where the ankle is.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 10:41 AM
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I've seen two big black cats in the last few years. First one was when me and a couple of mates were shooting pigs out near Nindigully. We worked out It stood about 80cms from Foot to shoulder. Took a couple of shots with our 223''s at it, one of them connected but it buggered off through the scrub and we didn't see it again for the week we were on the property.

The next time was when me and the missus at the time were traveling the back way home from the Sunshine coast along the Brisbane valley highway. It was siting on the side of the road just outside of Esk, presumably eating road kill. I had a 94 Pajero at the time with a 2 inch lift under it, and its head came just over the bottom of the passenger window . Off memory it worked out to be about 1.3 metres. I chucked a u-ey to check it out but it must've disappeared into the paddock along the road.
edit on 23-12-2014 by recorrit because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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To me, going by perceived size, ear size and shape, and the apparent lack of a tail/very small tail that looks like a Bobcat. I've seen a few in person and that sure looks like one. Although I don't know that I've ever heard of a black one.
edit on 12 23 2014 by MDpvc because: Put link in the wrong place



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: Chadwickus
a reply to: Timely

...., some go as far as to say there's a cover up by local government entities like the ranger, and parks and wildlife etc etc.


H.I.T.S. (Head In The Sand) is a policy of those Govt departments, the local Fisheries department were in complete denial about mud crabs being in the Australind Estuary system ( approx 1500km south of their normal warm water habitat) for several years until photos of very large specimans featured in the local papers.



posted on Dec, 24 2014 @ 12:48 AM
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originally posted by: SalientSkivvy
Looks like an over exposed photo, hence why there's not many shadows.

a reply to: CraftBuilder
A very large domestic cat... look how close it is to the nearest tree above the shoulder. Not as big as a panther, looks more like the size of a lynx or bobcat.

a reply to: Bigburgh
The tail is coming down and following the back right leg, you can see the tip of the tail coming out off where the ankle is.


I agree with your first sense. It is way overexposed.. I see enough shadows to think it's a real picture.

The cat in question is bigger than some people are thinking.. The tree to the direct front that splits into two?

You cannot wrap your hand around that tree. Maybe if you have bigger hands than me. The cat is like 60 lbs...

The tail coming down and following the back leg.. Yep. Exactly.


If you are used to having cats.. You will notice this is not a "cat" Look at muscles.. Look at neck. Look at the stride.. Look at the ears..


I have had 30 lb cats... Straight killers.. They are nowhere near that big.. That is NOT a "house cat"







That cat has an issue though.. It doesn't seem to be where it is.. If someone can explain the orange shadows.. But otherwise... It looks kinda funky..

The size though.. I am over 6 ft tall. That cat would come near my knee. Not up to my knee. But high up on my calf.
edit on 24-12-2014 by KnightLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 24 2014 @ 03:33 AM
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edit on 24-12-2014 by Cogito, Ergo Sum because: double post.



posted on Dec, 24 2014 @ 03:33 AM
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originally posted by: KnightLight

The cat in question is bigger than some people are thinking.. The tree to the direct front that splits into two?

You cannot wrap your hand around that tree. Maybe if you have bigger hands than me.

What about perspective...? Without a lot more information, there is simply no way to know how much closer the cat is, compared to the tree...and hence the comparative sizes of tree and cat. Can be very deceiving. How would you know how thick that tree is?


The cat is like 60 lbs...

Very unlikely to be that big IMO. Though feral cats grow very large. Seriously, some of them would make you look twice.

www.australiangeographic.com.au...


originally posted by: KnightLightIf you are used to having cats.. You will notice this is not a "cat" Look at muscles.. Look at neck. Look at the stride.. Look at the ears..


I have had 30 lb cats... Straight killers.. They are nowhere near that big.. That is NOT a "house cat"

Everything about this (though very poor quality) looks like feral moggy (house cat). It doesn't seem to have the right shape ears, solid head/shoulders, thick/solid legs, long body, sweeping tail etc. of a panthera type of cat. Looks like a normal large black moggy. Everything looks constent with felis catus IMO.


That cat has an issue though.. It doesn't seem to be where it is.. If someone can explain the orange shadows.. But otherwise... It looks kinda funky..

Hard to tell from such poor quality, but looks like something has disturbed the leaf litter/ topsoil. Also, when timber has been laying on the ground for a while it can start to decay and leave areas like this. Could even be some bark amongst it.


The size though.. I am over 6 ft tall. That cat would come near my knee. Not up to my knee. But high up on my calf.

Unlikely to be very far out of the ordinary for a feral cat IMO but even if you're right, seriously, that isn't out of the question at all for a feral cat.


edit on 24-12-2014 by Cogito, Ergo Sum because: for the heck of it




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