It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

North Korea Internet Outage == SONY testing its capabilities to bring websites down

page: 2
11
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 07:36 PM
link   
a reply to: NoRulesAllowed

That is STAR-KP Ryugyong-dong,KP, Could be related to this, maybe they are changing over.


DPRK gets second link to Internet North Korea no longer relies on a single foreign telecom company to carry its Internet traffic to and from the rest of the world. Ever since Star Joint Venture launched the country’s first fully-fledged Internet connection in 2010, North Korean traffic has flowed across the country’s northern border and through an interconnection with China Netcom. China Netcom is one of China’s largest Internet backbone providers. In the last few days the country’s sole Internet operator has begun using an interconnection with Intelsat, the Washington-based international satellite operator, to offer a second route to its network. Existence of the link was revealed through analysis and monitoring of BGP (border gateway protocol) messages. These are automated announcements that constantly flow between routers and switches that make up the global Internet backbone and help determine the constantly-changing web of thousands of connections that link service providers worldwide. Until April 4, North Korea’s Star JV network had only announced a link via China Netcom. So, when you typed “www.kcna.kp” into your browser, routers at your service provider determined the best way to reach Pyongyang knowing the last-but-one stop would be China Netcom. Now there’s a choice. A second route via Intelsat started appearing in BGP announcements from April 5 (around 6am local Pyongyang time). Detected prefix: 175.45.176.0/24 , Announced by AS131279 (STAR-KP -- Ryugyong-dong) Detected upstream/next hop AS: AS22351(INTELSAT Intelsat Global BGP Routing Policy) The new route provides some backup, should China Netcom have a problem, and means users in some countries might see faster connection times to hit North Korea’s handful of websites. NorthKoreaTech analysis of traffic to sites like KCNA from points around the globe shows the majority of connections still appear to run via China Netcom, but some are being made through Intelsat. Star JV, the service provider formed by the country’s telecom ministry and Thailand’s Loxley Pacific, remains tight-lipped about its plans. It’s unknown if this connection is a temporary one, perhaps for an anticipated surge in traffic around the April 15th anniversary of the 100 years since the birth of Kim Il Sung, or if it will continue.


www.northkoreatech.org...




posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 07:53 PM
link   

Domain name servers for KP are now located on a network operated by Star JV, a telecommunications joint venture between the North Korean government and Thailand's Loxley Pacific.


It would seem that if data can't get the NK, can't resolve DNS. DNS failure would seem to be a side effect.



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 08:20 PM
link   
We're entering the age of Cyber warfare.

In the near future, wars won't be waged by Governments with the authorization of Congress. They'll be waged by corporations going rogue against any target they wish.

If you're a big enough Corporation, with deep enough pockets, you'll be able to take out any target's online services or access that you wish.

Don't want a news story breaking? Take out the websites and internet access of media providers.
Don't want a legal challenge succeeding? Take out the servers at SCOTUS.
Want to shut down power to New York City to upset a rival's product release? Easy !



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 08:23 PM
link   
a reply to: roadgravel




Sort of like the bridge of no return into North Korea.



175.45.177.77 is an NK website IP.


This page?


Visit to Pyongyang Kim Jong Suk Textile Mill Kim Jong Un, First Secretary of the Workers' Party of Korea, First Chairman of the National Defence Commission of the DPRK and Supreme Commander of the Korean People's Army, gave field guidance to the Pyongyang Kim Jong Suk Textile Mill. Shaking hands with officials of the mill one by one, he said he came to the mill to meet its workers who have fulfilled the production quotas assigned by the Party and are bringing about miracles and innovations in the year-end drive. He handed his autograph "Pyongyang Kim Jong Suk Textile Mill" to the officials.


Its up.



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 08:25 PM
link   
a reply to: babybunnies

there is one beauty in all this and that is that the tech. is so fragile.



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 08:50 PM
link   
Response times are super slow, but the first link to the NK news site loads fine for me. Trace route is showing it's connecting through a Chinese ISP, which is consistent with what someone mentioned in an earlier post. If there's only one (maybe two) routes in and out of North Korea then it's more than likely the Chinese telecom was experiencing network issues.

The other possibility is they botched a change to the great firewall of NK and accidentally blocked every domain known to man instead of a select few.



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 09:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Rocker2013

Couldn't agree more about NoKo and it's man child leader. It is that mentality that is concerning. When does his fantastical reality cross over to the rest of the worlds. When he is at his most embarrassed. If this is a retaliation of sorts he will react like a child. Kids are kids. One boys BB Gun is another boys nuke.



posted on Dec, 22 2014 @ 09:59 PM
link   
According to this article I was just looking at North Korea was totally offline. Fubar for them.

It says their only internet access is through China's Unicom network, so I suppose China could shut them off anytime they felt like it.


All of North Korea's routing is done through China Netcom, which is now part of China Unicom



As North Korea's sole Internet provider, it would be easy for China Unicom to disable North Korea's access


au.news.yahoo.com...

It looks surprisingly easy to kill North Korea's internet connection.

edit on 22-12-2014 by JimTSpock because: made change



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 08:10 AM
link   
Shut off the dear leaders access to pron, that's a lesson they'll never forget!



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 10:00 AM
link   
While humanity is entering more deaply into cyber-warfare the best advice I can give is : Screw clouds.
You want to keep your information to yourself? Get a hard drive.

Also, do not get a computer that you can't physically shut down the internet.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 10:31 AM
link   

originally posted by: BlastedCaddy
a reply to: Rocker2013

Couldn't agree more about NoKo and it's man child leader. It is that mentality that is concerning. When does his fantastical reality cross over to the rest of the worlds. When he is at his most embarrassed. If this is a retaliation of sorts he will react like a child. Kids are kids. One boys BB Gun is another boys nuke.



He's under the influence of Russia and China, NK probably won't do anything without their backing. NK needs those allies, it can't function without them. This is pretty much how their leadership gets all their luxuries while their people starve to death.

Without Russia and China supporting them, the NK regime would be dead within a year. There would be no revolution, no dramatic collapse, no impressive implosion, they would either leave the country or starve to death themselves.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 11:10 AM
link   
Nope.
Maybe a radio blackout created by the solar flares are the culprit but like ive said before in this day and age when we rely heavily on technology ( much further on than when the Carrington event happened) and also in a time when some are so so eager for new wars and conflicts it seems easier and more....profitable to blame others when what could be obvious is discarded.

Just sayin.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 01:44 PM
link   
a reply to: NoRulesAllowed

It doesn't necessarily mean they wiped their internet. It could have been a DDoS attack against a DNS server. This would make the DNS server go down, causing all of its records to be temporarily unreachable. Not wiped permanently.



posted on Dec, 23 2014 @ 01:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: LordGoofus
Response times are super slow, but the first link to the NK news site loads fine for me. Trace route is showing it's connecting through a Chinese ISP, which is consistent with what someone mentioned in an earlier post. If there's only one (maybe two) routes in and out of North Korea then it's more than likely the Chinese telecom was experiencing network issues.

The other possibility is they botched a change to the great firewall of NK and accidentally blocked every domain known to man instead of a select few.


I can see the network tech updating the firewall now:

*typing, typing typing*
*scratches forehead*
*typing*
Wait...there was only supposed to be one asterisk at the end, not 3....



LOL!
edit on 23-12-2014 by parad0x122 because: (no reason given)




top topics



 
11
<< 1   >>

log in

join