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SpaceX slips cargo launch (12/19/14)

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posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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SpaceX has slipped a planned cargo flight to the ISS. The mission was scheduled for December 19th, until early in January. The slip comes after a static fire test was performed and failed to run for the full duration scheduled. According to John Taylor, a SpaceX spokesman, the data shows that the mission could go forward, but they are choosing to delay out of caution. The next launch date is Jan 6th, with the 7th as a backup date.


PARIS -- Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) has pushed a Dec. 19 Dragon cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station (ISS) to Jan. 6 after a recent static fire test of the Falcon 9 v1.1 launch vehicle was cut short.

“While the recent static fire test accomplished nearly all of our goals, the test did not run the full duration,” SpaceX spokesman John Taylor said in a statement to Aviation Week. “The data suggests we could push forward without a second attempt, but out of an abundance of caution, we are opting to execute a second static fire test prior to launch.”

aviationweek.com...




posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 08:09 PM
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Better ask Russia for a ride..LOL



posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


“The data suggests we could push forward without a second attempt, but out of an abundance of caution, we are opting to execute a second static fire test prior to launch.”

Just curious. Was this a different vehicle undergoing testing?



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 08:46 AM
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originally posted by: YouNeedMe
Better ask Russia for a ride..LOL


Well, the next launch date, January 6, is Russian Christmas.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

It's one of their Falcon 9 v1.1 rockets.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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I'm glad they slipped it for now. Better safe than sorry. After two recent space vehicle failures, I'm glad SpaceX is doing the responsible thing and making sure everything is in order.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Another reason for the slip is that the ISS is about to enter a period of daylight for ten days. When they're in that phase there are thermal considerations preventing docking. A launch on the sixth docks the day after it ends.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I hadn't considered that. Very informative!

Sadly, my knowledge of orbital mechanics comes mostly from Kerbal Space Program.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 09:47 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Another reason for the slip is that the ISS is about to enter a period of daylight for ten days. When they're in that phase there are thermal considerations preventing docking. A launch on the sixth docks the day after it ends.


Correct me if I'm wrong but how does the ISS stay in sunlight for 10 days...doesn't it orbit the Earth every 90 minutes >>????



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: YouNeedMe

Due to the inclination of the orbit the ISS is in, there are a couple times a year where it doesn't pass behind the Earth's shadow for a period of a few days. Here's a diagram showing that:




posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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Good to know that space missions run under such a strict precautionary method. Too bad more sectors of government and business don't operate in the same manner.



posted on Jan, 9 2015 @ 02:22 AM
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What time is the launch UK time this morning?


--- just found the time -- 10:09 GMT


Good luck SpaceX!
edit on 9-1-2015 by MrBergstrom because: Additional info



posted on Jan, 10 2015 @ 12:01 PM
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Good launch. Found the landing platform but came down too hard on landing.




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