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What did ancient Babylonian songs sound like?

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posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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What really lasts in this world? What dies, what can be revived? Are humans basically the same now as in ancient times?

I was left pondering these questions after listening to singer and composer Stef Conner’s album The Flood. It’s probably the first ever to be sung in ancient Sumerian and Babylonian, and it’s hauntingly beautiful.

One concrete answer to the first question: clay. Clay lasts.



I take it they are not sure about the melody, but it is beautiful.

soundcloud.com.../sets/the-flood

Duet of A Sumerian Drinking Song , don't like this one as much a the flood

youtu.be...


edit on 123131p://bWednesday2014 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:03 PM
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I can't vouch for its authenticity, but I know there is a band called Dead Can Dance that makes music with historical elements. I believe the woman in the band did music for the movie Gladiator.

There's plenty of bands that replicate music from the past, and there's a big following. I don't go on Youtube very often, but I'm sure there's a bunch on there.

This is a an ancient Babylonian song played on a lyre.



And another


edit on 17-12-2014 by Yeahkeepwatchingme because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: Yeahkeepwatchingme
I can't vouch for its authenticity, but I know there is a band called Dead Can Dance that makes music with historical elements. I believe the woman in the band did music for the movie Gladiator.

There's plenty of bands that replicate music from the past, and there's a big following. I don't go on Youtube very often, but I'm sure there's a bunch on there.


but at least it's better than nothing. It is not perfect but at least it's the closest thing to the actual one. I mean you still hear a part of the past.
edit on 17-12-2014 by starwarsisreal because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:17 PM
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a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme

beautiful, thank you


edit on 013131p://bWednesday2014 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:39 PM
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Well it's very melodic sounding and easy on the ear, all the half-tones are very subtle. I'ts a bit like having one foot in the East and the other in the West.



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:40 PM
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So relaxing, I almost fell asleep when listening to it. I have to save that link.



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Stormdancer777


Are humans basically the same now as in ancient times?

Their love of melody is. Like how birdsong, crickets, the surf or wind in the trees soothes our ear, melody sounds catch the same place in our human hearts, imo.

I bet they had rock music, too. Drums? Wind? Flute? They marched, partied and rocked…

Images



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy
Well it's very melodic sounding and easy on the ear, all the half-tones are very subtle. I'ts a bit like having one foot in the East and the other in the West.


I agree



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I spent a lot of time researching roots of ancient music, did you listen to that second song?



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
So relaxing, I almost fell asleep when listening to it. I have to save that link.


absolutely, I will want this CD

I need to find the translation .
edit on 023131p://bWednesday2014 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: Stormdancer777


I spent a lot of time researching roots of ancient music, did you listen to that second song?

I don't usually listen to covers. I appreciate studying the ancients, all for it. I don't know what they looked like, talked like or sounded like. Its impossible to tell from here.

Sorry, no disrespect intended…



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Stormdancer777


I spent a lot of time researching roots of ancient music, did you listen to that second song?

I don't usually listen to covers. I appreciate studying the ancients, all for it. I don't know what they looked like, talked like or sounded like. Its impossible to tell from here.

Sorry, no disrespect intended…


Yup, we truly can't know exactly.

need a time machine



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: Stormdancer777

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Stormdancer777


I spent a lot of time researching roots of ancient music, did you listen to that second song?

I don't usually listen to covers. I appreciate studying the ancients, all for it. I don't know what they looked like, talked like or sounded like. Its impossible to tell from here.

Sorry, no disrespect intended…


Yup, we truly can't know exactly.

need a time machine

Too bad really. I love to see the artifacts, the ruins, the grave sites, etc. My mind yearns to see them in their world, while my imagination struggles to make up for the lack.

Sometimes movies carry similitudes (like "Apocalypto") and I love those envisions, but still its not the real thing and will always be jaded by our perspective. I'm with you though, love to delve into the what ifs, and how dids.



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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a reply to: Stormdancer777

Thanks! Really enjoyed hearing that. I read up a bit on how on earth they managed to 'reconstruct' some of the music, given that I didn't assume they had some kind of music notes system, let alone one we can interpret easily. Apparently they looked at the instruments and analysed their language, the way it'd be pronounced and what music from similar cultures /languages and peoples around them sounded like in an effort to compare them somewhat. I enjoy the result, whether it's very accurate or not.

edit on 17-12-2014 by Pitou because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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Nice thread. I'm saving this one. I enjoy the traditional music every now and then. Thanks!



posted on Dec, 17 2014 @ 08:49 PM
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Is it known what relationship the notes of a Babylonian musical sequence bore to each other? Did they have scales or modes? What were the intervals? Or are these just Babylonian words set to a modern Western or other contemporary scale?



posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 11:27 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
Is it known what relationship the notes of a Babylonian musical sequence bore to each other? Did they have scales or modes? What were the intervals? Or are these just Babylonian words set to a modern Western or other contemporary scale?


good questions,

I don't think they were sure of the melody, another poster had some answers




Pitou

Thanks! Really enjoyed hearing that. I read up a bit on how on earth they managed to 'reconstruct' some of the music, given that I didn't assume they had some kind of music notes system, let alone one we can interpret easily. Apparently they looked at the instruments and analysed their language, the way it'd be pronounced and what music from similar cultures /languages and peoples around them sounded like in an effort to compare them somewhat. I enjoy the result, whether it's very accurate or not

edit on 113131p://bThursday2014 by Stormdancer777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 18 2014 @ 01:55 PM
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Very beautiful, better than 99 percent of "today's" music.



posted on Dec, 19 2014 @ 01:37 PM
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originally posted by: Aleister
Very beautiful, better than 99 percent of "today's" music.


LOL I was thinking the same thing



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