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The Case For Past Life On Mars: Revisiting The Fossil Outcrop at Eagle Crater

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posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 01:33 AM
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a reply to: mangust69

Interesting links, thanks. Here's a screenshot from one of the vids that I found rather interesting:



I don't speak russian but they're obviously talking about 'dinosaur eggs', right? I have to admit that I've never heard anyone discussing the possibility that these spherules might be eggs of some sort. Interesting alternative viewpoint, though.




posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 07:48 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

Great post. Star and flag. Very interested and well presented. More please!



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: Phage

Phage.. as usual your posts make a lot of sense.

Not to derail the thread, because this discussion could have it's own thread, or it might even be pointless, but do you think if you take that knowledge into account that going to Mars is in fact pointless seem from a biological and evolutionary point of view.

I mean, if Mars already got cooked and used up the natural way several billions of years ago, what would the point be to go there and try to terraform it if only to see it deteriorate again into dust?



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: IWasHereEonsAgo

The root problem with Mars is the absence of a strong global magnetic field like we have here on Earth. Even if we somehow managed to generate earth-like atmosphere, in the absence of the magnetic field the solar wind and radiation will strip the atmosphere molecule by molecule like it did billions of years ago.

Our only hope on Mars is to live underneath domes, or underneath the ground.
edit on 16-12-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r yes, of dinosaur there are more than a meter, and what size balls on Mars?



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: IWasHereEonsAgo

The root problem with Mars is the absence of a strong global magnetic field like we have here on Earth. Even if we somehow managed to generate earth-like atmosphere, in the absence of the magnetic field the solar wind and radiation will strip the atmosphere molecule by molecule like it did billions of years ago.

Our only hope on Mars is to live underneath domes, or underneath the ground.


Sounds awefully expensive. I hope they have a pretty good idea that it makes sense in the long run in terms of what we could benefit from Mars in resources or.... well... isn't that it?

Frankly, I think the money spent on local exploration would be better spend on working towards inventing interstellar engines that would take us somewhere else entirely.



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 12:09 PM
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a reply to: mangust69

The average size of the spherules on Mars is about 0.4cm, which is why I was rather inclined to compare them to terrestial cystoids, very simple organisms which thrived on Earth some 450 million years ago.

IMO the scale does seem to rule out some of the other alternative interpretations ... on the other hand: it's really difficult to tell as long as we don't know the first thing about actual biological ecosystems in the martian past.



posted on Dec, 16 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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fossilized sea urchins different size and color www.picshare.ru... box 5x3x1 rouble 2 sm



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