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How weird is this? Possibly billions of parents lie to their children about a mytical being. Not g

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posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 06:44 AM
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Op just sounds like a sad bastard who hasn't got anyone to share it with !
And if he has! I pity them !
Not all People don't go out and spend for the sake of it !
I buy things for the kids for been kids .
They deserve it for been good not perfect ,
But good and it is probs the only time we get more than a day together without all the real # going on !
And I love seeing there face when they see there new bike or toy and helping building Lego or cooking together !
Ps did I say your a sad bastard !
And I buy wisely as does a lot of people !
Adverts tent to have the opposite effect on me tbh , I tent to not buy off the rammed down your throat company's .
edit on 14-12-2014 by Denoli because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:39 AM
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Some people grow up knowing Santa isn't real, some kids though are like the religious, they still believe in Santa even though they stumbled over their presents in their parents closet on Christmas eve.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:42 AM
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Agree 100% op! Look at the rationalizations for lying to your children. It makes them feel good! But when they learn Santa isn't real, it doesn't feel good, does it? Takes the magic right out of it. We feed our children all kinds of spiritual and religious lies and crap, without knowing whether one bit of it is true. Human beings are very confused creatures.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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Yes indeed, how terrible it is to do something to make your child happy!

I feel deeply ashamed that I used fantasy to bring joy to my child, and the fact that I only based my desision to do so on my own personal experience and that of nearly everybody I ever met makes it even worse.

For shame.


a reply to: Calalini



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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I find it weird that people think it is such an important topic.

My mother was completely appalled when my daughter told her santa wasn't real. When she asked my about santa before I just explained the story and told her that some people believed in him. From that she ascertained he wasn't real by herself. My mother's reaction was funny as all hell though.

My S.O. was worried about her saying something when she reached school age that would upset others. I patiently explained that it wasn't an issue since we live in a very diverse city that has children of many different beliefs.

I don't see a point in the lie. Christmas is about present's and that's #1 in a kids eyes. On top of that kids get curious and try staying up way to late trying to find out the truth. This can lead to seeing and hearing things kids have no business hearing or seeing.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:17 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


The next time they come up with a picture they have made DO NOT LIE because lying is wrong, instead be critical and point out how utterly rubbish it it.

Creations from the developing mind of a child aren't "rubbish", they're art. They know its not 'real'.
Inducing "rubbish" from outside upon them is entirely different. Parents are supposed to know better.

They're just kids. And we bribe them with gifts to go along with the sham. Its a ponzi scheme for kids.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:20 AM
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Christmas with the kids is about Santa and sharing,also about helping each other bonding, reflecting about those we miss .
And tbh we don't even mention Jesus once .
We just like been together with no work commitments and just been happy .



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:21 AM
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I was reponding to the members saying that you should not lie to children, When my son shows me a picture he has drawn and it is rubbish in that is not very well done I lie to him and say it's very good.

Like when a woman asks you if you think they have gained weight. You lie.

a reply to: intrptr



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:23 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


…I used fantasy to bring joy to my child, and the fact that I only based my decision to do so on my own personal experience and that of nearly everybody I ever met makes it even worse.


Yes it does. If they told you to sacrifice your child to the God of Abraham would you do that, too? Because everyone does it?

I know extreme example. We just ruin their trust with Santa, Easter Bunny and the tooth fairy, among others.

I'm not going into TV, church, circuses and zoos.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


Like when a woman asks you if you think they have gained weight. You lie.

Thats what you do.

This is about lying to children, not adults.

ETA: Thats where we first experience fabrication. Maybe adults lie so freely to some extent depending on how they are raised. If they are lied to when young, that makes it okay?
edit on 14-12-2014 by intrptr because: additional



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:32 AM
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Acually I dont I was joking, I ask if they want an honest opinion or cheering up.

I am struggling to see telling children about santa as bieng a lie. At that age they do not have the mental capacity to distinguish between fantasy and reality.

I don't think you can interact with small children and apply adult values.

a reply to: intrptr



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:42 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


At that age they do not have the mental capacity to distinguish between fantasy and reality.

Right, it hasn't developed yet. The whole Santa thing is a monkey wrench in their works, imo.

But we are compelled to do it. After all, who wants to be the family down the block that "doesn't believe in Santa"?

Your child might come home from school crying for being teased. Is their identity being formed to depend on what others think of them even at that young age?

Part of "conditioning" for later life. People may say, it's not that important and they are right, from an adult perspective.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:47 AM
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a reply to: LadyTrick


It is pretty much impossible to be so clear cut with reality and fantasy with children under 6 and even harder to explain it.

And yet knowing that, we make up this whole charade. Kind of taking advantage of that vulnerability, isn't it?

Like when Bernie Maddof convinces you to join his "club' of investors or the News media fabricates "enemies" overseas that threaten our national boundaries.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:51 AM
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No, it is absolutley nothing like that whatsoever, that is my point, you simply can not apply adult Cynicism to what is in essence a game of make belive created purly to bring happiness as a child.

How is giving the illusion of a magical person that gives you gifts taking advantage of vunerability?



a reply to: intrptr


edit on 1220141258pAmerica/Chicago2014-12-14T08:52:58-06:0052f52 by nonspecific because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 08:55 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: nonspecific


At that age they do not have the mental capacity to distinguish between fantasy and reality.

Right, it hasn't developed yet. The whole Santa thing is a monkey wrench in their works, imo.

But we are compelled to do it. After all, who wants to be the family down the block that "doesn't believe in Santa"?

Your child might come home from school crying for being teased. Is their identity being formed to depend on what others think of them even at that young age?

Part of "conditioning" for later life. People may say, it's not that important and they are right, from an adult perspective.

I do not perpetuate it out of fear I do it because as I said earlier myself and at least 100 people I know have fond memories of the experience and choose to give my child the same experience.

I have honestly never met an adult who is traumatised in any way because of Santa clause not bieng real.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 09:04 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


How is giving the illusion of a magical person that gives you gifts taking advantage of vulnerability?

Because you are lying to them? There is no "magic" person, just you. Oh and the commercial enterprise behind that sweet euphemism.

You claim you are just playing make believe but the real wool is pulled over your eyes by the "season of giving" promoted by Walmart or Macys, Toys R Us, whatever.

Lol. The season to "shop" is what "santa" is about. So you are fooled, just like you fool the kids.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 09:11 AM
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I really do not know what to say about your concept of lying as far as children are concerned.

When you children were small are you honestly trying to tell me that you never pretended to be a tiger and play scare them, or a bear or what ever?

I spent nearly 3 years pretending to be animals, spacemen, racing cars and god knows what else. All of these things are apparently lying based on your terms and therefore wrong.

As for the commercialism I agree that it wrong but I actually like buying my child toys and games and christmas is a good time to do it if you ask me.

If he wants a new toy or game I say well wait and see what santa clause brings you and he has a sense and understanding of patience.

I really do think that this is being taken far to seriously.

a reply to: intrptr



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


I have honestly never met an adult who is traumatized in any way because of Santa clause not bieng real.

Childhood trauma is often suppressed. Of course adults don't see it as the whole world crashing down, just a little harmless, traditional… "fun".



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 09:14 AM
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originally posted by: droid56
a reply to: Kangaruex4Ewe

It's still a lie. Lying isn't something we should be doing when talking to our children.


Since adults do such magically wonderful awesome job of handling nothing but the truth all the time, certainly kids can too, right?

My kids' mother is a certified sociopath. By your logic, I should try explaining that concept to my kids when they're done with their homework, which consists of learning vocabulary words and learning how to read an analog clock ( in case you're confused, that's a roundabout way of saying neither of my kids are beyond 2nd grade right now), right? You know, they put their school stuff away and ask why dear old mom hasn't talked to them in three months, so I should sit them down for "the talk" about sociopaths. Give me a break dude. "Because I said so" parenting is far worse than letting your kid believe in Santa.

If believing in Santa makes my kids Christmas a little more special, I'm not taking that away from them until they ask the question.



posted on Dec, 14 2014 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: nonspecific


I really do think that this is being taken far to seriously.

Just a little harmless "conversational"… (?)

thanks for being nice about it.



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