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Scientists Have Discovered Possible Evidence Of Life And Biological Activity On Mars -- Report

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posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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There's a published paper which concludes that proof of life on Martian surface arrived on earth in the form of Tissint meteorite in 2011. The claim is made based on some "internal features" that "appear to be organic materials."



Upon conducting "chemical, microscopic and isotope analysis" of the carbon component they derived several explanations, one being that the carbon was filled in the fissures before Tissint fell from Mars.

"A more likely explanation is that liquids containing organic compounds of biological origin infiltrated Tissint's 'mother' rock at low temperatures, near the Martian surface," reads the report. Another explanation states that the organic matter may have been appeared on Mars when "very primitive meteorites - carbonated chondrites - fell on it."


Whether this proves life or not, I'll leave that up for ATS to decide. So, what says ATS?

au.ibtimes.com...-So




posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 02:48 AM
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Lol, what do they mean it "fell" from Mars?

Im no genius but a rock does not simply fall from the surface of a planet.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 02:52 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

There's quite a bit of information about this latest analysis of the Tissint meteorite and a few other meteorites in a thread I started a couple of days ago here.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 03:43 AM
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a reply to: funkadeliaaaa

A meteor hit Mars and threw lots of stuff out into space and part of it reached earth.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 03:50 AM
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And, it is a subject that has been discussed on multiple threads on ATS.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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a reply to: funkadeliaaaa

I'll totally agree with one part of your last (second) sentence.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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I wonder are they all now taking their cue from Professor Hoover (NASA retired). He maintains that very old, in this case Mars rocks need not be considered as contaminated if the criteria for ancient fossils in meteorites is met, his key premise is that any organic material found inside where there is an absence of Nitrogen is just that, a fossil, not something recently introduced into the meteorite. Nitrogen, takes millions of years to outgas from dead organisms.
In edit, I found some information at Wiki and in fact isotopes of Nitrogen were present along with the other materials, so it must be that the meteorites examined by Professor Hoover were much older, and that the Tissint meteorite had these materials or gases that are being considered as entrapped in the meteorite, I suppose that follows since the Tissint meteorite/s was seen to fall and break up and quickly recovered. So it seems this is another possible confirmation of life on Mars.


en.wikipedia.org...

Still and all, there are already some detractors on this meteorites story, how convincing is pretty much out there if it is all hypothetical.
www.space.com...
edit on 8-12-2014 by smurfy because: Link.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: funkadeliaaaa

I've always wondered about that too, how 'martian' meteors end up on earth. After reading funkadeliaaaa's explanation below, now I know. But, how on earth (pun intended) do scientists definitively know it came from Mars? We've never collected any Mars rock samples and brought them home to study so you can't compare it to anything tangible. Maybe it was ejected from some other planet. I've also wondered about scientists dating things. When carbon dating was discovered/invented, how did they know they get it right? Unless you have a benchmark for initial comparison, how can you know? For instance, if you have an antique dinner table that you know without a doubt is 120 year old, you can use it to compare other old tables and get a decent estimate of other tables by construction, finish, etc.... But how do you take a rock, carbon date it and say it's x-million years old? What if your original carbon dating formula was off. You'd have no way of knowing because no one was around then.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: funkadeliaaaa
Lol, what do they mean it "fell" from Mars?

Im no genius but a rock does not simply fall from the surface of a planet.


Dislodged by meteorite and cometary impacts is often the case.

Another way for rocks (reasonably small ones at least) to get from Mars to here, is via violent volcanic activity on Mars spewing debris and rocks high enough to escape Mars gravity and then fall on Earth.

There's probably a lot more Martian dust on Earth than there is rocks anyway...although i'd imagine it would be impossible to find and isolate it though.

Fine grains can survive entry through our atmosphere, provided they are small enough particles. They basically float down through the atmosphere over a number of years. Guestimates of around two years is how long it would take a very fine (talc powder size) particle to fall through our skies and land.

Of course, over millions and millions of years, a LOT of Martian dust would be here on Earth.

If ancient microbes attached to the surfaces and inside nano-fissures on fine dust particles were blasted out into space hundreds of millions or billions of years ago, they may well have survived the hazards of their trip through space and their entry into our atmosphere...perhaps all life on Earth started out as simple ancient microbes from Mars billions of years ago.

Nanu nanu.



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