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Selfie of Curiousity poseing on the pink cliffs of Mars whom or what took the photo?

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posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:08 AM
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Just wondering about this photo of curiousty on the surface of Mars Gale Cratwer at or near base of Sharpr Mountain.
Ut doesnt apear faked ,PHOTO SHOPED .
We see the entire vechicle shadows alliged with surounding terrain rocks theres do boom wire or arm visable in the photo.No extennsion joind to vechicle could have captured the image.
Short of haveing a small drone helo craft.copter wich wouldnt fly in the thin atmospere .
Hovering after detaching from the rover takeing the photo.

I can not see how the photo image was captured.
Either not flying drone
Another seprate rover took it or a Martian or a Human.
Or am I missing something obvious.
If so Doh! In advance

OK You look tell me what took the photo

www.telegraph.co.uk...




posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:12 AM
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What is that circular thing hovering over the rover in the distance? Oh never mind, the bug just flew off my monitor.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:13 AM
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posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:14 AM
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Maybe it set up a camera in that position then rolled "into frame"?

Just seems rational imo.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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a reply to: ecossiepossie

Check out the link to find the answer:

www.nasa.gov...


At least this is what NASA wants us to believe. In my opinion, I think it was taken in a studio at area 51.

edit on 6-12-2014 by NotMoose because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 12:47 AM
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a reply to: ecossiepossie

Rover takes several pictures that are stitched together leaving out the extended arm that took the photo's.

NASA



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 01:21 AM
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ok

i will admit thats a feasable way to do it haveing watched the Animation.

They would then have to remove all the shadows wich would be all over haveing been taken at differing times.

Choose the shadows they wanted to keep by matching the ones In formation with the surounding area .

Yes that would produce the image mystery solved.

Thank you.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 03:06 AM
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originally posted by: ecossiepossie
ok

i will admit thats a feasable way to do it haveing watched the Animation.

They would then have to remove all the shadows wich would be all over haveing been taken at differing times.

Choose the shadows they wanted to keep by matching the ones In formation with the surounding area .

Yes that would produce the image mystery solved.

Thank you.

They didn't have to do anything like that, they simply used a panorama-stitching software that did everything automatically. I had done it myself using the original images and Microsoft ICE software. The shadows weren't an issue at all, actually. The only thing "manipulated" in the resulting image is the part of the robotic arm that was visible in two of the individual images.

I have more detailed posts about this, with pictures (from a different "selfie"), here and here.


+

=

edit on 6-12-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 04:25 AM
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There were challenges galore, but none quite so great as getting the long arm of the rover out of the picture. A close look at the final image shows the "shoulder" of the robotic arm on the front of the rover. But the rest of the five-jointed appendage has been removed and replaced by pixels from other frames that showed the ground or the rover behind the arm.


From Semperfortis link


Nasa using it's photoshop skills, some conspiracy theorists should feel vindicated now, lol.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 04:41 AM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP

There were challenges galore, but none quite so great as getting the long arm of the rover out of the picture. A close look at the final image shows the "shoulder" of the robotic arm on the front of the rover. But the rest of the five-jointed appendage has been removed and replaced by pixels from other frames that showed the ground or the rover behind the arm.


From Semperfortis link


Nasa using it's photoshop skills, some conspiracy theorists should feel vindicated now, lol.

Umm, it's the article autor's words, not the NASA people's words. And the author exagerrated the difficulty of the task. The NASA people's actual words: "Actually, there weren't that many images with the arm in them because of how we positioned the arm," Ravine explained. "It's like if you hold a camera out in front of you with your elbow crooked and shoot—what you'll probably get is your face and top of your body including your shoulder, but most of your arm is out of the frame."

As I have shown above in pictures and links to my other ATS posts, there were only 2 individual images where the "shoulder" part of the arm is visible. In either of the images, the arm is pointing in opposite direction from the other image, revealing terrain obscured by the arm in that other image. I don't know how exactly NASA assembled the mosaic; parhaps they did it manually. But as I have also mentioned above, it can be done fairly fast and simple by using an automated panorama-stitching software like Microsoft ICE.

~~~

[Edit] lots of stars for Tinfoil's post, and none for mine. *sigh* predictable behaviour on ATS

edit on 6-12-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace

originally posted by: TinfoilTP

There were challenges galore, but none quite so great as getting the long arm of the rover out of the picture. A close look at the final image shows the "shoulder" of the robotic arm on the front of the rover. But the rest of the five-jointed appendage has been removed and replaced by pixels from other frames that showed the ground or the rover behind the arm.


From Semperfortis link


Nasa using it's photoshop skills, some conspiracy theorists should feel vindicated now, lol.

Umm, it's the article autor's words, not the NASA people's words. And the author exagerrated the difficulty of the task. The NASA people's actual words: "Actually, there weren't that many images with the arm in them because of how we positioned the arm," Ravine explained. "It's like if you hold a camera out in front of you with your elbow crooked and shoot—what you'll probably get is your face and top of your body including your shoulder, but most of your arm is out of the frame."

As I have shown above in pictures and links to my other ATS posts, there were only 2 individual images where the "shoulder" part of the arm is visible. In either of the images, the arm is pointing in opposite direction from the other image, revealing terrain obscured by the arm in that other image. I don't know how exactly NASA assembled the mosaic; parhaps they did it manually. But as I have also mentioned above, it can be done fairly fast and simple by using an automated panorama-stitching software like Microsoft ICE.

~~~

[Edit] lots of stars for Tinfoil's post, and none for mine. *sigh* predictable behaviour on ATS


Did they or did they not remove part of the arm by photo editing? Of course they did so what's your point that it was easy?



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 07:16 AM
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originally posted by: TinfoilTP
Did they or did they not remove part of the arm by photo editing? Of course they did so what's your point that it was easy?

That's because it's an automated thing, nobody had to do anything special, just tell the software what photos to use and the stitching software does everything by itself, I have done it many times, with photos from Curiosity and with photos taken by myself.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 08:01 AM
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originally posted by: semperfortis
How Curiosity Took a Self-Portrait

Semper


Thanks for that Semper. I must look at the new picture since that one is also a panorama/mosaic.
I must add too that NG link into my so-called HOAX thread as by way of further explanantion.



posted on Dec, 6 2014 @ 01:31 PM
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So I guess these guys are real good at editing photos...... oh wait..... we knew that already, thanks for the admission NASA airbrush away, Lord knows, they do it to everything else, eh NASA HINT HINT



posted on Dec, 7 2014 @ 05:32 AM
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As I haven't made one for some time I decided to make a panorama with the photos from sol 613 from the link posted by wildespace, using Microsoft ICE, the easiest (and free) way of making panoramas I know.

This is what it looks like (click to jump to the GigaPan page with the full size panorama).


To show how easy it is to make a panorama with Microsoft ICE I made a 2 minutes video showing how it's done, omitting only the first (downloading the 75 images) and the last (saving the image) parts.



The only bad thing about something automated as Microsoft ICE is the lack of control over what it does, so there's no way of correcting the bad choices it made while creating the panorama and that resulted in some stitching flaws.

I have also used Hugin, as it allows full control of what is done, but the user has to choose the common points in the photos so the software can stitch the photos by those common points, and that's a lot of work for something done as a hobby, so I have only used it twice.



posted on Dec, 7 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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What percentage of the Mars photography was taken in a valley setting with a severely limited horizon?
If I were driving rover I would look for a gently mounded crater edge and climb up where there was a wide view of the rim and beyond.



posted on Dec, 7 2014 @ 06:05 PM
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originally posted by: Slichter
What percentage of the Mars photography was taken in a valley setting with a severely limited horizon?

In the case of Curiosity, 100%, as it was landed inside a crater that was thought to have been a lake a long time ago.


If I were driving rover I would look for a gently mounded crater edge and climb up where there was a wide view of the rim and beyond.

If you were driving the rover, if you were the one deciding where to land the rover, if you were the one deciding where to drive the rover and if the rover could do it.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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a reply to: ArMaP

I wouldn't call Curiosity's location a "valley with a severely limited horizon", as the Gale crater is huge and you can see for many miles around.

Using the "ruler" tool in Google Mars, it gives approx 25 km (or 15.5 miles) from Curiosity's approx location to the crater's edge. That's far enough for it to be barely visible behind all that dust in the atmosphere.


edit on 8-12-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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originally posted by: ecossiepossie
ok

i will admit thats a feasable way to do it haveing watched the Animation.

They would then have to remove all the shadows wich would be all over haveing been taken at differing times.

Choose the shadows they wanted to keep by matching the ones In formation with the surounding area .

Yes that would produce the image mystery solved.

Thank you.










Seems like a large waste of tax payer money to make a cool photo? Anyone that can do all that probably getting a phat check.



posted on Dec, 8 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
I wouldn't call Curiosity's location a "valley with a severely limited horizon", as the Gale crater is huge and you can see for many miles around.

That's true, but I wrote that because I think that's what Slichter was referring to, the fact that we cannot see the real horizon on the photos from Curiosity, as there's the crater rim to the north, east and west and Mount Sharp to the south.

I'm sure that a rover or lander on top of Olympus Mons would return some nice photos.




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